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A. Lincoln (search for this): chapter 18
ll orders necessary according to the views the Executive may take, and influence him, if possible, not to vary the terms at all, for I have considered every thing, and believe that the Confederate armies once dispersed, we can adjust all else fairly and well. It is now known, from documents which might have slept but for General Sherman's revival of this matter, that the members of Jeff. Davis' Cabinet construed the Sherman-Johnston terms exactly as Mr. Stanton and the other members of Lincoln's Cabinet did. It has already been made to appear that Mr. Reagan, the Confederate Postmaster-General; Mr. Breckinridge, Secretary--of War; Wade Hampton, and General Johnston held a consultation at the headquarters of the latter, late at night, after the first conference with General Sherman. Up to that time no draft of terms had been prepared by either side, and Mr. Reagan thereupon drew up outlines, based upon Johnston's conversations with Sherman, and this paper was the next day hand
H. W. Halleck (search for this): chapter 18
irs, returns with increased violence to his old attack upon Secretary Stanton, and attempts to hold him chiefly responsible for a course in regard to the Sherman-Johnston terms, which at the time was approved by the President, General Grant, General Halleck, every member of the Cabinet, and by the loyal North. He attempts to convey the impression that Mr. Stanton exceeded his authority in the matter, by the statement that President Johnson, and nearly all the members of the Cabinet assured hs directed at the reasons assigned by Mr. Stanton for the rejection of his terms. He contends that personally he cared very little whether they were approved, modified, or disapproved in toto, only he wanted instructions; and yet in a letter to Halleck, quoted in the Memoirs, and written the day these terms were agreed upon, is this appeal: Please give all orders necessary according to the views the Executive may take, and influence him, if possible, not to vary the terms at all, for I hav
M. Stanton (search for this): chapter 18
ncreased violence to his old attack upon Secretary Stanton, and attempts to hold him chiefly respon He attempts to convey the impression that Mr. Stanton exceeded his authority in the matter, by thal in Washington, that they knew nothing of Mr. Stanton's publications setting forth the nature of in rejecting the terms on the grounds which Mr. Stanton made known. It is doubtless true that none of them, except Mr. Stanton, knew that these reasons were to be made public in the shape they werethink he afterward did, by refusing to take Mr. Stanton's hand, or as he expresses it, speaking of ach member of the Cabinet. As I approached Mr. Stanton, he offered me his hand, but I declined itaint is directed at the reasons assigned by Mr. Stanton for the rejection of his terms. He contendtrued the Sherman-Johnston terms exactly as Mr. Stanton and the other members of Lincoln's Cabinet Sherman terms as preliminary, and held, as Mr. Stanton said our Cabinet did, that subsequently a c
April 22nd, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 18
ow both interesting and pertinent to the questions General Sherman has raised, is as follows: Views of Postmaster-General Reagan: Charlotte, N. C., April 22, 1865. To the President. Sir—In obedience to your request for the opinions in writing of the members of the Cabinet on the questions: first, as to whether you members of the Davis Cabinet, submitted in writing at the same time, were as follows: Views of Mr. Benjamin, Secretary of State: Charlotte, N. C., 22d April, 1865. To the President. Sir: I have the honor to submit this paper as the advice in writing which you requested from the heads of the departments of the Governeration. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, S. R. Mallory, Secretary of the Navy. Views of Attorney-General Davis: Charlotte, N. C., 22d April, 1865. To the President. Sir: The questions submitted by you to the members of your Cabinet for their opinions are: 1. Whether the convention agreed upon on
April 24th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 18
e, and should resign a trust which it is no longer possible to fulfill. He should further invite the several States to take into immediate consideration the terms of this convention, with a view to their adoption and execution as being the best and most favorable that they could hope to obtain by a continuance of the struggle. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of State. Views of Mr. Mallory, Secretary of the Navy: Charlotte, N. C., 24th April, 1865. Mr. President: In compliance with your suggestion I have the honor briefly to present the following views upon the propositions discussed in Cabinet council yesterday. These propositions, agreed upon and signed by General Joseph E. Johnston and W. T. Sherman, may fairly be regarded as providing for the immediate cessation of hostilities, the disbandment of our armies, and the return of our soldiers to the peaceful walks of life; the restoration of the several States of our Con
t on the questions: first, as to whether you should assent to the preliminary agreement of the 18th inst., between General Joseph E. Johnston, of the Confederate army, and Major-General W. T. Sherman,embers of your Cabinet for their opinions are: 1. Whether the convention agreed upon on the 18th inst., by and between General Johnston, commanding the Confederate forces, and Major-General Sherman advice as to the course you should take upon the memorandum or basis of agreement made on the 18th inst. by and between General J. E. Johnston, of the Confederate States Army, and Major-General W. T.pt steps should be taken to put an end to the war. It may be said that the agreement of the 18th inst. contains certain stipulations which you can not perform. This is true, and it was well unde advise: 1. That you execute, so far as you can, the second article in the agreement of the 18th inst. 2. That you recommend to the several States the acceptance of those parts of the agreement
ve us to war by their unconstitutional and unjust aggressions, and who will now add the consciousness of power to their love of dominion and greed of gain. It is right also for me to say that much as we have been exhausted in men and resources, I am of opinion that if our people could be induced to continue the contest with the spirit which animated them during the first years of the war, our independence might yet be within our reach. But I see no reason to hope for that now. On the second question, as to the proper mode of executing the agreement, I have to say that whatever you may do looking to the termination of the contest by an amicable arrangement which may embrace the extinction of the Government of the Confederate States, must be done without special authority to be found in the Constitution. And yet, I am of opinion that, charged as you are with the duty of looking to the general welfare of the people, and without time or opportunity, under the peculiarity and neces
April 23rd, 1866 AD (search for this): chapter 18
atification of the convention by the Executive of the United States, you issue your proclamation, plainly setting forth the circumstances which have induced you to assent to the terms proposed, disbanding the armies of the Confederacy, resigning your office as chief magistrate, and recommending to the people of the States that they assemble in convention and carry into effect the terms agreed on. George Davis. Views of Mr. Breckinridge, Secretary of War: Charlotte, N. C., April 23, 1866. To His Excellency the President. Sir: In obedience to your request I have the honor to submit my advice as to the course you should take upon the memorandum or basis of agreement made on the 18th inst. by and between General J. E. Johnston, of the Confederate States Army, and Major-General W. T. Sherman, of the United States Army, provided that paper shall receive the approval of the Government of the United States. The principal army of the Confederacy was recently lost in Virgi
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