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J. M. Stone (search for this): chapter 5.41
from their officers, and this state of things continued until night. In some instances guards were refused. Papers and property of great value were in the vaults of the city banks, while the apartments above and in the rear were occupied by women and children, with their food and clothing. For a guard to protect them application was made by one of our worthiest and most respectable citizens, Edwin J. Scott, Esq., first to the general officer who had received the surrender of the town, Colonel Stone, and then to the Provost-Marshal, Major Jenkins. The response made to the applicant by the former officer, though standing idly in the crowd, was that he had no time to attend to him, and the answer of the latter was, I cannot undertake to protect private property. Between 2 and 3 o'clock P. M. General Sherman in person rode into Columbia, informed the Mayor that his letter had been received and promised protection to the town. Extraordinary license was allowed to the soldiers by Gene
A. B. Howard (search for this): chapter 5.41
in the possession of the committee: As well as I recollect, in November, 1865, I went in company with a friend to see General Howard at his headquarters, in Charleston, on matters of business. Before we left, the conversation turned on the destruction of Columbia. General Howard expressed his regret at the occurrence, and added the following words: Though General Sherman did not order the burning of the town, yet somehow or other the men had taken up the idea that if they destroyed the capitalf on our way home talked the mater over, and could not but be struck by the two following facts: First, that although General Howard said that General Sherman did not order the burning, he did not state that General Sherman gave orders that the city reference was previously made (Mrs. L. S. McCord), at the request of a friend having undertaken to present a paper to General Howard, sought an interview with that officer--second in command of the invading army — and found General Sherman with him.
Edward J. Scott (search for this): chapter 5.41
ed to and her family. I saw, says a witness (John McKenzie, Esq.), fire-balls thrown out of the wagons against Hon. W. F. Desaussures' house, but without doing any damage. No other fires in the town occurred until after night, when the general conflagration began. As already stated, the wind blew from the west, but the fires after night broke out first on the west of Main and Sumter streets, and to windward of where the cotton bales were placed. The cotton, it is testified and proved (Ed. J. Scott, Esq.), instead of burning the houses, was burned by them. General Sherman, as has been shown, on the night of the 17th of February, and while the town was in flames, ascribed the burning of Columbia to the intoxication of his soldiers and to no other cause. On the following day, the 18th of February, the lady to whom reference was previously made (Mrs. L. S. McCord), at the request of a friend having undertaken to present a paper to General Howard, sought an interview with that offic
visit, expressed his regret at the burning of our convent, disclaimed the act, attributing it to the intoxication of his soldiers, and told me to choose any house in town for a convent and it should be ours. He deputed his Adjutant-General, Colonel Ewing, to act in his stead. Colonel Ewing reminded us of General Sherman's offer to give us any house in Columbia we might choose for a convent. We have thought of it, said we, and of asking for General Preston's house, which is large. That is wColonel Ewing reminded us of General Sherman's offer to give us any house in Columbia we might choose for a convent. We have thought of it, said we, and of asking for General Preston's house, which is large. That is where General Logan holds his headquarters, said he, and orders have already been given, I know, to burn it on tomorrow morning; but if you say you will take it for a convent, I will speak to the General and the order will be countermanded. On the following morning, after many inquiries, we learned from the officer in charge (General Perry, I think) that his orders were to fire it unless the Sisters were in actual possession of it, but if even a detachment of Sisters were in it, it should be sp
L. Catherine Joyner (search for this): chapter 5.41
ers to certain declarations of General Sherman himself, widely circulated through the public press, and to the ravages of his army in this State after their departure from Columbia; matters of such notoriety as, in the judgment of the committee, to dispense with the necessity of formal proof. The forces of General Sherman's command while in Georgia seem to have anticipated that their next march would be through South Carolina. Their temper and feeling toward our people, a witness, Mrs. L. Catherine Joyner, thus describes: The soldiers were universal in their threats. They seemed to gloat over the distress that would result from their march through the State. I conversed with numbers of all grades belonging to the Fourteenth and Twentieth corps. Such expressions as the following were of hourly occurrence: Carolina may well fear us; she brought this war on, and shall pay the penalty. You think Georgia has suffered; just wait until we get into Carolina; every man, woman and child ma
L. S. McCord (search for this): chapter 5.41
distinct and frequent notice to the citizens of their impending calamity, usually in the form of fierce and direct threats, but, occasionally, as if in kindly forewarning. A lady of rare worth and intelligence, and of high social position, Mrs. L. S. McCord, relates the following incident: One of my maids brought me a paper, left, she told me, by a Yankee soldier; it was an ill-spelled but kindly warning of the horrors to come, written upon a torn sheet of my dead son's note-book, which, with the 17th of February, and while the town was in flames, ascribed the burning of Columbia to the intoxication of his soldiers and to no other cause. On the following day, the 18th of February, the lady to whom reference was previously made (Mrs. L. S. McCord), at the request of a friend having undertaken to present a paper to General Howard, sought an interview with that officer--second in command of the invading army — and found General Sherman with him. The narrative of a part of the intervie
ressed his regret at the burning of our convent, disclaimed the act, attributing it to the intoxication of his soldiers, and told me to choose any house in town for a convent and it should be ours. He deputed his Adjutant-General, Colonel Ewing, to act in his stead. Colonel Ewing reminded us of General Sherman's offer to give us any house in Columbia we might choose for a convent. We have thought of it, said we, and of asking for General Preston's house, which is large. That is where General Logan holds his headquarters, said he, and orders have already been given, I know, to burn it on tomorrow morning; but if you say you will take it for a convent, I will speak to the General and the order will be countermanded. On the following morning, after many inquiries, we learned from the officer in charge (General Perry, I think) that his orders were to fire it unless the Sisters were in actual possession of it, but if even a detachment of Sisters were in it, it should be spared on thei
P. J. Shand (search for this): chapter 5.41
wanted, and throw the remainder into the flames. Men were violently seized and threatened with the halter or pistol to compel them to disclose where their gold or silver was concealed. The revered and beloved pastor of one of our churches, Rev. P. J. Shand, states that in the midst and during the progress of the appalling calamity, above all other noises might be heard the demoniac and gladsome shouts of the soldiery. Driven from his home by the flames, with the aid of a servant he was bearinty of a personage not less distinguished than the officer of highest rank in the army of the invaders next after the Commander-in-Chief himself. The proof is beyond impeachment. It comes from the honored pastor of one of our city churches, Rev. P. J. Shand, to whom reference has already been made, and it is thus expressed in his written statement in the possession of the committee: As well as I recollect, in November, 1865, I went in company with a friend to see General Howard at his headquart
M. C. Butler (search for this): chapter 5.41
urpose of surrendering the city to General Sherman. Acting in concert with the Mayor, the officer in command of the rear guard of the Confederate cavalry, General M. C. Butler, forbore from further resistance to the advance of the opposing army, and took effectual precautions against anything being done which might provoke Generary throughout their march through South and North Carolina. The general officer commanding the division forming the rear guard of the Confederate cavalry (General M. C. Butler) deposes: That he was personally present with the rear squadron of his division; that Lieutenant-General Wade Hampton withdrew simultaneously with him, witlf. It is sustained by the testimony of the officer, high in rank, but higher still in character, who commanded the rear guard of the Confederate cavalry (General M. C. Butler), and is concurred in by other witnesses, comprising officers, clergymen and citizens — witnesses of such repute and in such numbers as to render the proof
ntinued until night. In some instances guards were refused. Papers and property of great value were in the vaults of the city banks, while the apartments above and in the rear were occupied by women and children, with their food and clothing. For a guard to protect them application was made by one of our worthiest and most respectable citizens, Edwin J. Scott, Esq., first to the general officer who had received the surrender of the town, Colonel Stone, and then to the Provost-Marshal, Major Jenkins. The response made to the applicant by the former officer, though standing idly in the crowd, was that he had no time to attend to him, and the answer of the latter was, I cannot undertake to protect private property. Between 2 and 3 o'clock P. M. General Sherman in person rode into Columbia, informed the Mayor that his letter had been received and promised protection to the town. Extraordinary license was allowed to the soldiers by General Sherman. On the afternoon of the 17th of
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