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ers to march on the 3d of June, the division was put in motion early on the morning of the 4th, and after marching some sixteen miles, bivouacked two miles north of Spotsylvania courthouse. Next day, after a march of twenty-one miles, turning to the right at Verdiersville, in order to cross the Rapidan at Racoon or Sommerville ford, we bivouacked near Old Verdiersville. After marching about four miles on the 6th, I received orders to halt and wait further orders. Resuming the march on the 7th, we crossed the Rapidan at Sommerville ford, passed through Culpeper courthouse, and bivouacked four miles beyond, on the Rixeyville road, having marched about nineteen miles. On the 8th, finding that a long march was ahead of us, and that the supplies had to be closely looked to, I ordered all the baggage, tents, &c., that could be spared to be sent to the rear. By this means each brigade was enabled to transport three days rations in its train, in addition to an equal amount in the div
rived at Hagerstown soon after the passage of the train, and found a heavy force of the enemy's cavalry driving back our cavalry through the streets. Making a hasty but skillful disposition of his troops, he soon routed them, capturing a considerable number. Great credit is due Brigadier-General Iverson for the handsome and prompt manner in which this affair was managed. On the night of the 4th we began to fall back towards Hagerstown, by way of Fairfield, bivouacking on the night of the 5th, after a most wearisome march in mud and rain, two miles west of Fairfield. On the morning of the 6th my division became the rear guard of the army, and early in the morning was attacked by the enemy's skirmishers, deployed over a line extending entirely across the valley, and therefore fully one and a half or two miles long. Later it was attacked from the Emmetsburg road. The morning attack was sharply repulsed by General Daniel's skirmishers on the left and General Doles' on the right
illery, composed of Carter's, Page's, Fry's and Reese's batteries. Receiving orders to march on the 3d of June, the division was put in motion early on the morning of the 4th, and after marching some sixteen miles, bivouacked two miles north of Spotsylvania courthouse. Next day, after a march of twenty-one miles, turning to the right at Verdiersville, in order to cross the Rapidan at Racoon or Sommerville ford, we bivouacked near Old Verdiersville. After marching about four miles on the 6th, I received orders to halt and wait further orders. Resuming the march on the 7th, we crossed the Rapidan at Sommerville ford, passed through Culpeper courthouse, and bivouacked four miles beyond, on the Rixeyville road, having marched about nineteen miles. On the 8th, finding that a long march was ahead of us, and that the supplies had to be closely looked to, I ordered all the baggage, tents, &c., that could be spared to be sent to the rear. By this means each brigade was enabled to t
an occasional artillery fire. The enemy made during the day several ineffectual efforts, by advancing heavy lines of skirmishers, equal almost, if not fully, to my main line and using their artillery to dislodge them from their position. On the 3d, my orders were general, and the same as those of the day before, and accordingly when the heavy cannonade indicated that another attack was made from the right wing of our army, we were on the lookout for another favorable opportunity to co-operatnstant and skillful in their attentions. They underwent this terrible trial, not only without murmuring or faltering, but with great cheerfulness, and with the utmost coolness. It is proper to mention that during the night of the 2d, and on the 3d, my troops did not occupy any portion of the town, except that still held by the sharpshooters of the Alabama brigade, under that promising young officer Major Blackford, of the Fifth Alabama. These sharpshooters, together with those of Doles', Iv
nd Lieutenant-Colonel Thos. H. Carter's battalion of sixteen pieces of artillery, composed of Carter's, Page's, Fry's and Reese's batteries. Receiving orders to march on the 3d of June, the division was put in motion early on the morning of the 4th, and after marching some sixteen miles, bivouacked two miles north of Spotsylvania courthouse. Next day, after a march of twenty-one miles, turning to the right at Verdiersville, in order to cross the Rapidan at Racoon or Sommerville ford, we biof the 4th. We were not disturbed, however, in the least during the day; in fact, the enemy exhibited so small a force, entered the town and followed us at so late an hour, that it was generally believed he had retreated. During the day of the 4th, all the wounded who could walk, or be transported in wagons and ambulances, were sent to the rear — many, as it turned out, to be captured or sacrificed in the effort to escape the enemy's cavalry — but near one-half of them, say about 760, were
n that campaign. We are sure that many inquirers after the truth of history will thank us for giving (for the first time) to the world this report of the accomplished soldier, whose gallantry and skill won for him so high a reputation, and whose death on the field at Winchester was lamented as a sad loss to the army, and to the Confederacy. We hope hereafter to publish others of the more important reports of this great campaign.] Report.headquarters Rodes' division, Orange C. H., 1863. Lt. Col. A. S. Pendleton, A. A. General Second Army Corps: Colonel — In compliance with orders, I have the honor here — with to submit a report of the operations of this division during the period which elapsed from the breaking up of camp at Grace church, in Caroline county, to its return to the Rappahannock waters. During this period the division was organized as follows: Daniel's North Carolina brigade, commanded by Brigadier-General Junius Daniel, composed of the following regiment
ne hundred guns; a most trying position even when the opposing artillerists confined their attention to each other, and one which became fearfully so, when both parties, as they did at short intervals, dropped shells in their midst, whilst the sharpshooters were constant and skillful in their attentions. They underwent this terrible trial, not only without murmuring or faltering, but with great cheerfulness, and with the utmost coolness. It is proper to mention that during the night of the 2d, and on the 3d, my troops did not occupy any portion of the town, except that still held by the sharpshooters of the Alabama brigade, under that promising young officer Major Blackford, of the Fifth Alabama. These sharpshooters, together with those of Doles', Iverson's and Ramseur's brigades, annoyed the enemy's artillery and infantry constantly during the period of our occupation of the town, and acted with rare and praiseworthy gallantry. During the night of the 3d my division fell back
The conduct of the troops of this division was entirely in accordance with those orders, and challenged the admiration of their commanding officers, whilst it astonished the people along the line of march. These latter, very generally, expected to be treated by us with the wanton cruelty generally exhibited by their troops when they are upon our soil. As a general rule, they apparently expected to see their houses burned down, and all their property carried off or destroyed. From the 23d of June the movements of my command were executed under the immediate supervision of the commander of the corps. Resuming its march on the 24th, the division made fourteen miles, passing through Chambersburg, which had been reoccupied by General Jenkins that morning, and bivouacked on the Conococheague, two and a half miles beyond the town. The Third Alabama regiment, Colonel Battle commanding, was left in the town as a guard for the people, property, &c. At Chambersburg the division of Ge
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