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J. W. Paul (search for this): chapter 47
nce from me on my right. I was consequently deprived of the valuable assistance his quickness and daring so well qualify him to render on the field. Captain John B. Howell, my Ordnance Officer, was ordered to remain constantly with his ammunition train, which, as above stated, had to be left in the rear. This deprived me of the immediate services of this gallant officer. The officers of my staff, Major B. F. Fall, brigade Commissary; Mr. James H. Tucker volunteer Aid-de-Camp, and Mr. J. W. Paul, acting Inspector-General, are all entitled to my thanks for the assistance rendered me during the engagement. The aggregate force engaged against Fort Hindman and the defences in front of it, was thirteen hundred and thirty-nine. I have, Major, the honor to be, With much respect, Your obedient servant, J. F. Fagan, Brigadier-General. Report of Colonel King. Heaquarters King's regiment Arkansas infantry, camp at Searcy, July 22, 1863. Captain Wyatt C. Thomas: Sir
s, and Lieutenant Armstrong. In the Eighth regiment were killed: Lieutenants Foster and Farley. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Murray; Captains McRill, Bradley and Johnson; Lieutenants Pierce, McBride, Gibson, Dudley, Good, Stevens, and Weatherford. In the Seventh regiment were killed: Captains Cocke and Perry. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Cummings; Adjutant Waisburg, Captain Gillett, Stemmons, and McGee; Lieutenants Austin, Anderson, Weims, Wight, Strong, Wall, Finley, West, Gonce, and Bronaugh. Colonel Lewis captured. In the Tenth regiment were wounded: Lieutenants Wright, Baker, and Hanley. The following is a summary of my losses in each regiment, battalion, and the artillery detachment: Seventh regimentKilled17  Wounded126  Missing54--197 Eighth regimentKilled14  Wounded82  Missing67--163 Ninth regimentKilled7  Wounded53--60 Tenth regimentKilled11  Wounded41  Missing237--289 Pindall's sharps'trsKilled9  Wounded26  Missing8--43 Artillery detach'tKilled1
himself in the capture of three prisoners. I brought off nine prisoners, eight negroes, five mules, one horse and equipments, one ambulance and team, and a small lot of clothing and canteens. Companies B and K (skirmishers), commanded respectively by Captains F. R. Earle and Arkansas Wilson, deserve especial mention for the steadiness with which they advanced, drove the enemy before them, and maintained their positions under a heavy artillery fire. Lieutenant-Colonel Gunter and Major Pettigrew were constantly at their posts in the discharge of their duties. The only casualty in my regiment was private A. C. Peck, Company B, severely wounded in the chest. I am, Captain, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, W. H. Brooks, Colonel, commanding. Report of Colonel Bell's regiment. camp Bayou Deview, July 10, 1863. Captain Thomas: Captain: I have the honor to make my report of the part taken by Bell's regiment in the engagement of the fourth instant at Hele
William Hicks (search for this): chapter 47
ough the thigh in front of the fort. Captain Robinson, acting Major, fell mortally wounded in front of his men. There also fell mortally wounded the brave, .the zealous Major Martin, of Hart's regiment, as also Major Stephenson, of Gause's regiment. There also fell Captain Garland, of Glenn's regiment; Lieutenant Eppes, of Gause's regiment, than whom a better man or braver soldier has not offered up his life during the war. Colonels Glenn and Gause and Lieutenant-Colonels Rogan and Hicks deserve special mention for the cool and daring manner in which they led their men. Lieutenant Crabtree, of Green's regiment, displayed the greatest intrepidity. Sergeant Champ, Company A, of Hart's regiment, deserves the greatest credit for gallantry, rushing in advance of his regiment in the charge. Color-Sergeant Garland, of Glenn's regiment, also deserves special mention. He advanced his regimental colors to the front, and maintained his position through the assault, his colors
R. C. Newton (search for this): chapter 47
the enemy, and twice drove him away handsomely. I send herewith reports of Colonels Dobbins and Newton. I am, Major, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, L. M. Walker, Brigadier-General. opened fire on them with my battery and small arms, and, with the assistance of a portion of Colonel Newton's regiment, again caused them to fall back and move their battery still further down the levYour obedient servant, arch. S. Dobbins, Colonel, commanding Regiment Cavalry. Report of Colonel Newton. headquarters Newton's regiment Arkansas cavalry, camp at Gist's, Phillips county, ArkaNewton's regiment Arkansas cavalry, camp at Gist's, Phillips county, Arkansas, July 8, 1863. Captain J. C. Alexander, A. A. G. Walker's Division, &c., in the Field: Captain: I have the honor, in obedience to your instructions of to-day, to submit the following report ofivate soldiers whom they led, fearless of danger, each seeming intent solely on doing his duty well. I am, Captain, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, R. C. Newton, Colonel, commanding.
hroughout the engagement had been chivalrous and manly, so much so as to attract universal attention and admiration. Here, also, I lost the services of Major John B. Cocke, who was severely wounded and compelled to retire from the field. It affords me much pleasure to bear testimony to the coolness, courage, and efficiency of this gallant officer. His services throughout that desperate fight were invaluable, and his absence was most keenly and sensibly felt. Lieutenants Richard Shaddock, Hinson, Hainard, and Thompson, were killed while bravely fighting at their posts. But to return to the fight: Graveyard Hill was evacuated soon after it was taken. The other positions to the left of that hill, that were to have been taken at daylight, had not even been attacked. The firing had ceased at all points except the firing of our brigade, and that of our enemies directed against us. This latter was now most terrific, and the whole force of the enemy seemed to be directed against our l
the work to be assaulted. All these fortifications were situated upon high, steep hills, with deep ravines and felled timber between, rendering the rapid and orderly movement of the troops very difficult. At twelve o'clock on the night of the third, the division was put in motion, my brigade in advance, which moved in the following order, viz.: first, battalion of sharpshooters, Major Pindall commanding, in front; second, the Ninth regiment, Colonel White; third, the Eighth regiment, Colonel Burns commanding; fourth, the Seventh regiment, Colonel Lewis commanding; fifth, the Tenth regiment, Colonel Pickett commanding. After moving on the main road about two miles, the column diverged to the left, along an obscure path for two miles further, and then left this path to the left, and followed up a rivulet, until arriving within about one and a half miles of Graveyard Hill. Day having not yet dawned, a halt was ordered, to await sufficient light, during which time my command was ord
R. H. Smith (search for this): chapter 47
nder my command, to protect our left flank. The regiment then advanced over the first hill. Here Captains Pleasants and Smith were wounded, and many men killed and wounded. The ground at this point was almost impassable, and the whole road and derom General Holmes to retire. My loss was fourteen killed, fifty-two wounded, one missing. Among the killed were Major R. H. Smith, my division Quartermaster, and Captain J. C. Clark, of Company D, Shelby's regiment. Major Smith was a gallant anMajor Smith was a gallant and valuable officer; he was shot dead beside a piece of artillery, encouraging and assisting the canonniers in their duties. Captain Clark was a most exemplary man and excellent officer; he was killed leading his men forward. Amongst the wounded,engaged, here, as everywhere else that I have ever placed him, was prompt and faithful and displayed great courage. Lieutenant Smith, adjutant of the regiment, brave to a fault, and seeking rather than avoiding danger, rendered much valuable service
tant Thomas, Lieutenants Kelly, Essleman, and Kerr. In Pindall's battalion were wounded: Captains Cake and Phillips, and Lieutenant Armstrong. In the Eighth regiment were killed: Lieutenants Foster and Farley. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Murray; Captains McRill, Bradley and Johnson; Lieutenants Pierce, McBride, Gibson, Dudley, Good, Stevens, and Weatherford. In the Seventh regiment were killed: Captains Cocke and Perry. Wounded: Lieutenant-Colonel Cummings; Adjutant Waisburg, Captain Gillett, Stemmons, and McGee; Lieutenants Austin, Anderson, Weims, Wight, Strong, Wall, Finley, West, Gonce, and Bronaugh. Colonel Lewis captured. In the Tenth regiment were wounded: Lieutenants Wright, Baker, and Hanley. The following is a summary of my losses in each regiment, battalion, and the artillery detachment: Seventh regimentKilled17  Wounded126  Missing54--197 Eighth regimentKilled14  Wounded82  Missing67--163 Ninth regimentKilled7  Wounded53--60 Tenth regimentKilled
Andrew D. White (search for this): chapter 47
rigade in advance, which moved in the following order, viz.: first, battalion of sharpshooters, Major Pindall commanding, in front; second, the Ninth regiment, Colonel White; third, the Eighth regiment, Colonel Burns commanding; fourth, the Seventh regiment, Colonel Lewis commanding; fifth, the Tenth regiment, Colonel Pickett commant White's battle-flag, waving over the works, announced that Graveyard Hill was won. Thirty men of Tilden's battery having been armed and sent forward with Colonel White's regiment, under command of Lieutenant Lessneur, for the purpose of working the enemy's guns, upon their capture, this officer immediately took them in chargellowing commissioned officers of the Ninth regiment fell killed on the field: Major Sandford, Captain Launius, Lieutenant Spencer. The following were wounded: Colonel White, Adjutant Thomas, Lieutenants Kelly, Essleman, and Kerr. In Pindall's battalion were wounded: Captains Cake and Phillips, and Lieutenant Armstrong. In th
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