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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Frank P. Gracey (search for this): chapter 5.47
s deserted by her crew. General Buford's trouble and anxiety to secure this valuable prize was soon relieved by Captain Frank P. Gracey, a gallant artillery officer, temporarily attached to Lyon's brigade, who offered to swim the river and bring thrivate T. H. Sack Moore, of Morton's battery, dropping the equipments of the cannoneer, followed the noble example of Captain Gracey, threw themselves into the water and swam the swollen stream, reaching the Mazeppa just after Captain Gracey had takeCaptain Gracey had taken possession of her. A yawl was lowered, into which was placed a coil of rope, one end being attached to the Mazeppa. This was quickly carried to the opposite shore, where many willing hands were ready to draw the steamer across the river. General ing of my guns on land, but was not familiar with naval affairs. After some consultation, remembering having seen Captain F. P. Gracey's daring aquatic feat at old Fort Heiman a few days before, and knowing the Captain to be a gallant and skilled ar
T. Saunders Sale (search for this): chapter 5.47
ing and the mouth of Sandy, the former place some five miles distant by river from the latter, as the most available from which to obstruct the navigation of the Tennessee river and cut off communication with Johnsonville. These points were admirably suited to entrap any passing boat from above or below. Lieutenant W. O. Hunter's section — Walton's battery — of twenty-pounder Parrotts under the personal command of Captain E. S. Walton, was placed in the upper fort at Fort Heiman. Lieutenant T. S. Sale's section (Sale had been left sick in Mississippi)--Morton's battery — in charge of Lieutenant J. W. Brown, was placed on the river bank some 800 yards below Hunter's position, both sections being supported by General H. B. Lyon's brigade of cavalry. Lieutenant Joe M. Mason's section (Mason had been left sick at Jackson, Tenn.)--Morton's battery--Sergeant Lemuel Zarring in charge, was placed in position at Paris Landing, and Lieutenant Trantham's section — Walton's battery--Sergean
Raid of Forrest's cavalry on the Tennessee river in 1864. By Captain John W. Morton, Chief of Artillery in Forrest's Cavalry Corps [Read before the Louisville Branch of the Southern Historical Society.] Two batteries of the battalion of artillery, Forrest's Cavalry Corps, which I had the honor to command, namely, Walton's and Morton's, the former composed of two ten-pounder and two twenty-pounder Parrott guns which had been captured from the enemy by Forrest's cavalry, and the latter composed of four three-inch steel-rifled Rodman guns, which had also been captured by our command, reached the the mouth of the Sandy on the evening of October 28, 1864, accompanied by Buford's division of cavalry. This raid was evidently intended to delay the concentration of troops and stores by the Federals at Nashville, and to assist General Hood in his advance into Middle Tennessee. After a careful reconnoissance by General Buford of the river front for several miles above and also below t
iked and another had a shell lodged in its bore from one of our guns, which broke a trunion plate, partially dismounting her. There were fifteen of her crew killed and wounded, the Captain among the killed. The Venus was intact as to machinery and hull, although, out of a detachment of infantry she had on board, ten had been killed and wounded and ten were made prisoners. The barges were emptied of their stores and destroyed. General Forrest arriving upon the ground on the morning of the 31st, energetically pushed the preparations for the contemplated attack on the depot at Johnsonville. General Forrest, sending for me, ordered that I should have the gunboat overhauled, armament repaired, and take charge of the fleet. I readily assented to putting the armament in condition, but begged to be excused from commanding the fleet. I told the General that I could trust to the handling of my guns on land, but was not familiar with naval affairs. After some consultation, remembering ha
f the Paris Landing battery, while repairing damages in the hull and machinery, which could be distinctly heard by Bell's sharp-shooters. It was subsequently ascertained that the white flag was raised by the wife of the Captain of the gunboat, who had been killed, and was snatched down by the second officer in command. The men at Zarring's guns, having a commanding position, fought continuously for over an hour, and advanced their pieces by hand for nearly a mile; although on a chilly October day, with the sun obscured by hanging clouds, the men becoming exhausted from hard physical effort, would for a moment drop from their posts and crawl to the river's edge to bathe their burning brows and quench their thirst with the muddy water of the turbid stream. This was certainly a remarkable contest, when we consider the consternation and panic usually produced amongst troops upon the appearance of Federal gunboats, and especially to those unaccustomed to gunboat warfare. Lieutenant
October 28th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 5.47
sville Branch of the Southern Historical Society.] Two batteries of the battalion of artillery, Forrest's Cavalry Corps, which I had the honor to command, namely, Walton's and Morton's, the former composed of two ten-pounder and two twenty-pounder Parrott guns which had been captured from the enemy by Forrest's cavalry, and the latter composed of four three-inch steel-rifled Rodman guns, which had also been captured by our command, reached the the mouth of the Sandy on the evening of October 28, 1864, accompanied by Buford's division of cavalry. This raid was evidently intended to delay the concentration of troops and stores by the Federals at Nashville, and to assist General Hood in his advance into Middle Tennessee. After a careful reconnoissance by General Buford of the river front for several miles above and also below the mouth of Sandy, we selected the old Confederate Fort Heiman and Paris Landing and the mouth of Sandy, the former place some five miles distant by river fr
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