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has been torn down; and, besides, transportation from barracks to pier at Sheridan would necessarily be slow. They can be brought from Sheridan to Lake Front direct by rail, and disembark on grounds, thus avoiding marching through city. Suggest the latter plan as best, especially as rail transportation is now at the post sufficient to bring the whole command—infantry, artillery, and cavalry—as soon as they can be loaded on cars at that point. Martin, Asst. Adjt.-Genl. (in absence of Major-Genl. Comdg.). (Telegram.) Washington, D. C., July 3, 1894, four o'clock P. M. To Martin, Adjutant-General, Hdqrs. Dept. of the Missouri, Chicago, Ills. It having become impracticable, in the judgment of the President, to enforce, by ordinary course of judicial proceedings, the laws of the United States, you will direct Colonel Crofton to move his entire command at once to the city of Chicago, leaving the necessary guard at Fort Sheridan, there to execute the orders and processes o
as resumed throughout all that vast region of country as rapidly as trains conveying troops could be moved. No serious opposition or resistance was offered anywhere. (Telegram.) Headquarters of the army, Washington, July 7, 1894. brigadier-General Otis, Commanding Department of the Columbia, Vancouver Barracks, Washington: In view of the fact, as substantiated by communications received from the Department of Justice, from military official reports, and from other reliable sources, truction to the regular and orderly operation of said road for postal, military, naval, and all other government service. J. M. Schofield, Major-General Commanding. (Telegram.) Headquarters of the army, Washington, July 7, 1894. brigadier-General Otis, Commanding Department of the Columbia, Vancouver Barracks, Washington: The order of the President sent you this morning by telegraph is the same in substance as one sent last night to General Merritt, the purpose being to extend mili
Eugene V. Debs (search for this): chapter 28
he Lake Shore and Rock Island railroads before my arrival, and others are desired at South Chicago. I have directed all commanding officers not to allow crowds or mobs to congregate about the commands in a menacing or threatening manner, and to keep out pickets and guards; and, after due warning, if the mobs approach the commands in a threatening manner, they must be dispersed, even if firearms have to be used. A large number of men in the city are wearing white ribbon, the color ordered by Debs to indicate their allegiance to his orders. Owing to the feeling of feverish excitement in the city, and the large number of unoccupied, the condition to-day is more critical than at any other time. Most of the roads are moving mail and passenger trains. All of the roads will attempt to move their trains to-morrow morning. Sufficient number of men are available and anxious to work to take the place of all the strikers, provided proper protection can be given them. Seven roads have moved
Atty Olney (search for this): chapter 28
o suppress disorder, protect property, and execute the laws. The city police were utterly powerless in such an emergency, and deputy United States marshals, though employed without limit as to numbers, were no more effective. The State militia were not called out in time to meet the emergency. Hence nothing remained but for the National Government to exercise the military power conferred upon it by the Constitution and laws, so far as the same were applicable. See the report of Attorney-General Olney, December 1, 1894, p. 31. Fortunately, the acts of Congress passed in pursuance of the Constitution, although never before made effective in a similar case, were found to give ample authority for the action then required. Fortunately, also, the wise foresight of the government in establishing a large military post at Fort Sheridan, near Chicago, made a regiment of infantry, a squadron of cavalry, and a battery of artillery immediately available for service in that city. But, unfort
rtin, Adjutant-General, Hdqrs. Dept. of the Missouri, Chicago, Ills. It having become impracticable, in the judgment of the President, to enforce, by ordinary course of judicial proceedings, the laws of the United States, you will direct Colonel Crofton to move his entire command at once to the city of Chicago, leaving the necessary guard at Fort Sheridan, there to execute the orders and processes of the United States Court, to prevent the obstruction of the United States mails, and generalowledge receipt, and report action promptly. By order of the President: J. M. Schofield, Major-General. (Telegram.) Chicago, Ills., July 4, 1894. Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.: At ten-fifteen this morning Colonel Crofton reports his command in the city; located, infantry at Blue Island and Grand Crossing, cavalry and artillery at stock-yards; cannot learn that anything definite has been accomplished, but there has been no active trouble. People appear to fe
John M. Schofield (search for this): chapter 28
the movement. Acknowledge receipt, and report in what manner the movement is to be made. J. M. Schofield, Major-General Commanding. (Telegram.) Chicago, Illinois, July 2, 1894. Adjutantl counsel. Acknowledge receipt, and report action promptly. By order of the President: J. M. Schofield, Major-General. (Telegram.) Chicago, Ills., July 4, 1894. Adjutant-General U. S. and good order in the city is, of course, the province of the city and State authorities. J. M. Schofield, Major-General Commanding. (Telegram.) Chicago, Ills., July 6, 1894. Adjutant-Gederly operation of said road for postal, military, naval, and all other government service. J. M. Schofield, Major-General Commanding. (Telegram.) Headquarters of the army, Washington, July h other, so that the troops may return to their proper stations without unnecessary delay. J. M. Schofield, Major-General Commanding. by the President of the United States of America. A
ng movement was in action I withdrew some of the troops on the outskirts of the city, and in the evening the battery and one troop of cavalry, to the Lake Front Park, for the purpose of attacking the mob should it reach the vicinity of the government building between Adams and Jackson sts. During the afternoon, night, and this morning I have concentrated nine (9) companies infantry, troop cavalry, and the battery of artillery on the Lake Front Park. This includes troops from Leavenworth and Brady. During last night a proclamation was issued by the mayor directing the police to disperse mobs and prevent the lawless from interfering with railroads. If this order is executed there will be no further trouble. One engineer has been stoned to death. During the night a dozen fires were started in different places, but destroying very little property, except the principal buildings of the World's Fair and more than a hundred cars; this morning a mob has gathered near the stock-yards in a
George D. Ruggles (search for this): chapter 28
omptly suppress all resistance to lawful authority, and to stop the destruction of life the moment lawless resistance has ceased. Punishment belongs not to the troops, but to the courts of justice. By command of Major-General Schofield: Geo. D. Ruggles, Adjutant-General. (General orders, no. 15.) Headquarters of the army, adjutant-General's office, Washington, May 25, 1894. The following instructions are issued for the government of department commanders: Whenever the troop to their military superiors. Any unlawful or unauthorized act on their part would not be excusable on the ground of any order or request received by them from a marshal or any other civil officer. By command of Major-General Schofield: Geo. D. Ruggles, Adjutant-General. It appears to have been thought in Chicago that the request of the United States marshal, with whom the commanding officer of the troops had been directed to confer, was equivalent to orders of the War Department, no
Walter Q. Gresham (search for this): chapter 28
. Done at the city of Washington, this eighth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninetyfour, and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and nineteenth. Grover Cleveland. By the President: W. Q. Gresham, Secretary of State. (General orders, no. 6.) headquarters Department of the Missouri, Chicago, Illinois, July 9, 1894. To all United States troops serving in the Department of the Missouri. The acts of violence committed dury to their respective abodes on or before three o'clock in the afternoon on the tenth day of July instant. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal of the United States to be hereto affixed. Done at the city of Washington, this ninth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-four, and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and nineteenth. Grover Cleveland. By the President: W. Q. Gresham, Secretary of State.
Nelson A. Miles (search for this): chapter 28
ops in the City of Chicago orders sent to General Miles, and his reports the proclamation of the , showed that the department commander, Major-General Miles, was not in Chicago, and the adjutant-g his presence was needed with his command, General Miles said he was subject to orders, but that insident approved my further suggestion that General Miles should return at once to his command. The correction some time after the arrival of General Miles in Chicago. The garrison of Fort Sheridr to feel easier since arrival of troops. General Miles is expected to arrive in city within an hohicago, at this time would be desirable. Nelson A. Miles, Major-General Commanding. Addition government any additional instructions? Nelson A. Miles, Major-General Commanding. (Telon, D. C., July 5, 1894, 10:15 P. M. To Major-General Miles, Headquarters Department of the Missour peace and good order. By command of Major-General Miles: J. P. Martin, Assistant Adjutant-Gen
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