hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Fitzhugh Lee 706 4 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant 570 8 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman 536 12 Browse Search
William T. Sherman 508 0 Browse Search
John B. Hood 437 13 Browse Search
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) 373 5 Browse Search
Joseph E. Johnston 252 0 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 230 0 Browse Search
Hancock 217 3 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 213 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

Found 235 total hits in 67 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
J. C. Breckinridge (search for this): chapter 6
e could quickly march troops from one side to the other within his impregnable wedge. As Grant put it in his report, To make a direct attack from either wing would cause a slaughter of our men that even success would not justify. former by Breckinridge, and the scattered forces in western Virginia, and by Pickett and Hoke from North Carolina. From Bermuda Hundred where General Butler was bottled up --to use a phrase which Grant employed and afterward regretted-General W. F. Smith was orderemen of the Eighteenth, who had hastened from the landing-place at White House. These took position on the right of the Sixth, and the Federal line was promptly faced by Longstreet's corps, a part of A. P. Hill's, and the divisions of Hoke and Breckinridge. At six o'clock in the afternoon Wright and Smith advanced to the attack, which Hoke and Kershaw received with courage and determination. The Confederate line was broken in several places, but before night checked the struggle the Southerner
Horatio G. Wright (search for this): chapter 6
ined their position. The short contest was a severe one for the Federal side. Wright lost about twelve hundred men and Smith one thousand. The following day the nd the Second Corps arrived at Cold Harbor and took position on the left of General Wright. Burnside, with the Ninth Corps, was placed near Bethesda Church on the roBurnside's and Warren's. Longstreet's corps, still under Anderson, was opposite Wright and Smith, while A. P. Hill, on the extreme right, confronted Hancock. There w batteries in their respective fronts; Smith, that he could go no farther until Wright advanced upon his left; Hancock, that it was useless for him to attempt a further advance until Wright advanced upon his right; Wright, that it was impossible for him to move until Smith and Hancock advanced to his support on his right and left Wright, that it was impossible for him to move until Smith and Hancock advanced to his support on his right and left to shield him from the enemy's enfilade. These despatches necessarily caused mystification at headquarters. . . . The explanation was simple enough, although it was
Ulysses S. Grant (search for this): chapter 6
at the North Anna Ten minutes with General Grant, June 2, 186. As the General-in-Chief o tree, two extraordinary things are happening: Grant is arriving at the tremendous decision to fighresult is a veritable moving picture series of Grant in the field — an opportunity without a parallictures reveal was as near a council of war as Grant ever came. Ten minutes with General Grant 1864--the first scene Ten minutes with General Grant, June 2, 1864--the second scene Ten minu an actor in these three scenes as a member of Grant's staff, that so many participants in the histral Porter himself sits reading a newspaper on Grant's right, and on his left is General Rawlins, hf of staff, next to Colonel Ely S. Parker. General Grant impassively listens to the report that Col The rest of the group center their looks upon Grant. Soldiers from the Third Division of the Fift assault at Cold Harbor was ever made.--General U. S. Grant in his Memoirs. According to Grant'[3 more...]
R. S. Ewell (search for this): chapter 6
ots were often enough to start a heavy and continuous musketry fire and a roar of artillery along the entire line. It was a favorite ruse of the Federal soldiers to aim their muskets carefully to clear the top of the Confederate breastworks and then set up a great shout. The Confederates, deceived into the belief that an attack was coming, would spring up and expose themselves to the well-directed volley which thinned their ranks. which was now the base of supplies. On the Southern side Ewell's corps, now commanded by General Early, faced Burnside's and Warren's. Longstreet's corps, still under Anderson, was opposite Wright and Smith, while A. P. Hill, on the extreme right, confronted Hancock. There was sharp fighting during the entire day, but Early did not succeed in getting upon the Federal right flank, as he attempted to do. Both armies lay very close to each other and were well entrenched. Lee was naturally strong on his right, and his left was difficult of access, sinc
W. F. Smith (search for this): chapter 6
which Grant employed and afterward regretted-General W. F. Smith was ordered to bring the Eighteenth Corps of , June 1st, the Sixth Corps arrived, followed by General Smith and ten thousand men of the Eighteenth, who had eral side. Wright lost about twelve hundred men and Smith one thousand. The following day the final disposi with the Fifth, came to his left and connected with Smith's right. Sheridan was sent to hold the lower Chickacorps, still under Anderson, was opposite Wright and Smith, while A. P. Hill, on the extreme right, confronted e by silencing batteries in their respective fronts; Smith, that he could go no farther until Wright advanced uWright, that it was impossible for him to move until Smith and Hancock advanced to his support on his right andew the fire from the positions they had gained. General Smith received a verbal order from Meade to make anothke the capture, but was unsuccessful. Thereupon General Smith and the Eighteenth Corps were despatched to Whit
G. K. Warren (search for this): chapter 6
back and severely handled at Ox Ford, Grant immediately detached a brigade each from Hancock and Warren to attack the apex of Lee's wedge on the south bank of the river, but the position was too stronside, with the Ninth Corps, was placed near Bethesda Church on the road to Mechanicsville, while Warren, with the Fifth, came to his left and connected with Smith's right. Sheridan was sent to hold tplies. On the Southern side Ewell's corps, now commanded by General Early, faced Burnside's and Warren's. Longstreet's corps, still under Anderson, was opposite Wright and Smith, while A. P. Hill, on all further offensive operations. A word remains to be said as to fortunes of Burnside's and Warren's forces, which were on the Federal right. Generals Potter and Willcox of the Ninth Corps made , when the order of suspension arrived. Early fell upon him later in the day but was repulsed. Warren, on the left of Burnside, drove Rodes' division back and repulsed Gordon's brigade, which had at
Horace Porter (search for this): chapter 6
scene Ten minutes with General Grant, June 2, 1864--the second scene Ten minutes with General Grant--the third scene It is due to the courtesy of General Horace Porter, himself an actor in these three scenes as a member of Grant's staff, that so many participants in the historic episode can here be identified. In the first picture (on the facing page) General Porter himself sits reading a newspaper on Grant's right, and on his left is General Rawlins, his chief of staff, next to Colonel Ely S. Parker. General Grant impassively listens to the report that Colonel Bowers, his adjutant-general, is reading as he stands inside the circle to the right ois the right one; on the other the heated protest of Northern press and public against what seemed so extravagant a waste of human life. The question was, as General Porter later wrote: Whether to attempt to crush Lee's army on the north side of the James, with the prospect, in case of success, of driving him into Richmond, captu
McClellan (search for this): chapter 6
kahominy, and the Fifth Corps was ordered to the rear of Cold Harbor. The Eighteenth Corps was placed along the Matadequin. Lee threatened attack on the 6th and 7th, but he soon desisted and retired to his entrenchments. The losses to the Federal army in this battle and the engagements which preceded it were over seventeen thousand, Back to the old base White House Landing, on the Pamunkey River, bustles with life in June, 1864. Once more, just before the battle of Cold Harbor, McClellan's old headquarters at the outset of the Peninsula Campaign of 1862 springs into great activity. River steamers and barges discharge their cargoes for the army that is again endeavoring to drive Lee across the Chickahominy and back upon Richmond. Grant's main reliance was upon the inexhaustible supplies which lay at the command of the North. He knew well that the decimated and impoverished South could not long hold out against the hammering which the greater abundance of Federal money an
ith General Grant, June 2, 1864--the first scene Ten minutes with General Grant, June 2, 1864--the second scene Ten minutes with General Grant--the third scene It is due to the courtesy of General Horace Porter, himself an actor in these three scenes as a member of Grant's staff, that so many participants in the historic episode can here be identified. In the first picture (on the facing page) General Porter himself sits reading a newspaper on Grant's right, and on his left is General Rawlins, his chief of staff, next to Colonel Ely S. Parker. General Grant impassively listens to the report that Colonel Bowers, his adjutant-general, is reading as he stands inside the circle to the right of the picture. In the second picture (immediately above) the General-in-Chief has arisen and walked to the left, where he leans over General Meade's shoulder and consults his map. In front of them a newly arrived officer bends forward, receiving orders or reporting. Colonel Parker has pass
Near the old Charles City Court House the crossing of the James was successfully accomplished, and on the 14th Grant took steamer and ran up the river to Bermuda Hundred to see General Butler and direct the movement against Petersburg, that began the final investment of that city. Meade issued orders for the suspension of all further offensive operations. A word remains to be said as to fortunes of Burnside's and Warren's forces, which were on the Federal right. Generals Potter and Willcox of the Ninth Corps made a quick capture of Early's advanced rifle-pits and were waiting for the order to advance on his main entrenchments, when the order of suspension arrived. Early fell upon him later in the day but was repulsed. Warren, on the left of Burnside, drove Rodes' division back and repulsed Gordon's brigade, which had attacked him. The commander of the Fifth Corps reported that his line was too extended for further operations and Birney's division was sent from the Second Co
1 2 3 4 5 6 7