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Browsing named entities in a specific section of HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks). Search the whole document.

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Isaac Greenleaf (search for this): chapter 10
y Pool14 Jonathan Patten15 E. Hall16 Nathan Tufts17 Samuel Tufts, 2d18 Benjamin Teal19 Timothy Tufts20 Henry Fowle21 James Tufts22 Richard Hall23 Isaac Hall24 Thomas Seccombe25 Benjamin Hall26 Minister's Pew27 Isaac Royal28 Timothy Newhall29 Peter Jones30 Nathan Tufts, jun.31 Timothy Hall32 Hezekiah Blanchard33 Thomas Patten34 Joseph Thompson35 Henry Putnam36 Seth Blodget37 Willis Hall38 Jacob Hall39 John Leathe40 Samuel Jenks41 Andrew Hall42 Isaac Warren43 Isaac Greenleaf44 Samuel Kidder45 Simon Tufts46 Ebenezer Blanchard47 Edward Brooks48 It is specially recorded, that, at the raising of this meeting-house, which took place July 26 and 27, 1769, there was no one hurt. That such an exemption was remarkable, at that period, may be explained by the fact, that probably our fathers did not put themselves into that condition which generally secures catastrophies. An authentic record from another town, under date of Sept. 13, 1773, may make this mat
Samuel Tufts (search for this): chapter 10
d pew No. 27; which thereupon became the minister's pew, owned by the town. The pews in the meeting-house were chosen according to the vote of the town and the tenor of subscription, Feb. 8, 1770, as follows :-- Thomas Brooks, jun.No. 1 John Bishop2 Stephen Hall3 Aaron Hall4 Ebenezer Hall5 John Wade6 Samuel Hall7 Watts Turner8 William Tufts, 3d9 William Tufts10 Simon Bradshaw11 Samuel Angier12 Francis Burns13 Zachary Pool14 Jonathan Patten15 E. Hall16 Nathan Tufts17 Samuel Tufts, 2d18 Benjamin Teal19 Timothy Tufts20 Henry Fowle21 James Tufts22 Richard Hall23 Isaac Hall24 Thomas Seccombe25 Benjamin Hall26 Minister's Pew27 Isaac Royal28 Timothy Newhall29 Peter Jones30 Nathan Tufts, jun.31 Timothy Hall32 Hezekiah Blanchard33 Thomas Patten34 Joseph Thompson35 Henry Putnam36 Seth Blodget37 Willis Hall38 Jacob Hall39 John Leathe40 Samuel Jenks41 Andrew Hall42 Isaac Warren43 Isaac Greenleaf44 Samuel Kidder45 Simon Tufts46 Ebenezer Blanchard4
John Albree (search for this): chapter 10
e country road, near Marble Brook, four or five rods south-east of the bridge now across that stream, which afterwards took the name of Meeting-house Brook, and retains it to this day. The land was owned by that self-made and thrifty farmer, Mr. John Albree; and on the 10th of January, 1726, the town voted to give fifty-five pounds for one acre, and to appropriate three hundred and sixty pounds for the building of the house. The committee appointed to determine the size and shape of the house , Captain Samuel Wade, Francis Whitmore, John Willis, Mr. John Whitmore, Mr. John Richardson, William Willis, Mr. Jonathan Hall, Mr. Peter Tufts, Deacon Thomas Hall, Mr. Benjamin Willis, Mr. Benjamin Porter, Mr. Thomas Oaks, Dr. Simon Tufts, Mr. John Albree, Mr. Joseph Tufts, Mr. William Patten, Mr. John Bradshaw, jun., and Mr. John Hall. We know not the exact position of any pew occupied by either of the twenty-five gentlemen, save one; and that is the pew, number one, which was the first
Nathaniel Francis (search for this): chapter 10
oblige the inhabitants of the West End of the town to procure the land for erecting a new meeting-house upon, at their own cost and charge; and also to remove all encumbrances, as expressed in said result. 4. That we, the subscribers, have, in obedience to said result, procured the land and removed the encumbrances, as above slid, at our own cost and charge; and, for these and the like reasons, we enter against said vote as being illegal and unjust. John Whitmore. Caleb Brooks. Nathaniel Francis. John Winship. William Willis. Stephen Hall. Jonathan Hall. Stephen Willis. Oliver Attwood. Abner Harris. John Francis. Samuel Francis. Thomas Willis. John Whitmore. John Francis. Ebenezer Brooks. Francis Whitmore. Samuel Brooks. William Pottony. Thomas Hall. As this subject created local or territorial interests. it was prudently thought best not to force any measure relating to it. More than a year elapsed before any decisive action was taken. July 19, 1722, vote
Nathaniel Waite (search for this): chapter 10
uilt at the time first specified; and the next movement towards it we find in a vote passed Sept. 13, 1695. At this time a subscription was opened, and one pound was subscribed by the following persons: Thomas Willis, Caleb Brooks, Stephen Francis, Stephen Willis, John Francis, John Whitmore, John Bradshoe, Jonathan Tufts, John Hall, jun., Nathaniel Hall, Stephen Hall, sen., John Willis, Stephen Hall, Percival Hall, Ebenezer Brooks. Twelve shillings were subscribed by Eleazer Wier and Nathaniel Waite, and six shillings by Samuel Brooks. At this meeting, the town voted, unanimously, that every person who refused to subscribe should pay twelve pence per head, and one penny on the pound, towards the building of the meeting-house. September 23, 1695, it was voted to give sixty pounds for the erection and finishing of the house; but, on Nov. 4, 1695, the town took a new step, as follows: The inhabitants, being now met .and assembled, have voted and agreed to have a pulpit and deacons
John Bishop (search for this): chapter 10
ouse upon the widow Watson's orchard, before her dwelling-house, provided said land can be procured on reasonable terms. This proposition was no more successful than the last. Aug. 22, 1768: Voted to build a meeting-house on land bought of Mr. John Bishop; the house to be of the following dimensions: sixty-six feet long, forty-six feet wide, with forty-eight pews on the floor, and eight in the gallery; with a tower from the ground, without a spire; two porches; doors and windows to be paintedd pew No. 27; which thereupon became the minister's pew, owned by the town. The pews in the meeting-house were chosen according to the vote of the town and the tenor of subscription, Feb. 8, 1770, as follows :-- Thomas Brooks, jun.No. 1 John Bishop2 Stephen Hall3 Aaron Hall4 Ebenezer Hall5 John Wade6 Samuel Hall7 Watts Turner8 William Tufts, 3d9 William Tufts10 Simon Bradshaw11 Samuel Angier12 Francis Burns13 Zachary Pool14 Jonathan Patten15 E. Hall16 Nathan Tufts17 Samue
John Leathe (search for this): chapter 10
ts10 Simon Bradshaw11 Samuel Angier12 Francis Burns13 Zachary Pool14 Jonathan Patten15 E. Hall16 Nathan Tufts17 Samuel Tufts, 2d18 Benjamin Teal19 Timothy Tufts20 Henry Fowle21 James Tufts22 Richard Hall23 Isaac Hall24 Thomas Seccombe25 Benjamin Hall26 Minister's Pew27 Isaac Royal28 Timothy Newhall29 Peter Jones30 Nathan Tufts, jun.31 Timothy Hall32 Hezekiah Blanchard33 Thomas Patten34 Joseph Thompson35 Henry Putnam36 Seth Blodget37 Willis Hall38 Jacob Hall39 John Leathe40 Samuel Jenks41 Andrew Hall42 Isaac Warren43 Isaac Greenleaf44 Samuel Kidder45 Simon Tufts46 Ebenezer Blanchard47 Edward Brooks48 It is specially recorded, that, at the raising of this meeting-house, which took place July 26 and 27, 1769, there was no one hurt. That such an exemption was remarkable, at that period, may be explained by the fact, that probably our fathers did not put themselves into that condition which generally secures catastrophies. An authentic record fr
Oliver Attwood (search for this): chapter 10
ouse upon, at their own cost and charge; and also to remove all encumbrances, as expressed in said result. 4. That we, the subscribers, have, in obedience to said result, procured the land and removed the encumbrances, as above slid, at our own cost and charge; and, for these and the like reasons, we enter against said vote as being illegal and unjust. John Whitmore. Caleb Brooks. Nathaniel Francis. John Winship. William Willis. Stephen Hall. Jonathan Hall. Stephen Willis. Oliver Attwood. Abner Harris. John Francis. Samuel Francis. Thomas Willis. John Whitmore. John Francis. Ebenezer Brooks. Francis Whitmore. Samuel Brooks. William Pottony. Thomas Hall. As this subject created local or territorial interests. it was prudently thought best not to force any measure relating to it. More than a year elapsed before any decisive action was taken. July 19, 1722, voted to build a meeting-house according to the advice and determination of the honored committee chos
Joseph Wilder (search for this): chapter 10
Captain Samuel Brooks. His son Thomas chose the same place in the third new house. The price of these pews varied from twelve to eight pounds. 1729: Voted to petition the General Court for some relief under present differences and difficulties. The town appoints Captain Ebenezer Brooks, Mr. Peter Seccombe, Mr. William Patten, and Jonathan Tomson, as a committee to lay the case before the committee of the House of Representatives. A committee of four (Hodijah Savage, Thomas Berry, Joseph Wilder, and William Ward) met at Medford, when all things were explained concerning the discontent and disputes about certain pews in the new meeting-house. The award was drawn up in form, and was final, and it placed three or four persons anew! June 26, 1740: The town voted to place a bell on the meeting-house; but, as it was decided to purchase the bell with money which should be raised from the sale of bricks owned by the town, the bell was not bought, because the bricks were not sold.
Jonathan Tufts (search for this): chapter 10
ant work, with full power to act therein, were Caleb Brooks and Thomas Willis, to be joined by the Selectmen, Joseph Hall and John Tufts. Owing to some obstacles, the house was not built at the time first specified; and the next movement towards it we find in a vote passed Sept. 13, 1695. At this time a subscription was opened, and one pound was subscribed by the following persons: Thomas Willis, Caleb Brooks, Stephen Francis, Stephen Willis, John Francis, John Whitmore, John Bradshoe, Jonathan Tufts, John Hall, jun., Nathaniel Hall, Stephen Hall, sen., John Willis, Stephen Hall, Percival Hall, Ebenezer Brooks. Twelve shillings were subscribed by Eleazer Wier and Nathaniel Waite, and six shillings by Samuel Brooks. At this meeting, the town voted, unanimously, that every person who refused to subscribe should pay twelve pence per head, and one penny on the pound, towards the building of the meeting-house. September 23, 1695, it was voted to give sixty pounds for the erection and
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