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Browsing named entities in a specific section of James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Fort Gaines (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
m Tennessee captured after one of the fiercest naval battles on record. In the night, the Confederates evacuated and blew up Fort Powell. The monitor Tecumseh was blown up by a Confed. torpedo. August 6, 1864. Adml. Farragut shelled Fort Gaines, Mobile Bay. August 8, 1864. Surrender of Fort Gaines, Mobile Bay, to Adml. Farragut and Gen. Granger. August 23, 1864. Fort Morgan, Mobile Bay, surrendered unconditionally. By its surrender, Federals captured 200 prisoners anFort Gaines, Mobile Bay, to Adml. Farragut and Gen. Granger. August 23, 1864. Fort Morgan, Mobile Bay, surrendered unconditionally. By its surrender, Federals captured 200 prisoners and 60 pieces of artillery. October, 1864. October 7, 1864. Confed. cruiser Florida captured at Bahia, Bay of San Salvador, Brazil, by U. S. S. Wachusett, Commander Collins. October 27, 1864. The Confed. ram Albemarle sunk by Lieut. Cushing, in the Roanoke River. October 31, 1864. Capture of Confed. batteries and their ordnance and ordnance stores, at Plymouth, N. C. November, 1864. November 11, 1864. U. S. S. Tulip destroyed by boiler explosion off Ragged
Bermuda Hundred (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
torm through which the ship on which they stand, the Federal gunboat Agawam, passed in the spring of 1864. Their vessel was called upon to cooperate in Grant's great military movement that was to bring the war to a close. In February, Acting Rear-Admiral S. P. Lee, commanding the North Atlantic squadron, was ready to assist General Butler with gunboats in the James and York Rivers. The admiral himself remained with his main squadron at Fortress Monroe to convey Butler's expedition to Bermuda Hundred. After that general got himself bottled up and, despite the protests of Admiral Lee, had sunk obstructions in the James to prevent the Confederate gunboats from coming down, the Virginia and her consorts came down to reconnoiter the character of the obstructions. The Agawam, under Commander A. C. Rhind, was lying below Battery Dantzler, with several monitors. They were engaged by the fortification and by the Confederate gunboats concealed behind the Point. The Federal vessels prompt
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
U. S. transport Star of the West, at Indianola, by Texas troops under Col. Van Dorn. April 19, 1861. Ports of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas ordered blockaded by President Lincoln. April 20-21,batteries at Mathias Point, Va., Commander Ward of the Freeborn killed. July, 1861. July 2, 1861. U. S. S. South Carolina begins blockade of Galveston. July 4-7, 1861. U. S. S. South Carolina captures or destroys 10 vessels off GalSouth Carolina captures or destroys 10 vessels off Galveston. July 7, 1861. Infernal machines detected floating in the Potomac. July 19, 1861. Captain-General of Cuba liberated all the vessels brought into Cuban ports as prizes by Confed. cruiser Sumter. July 24, 1861. Naval excaptured by the Confederates on the north shore of Hatteras Inlet. October 4, 1861. Commander Alden, U. S. S. South Carolina, captured two schooners off the S. W. Pass of the Mississippi, with four to five thousand stands of arms. October
Stono River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ombat. Lieut.-Comdr. Buchanan was killed. January 16, 1863. Confed. cruiser Florida escaped from Mobile. January 27, 1863. First attack on Fort McAllister, Ga. January 30, 1863. U. S. gunboat Isaac Smith captured in Stono River, S. C. Discussing the plans-porter and Meade On the left sits Rear-Admiral David Dixon Porter, in conference with Major-General George Gordon Meade. There were many such interviews both on shore and aboard the Malvern before the details of n Sumter by a boat expedition. December, 1863. December 6, 1863. Monitor Weehawken founders in Charleston Harbor. Over 30 lives lost. December 5, 1863. Fight between the U. S. gunboat Marblehead and Confed. batteries on Stono River, S. C. Confederates defeated. February, 1864. February 2, 1864. Capture and destruction of U. S. S. Underwriter, Actg. Master Westervelt, by Confed. attack under Comdr. J. T. Wood, in Neuse River, N. C. February 18, 1864. Feder
Elizabeth City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ary 6, 1862. Unconditional surrender of Fort Henry to Flag-Officer Foote. February 7-10, 1862. Lieut. Phelps, of Foote's flotilla, commanding the gunboats Conestoga, Tyler and Lexington, captured Confed. gunboat Eastport and destroyed all the Confed. craft on the Tennessee River between Fort Henry and Florence, Ala. February 10, 1862. Destruction of Confed. gunboats in the Pasquotank River, N. C., also of the Confed. battery at Cobb's Point, and the occupation of Elizabeth City by Federal forces from 14 gunboats, commanded by Commander Rowan. February 14, 1862. Foote, with 6 gunboats, attacked Fort Donelson, but was repulsed, the flag-officer being severely wounded. Federal loss 60 in killed and wounded. February 28, 1862. Confed. steamer Nashville ran the blockade of Beaufort, N. C., and reached the town. March, 1862. March 1, 1862. U. S. gunboats Tyler, Lieut. Gwin, commanding, and Lexington, Lieut. Shirk, on an expedition up the T
Anacostia (United States) (search for this): chapter 15
61. Shots exchanged between U. S. S. Freeborn and Monticello and the Confed. battery at Sewell's Point, Va. U. S. S. Harriet Lane arrives off Charleston. May 26, 1861. U. S. S. Brooklyn commenced the blockade of the Mississippi River. Blockade of Mobile, Ala., commenced by U. S. S. Powhatan. May 28, 1861. U. S. S. Minnesota begins real blockade of Charleston. Blockade of Savannah initiated by U. S. gunboat Union. May 31, 1861. U. S. S. Freeborn, Anacostia, Pawnee, and Resolute attacked Confed. batteries at Aquia Creek, Va. June, 1861. June 27, 1861. Engagement between U. S. gunboats Freeborn and Reliance and Confed. batteries at Mathias Point, Va., Commander Ward of the Freeborn killed. July, 1861. July 2, 1861. U. S. S. South Carolina begins blockade of Galveston. July 4-7, 1861. U. S. S. South Carolina captures or destroys 10 vessels off Galveston. July 7, 1861. Infernal machines detected floating
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
th all the bravery in the world, as long as they did. Had he been given supreme command at the time that he was ranked by General Thomas W. Sherman and had he commanded 50,000 men instead of a small army, the Federal naval victories might have been followed up by army successes. General Gillmore conceived and superintended the construction of the fortifications at Hilton Head, and also planned the operations that resulted in the capture of Fort Pulaski. Transferred to western Virginia and Kentucky, and brevetted for gallantry, he once more returned to the coast as commander of the Department of South Carolina, where he succeeded General Hunter. It was greatly through his efforts that Forts Wagner and Gregg, near Charleston Harbor, were finally silenced. During the latter part of the war he was successively in command of the Tenth and Nineteenth Army Corps. April 11, 1862. Confed. steamers Merrimac, Jamestown, and Yorktown, came down between Newport News and Sewell's Point
Richmond, La. (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
, on the Ogeechee River, Ga., by Federal gunboats repulsed. August, 1862. August 6, 1862. Destruction of Confed. ram Arkansas by her commander, Lieut. Stevens, at Baton Rouge, La. August 16, 1862. Lieut.-Comdr. Phelps with 3 gunboats and 4 rams, and the 58th and 76th Ohio in transports, left Helena, Ark., sailed down the Mississippi to Milliken's Bend, where they captured the steamer Fairplay, with arms, &c., for 6000 men. Further captures made at Haynes' Bluff and at Richmond, La., and property destroyed. September, 1862. September 5, 1862. Ship Ocmulgee burned at sea by Confed. cruiser Alabama. September 17, 1862. U. S. gunboats Paul Jones, Cimarron, and 3 other vessels attacked Confed. batteries on St. John's River, Florida. September 25, 1862. Sabine Pass, Texas, captured by U. S. steamer Kensington and schooner Rachel Seaman. October, 1862. October 3, 1862. Confed. fortifications at St. John's Bluff, on St. John's River,
Colorado (Colorado, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
Hatteras Inlet, N. C., 30 pieces of cannon, 1000 stand of arms, 3 vessels with valuable cargoes, and 750 prisoners were taken. August 30, 1861. Capt. Foote ordered to the command of U. S. naval forces on the Western waters. September, 1861. September 4, 1861. Engagement on the Mississippi River near Hickman, Ky., between U. S. gunboats Tyler and Lexington and the Confed. gunboat Yankee and shore batteries. September 14, 1861. An expedition from the U. S. frigate Colorado, under Lieut. J. H. Russell, destroyed the privateer Judah, under the Confed. guns at Pensacola. September 16, 1861. A naval expedition from Hatteras Inlet, under command of Lieut. J. Y. Maxwell, destroyed Fort Ocracoke, on Beacon Island, N. C. September 17, 1861. Ship Island, near the mouth of the Mississippi River, occupied by Federal forces from the steamer Massachusetts. October, 1861. October 1, 1861. U. S. steamer Fanny, with 35 men of the 9th N. Y. Volunte
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ver. Blockade of Mobile, Ala., commenced by U. S. S. Powhatan. May 28, 1861. U. S. S. Minnesota begins real blockade of Charleston. Blockade of Savannah initiated by U. S. gunboat Union. May 31, 1861. U. S. S. Freeborn, Anacostia, Pawnee, and Resolute attacked Confed. batteries at Aquia Creek, Va. Junion of Gen. Phelps, attached to Gen. Butler's expedition, on occupation of Ship Island, Mississippi Sound. December 17, 1861. Entrance to the harbor at Savannah, Ga., blocked by sinking 7 vessels laden with stone. December 20, 1861. The main ship-channel at Charleston Harbor was obstructed by sinking 16 vessels of tg or was supposed to lend assistance. Had many of this splendid officer's suggestions been adopted, and had he received better military support from Washington, Savannah and Charleston could not by any possibility have held out, with all the bravery in the world, as long as they did. Had he been given supreme command at the time
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