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Grover Cleveland (search for this): chapter 28
dent has employed a part of the military forces of the United States: Now, therefore, I, Grover Cleveland, President of the United States, do hereby admonish all good citizens and all persons who mninetyfour, and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and nineteenth. Grover Cleveland. By the President: W. Q. Gresham, Secretary of State. (General orders, no. 6.) them. At the time of the massacre of Chinese laborers at Rock Springs, Wyoming, during President Cleveland's first administration, I was ordered by the President to go to that place from Chicago adent has employed a part of the military forces of the United States: Now, therefore, I, Grover Cleveland, President of the United States, do hereby command all persons engaged in, or in any way cord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-four, and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and nineteenth. Grover Cleveland. By the President: W. Q. Gresham, Secretary of State.
Edwin Walker (search for this): chapter 28
urse of judicial proceedings, the laws of the United States, you will direct Colonel Crofton to move his entire command at once to the city of Chicago, leaving the necessary guard at Fort Sheridan, there to execute the orders and processes of the United States Court, to prevent the obstruction of the United States mails, and generally to enforce the faithful execution of the laws of the United States. He will confer with the United States marshal, the United States district attorney, and Edwin Walker, special counsel. Acknowledge receipt, and report action promptly. By order of the President: J. M. Schofield, Major-General. (Telegram.) Chicago, Ills., July 4, 1894. Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.: At ten-fifteen this morning Colonel Crofton reports his command in the city; located, infantry at Blue Island and Grand Crossing, cavalry and artillery at stock-yards; cannot learn that anything definite has been accomplished, but there has been no active
Wesley Merritt (search for this): chapter 28
my, Washington, July 7, 1894. brigadier-General Otis, Commanding Department of the Columbia, Vancouver Barracks, Washington: The order of the President sent you this morning by telegraph is the same in substance as one sent last night to General Merritt, the purpose being to extend military protection over the entire line of the Northern Pacific Railroad from St. Paul to Puget Sound. In the movement of the troop-trains along the line of the road in the execution of this order, the Department of Justice will furnish a sufficient force of marshals to make arrests and hold prisoners subject to the orders of the United States courts. You will please concert with General Merritt by direct correspondence the necessary exchanges of guards upon moving trains at the military posts in your department and in his, nearest to each other, so that the troops may return to their proper stations without unnecessary delay. J. M. Schofield, Major-General Commanding. by the President o
P. M. Arrangements (search for this): chapter 28
gh a part of the city, it may be advisable to bring them by steamboat. Please consider this matter, and have the arrangements perfected without delay. You may expect orders at any time for the movement. Acknowledge receipt, and report in what manner the movement is to be made. J. M. Schofield, Major-General Commanding. (Telegram.) Chicago, Illinois, July 2, 1894. Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.: Confidential despatch this date received at three-thirty P. M. Arrangements can be made to bring troops from Sheridan to Lake Front Park by steamer, but there would be difficulty in disembarking them there, as the Van Buren street viaduct has been torn down; and, besides, transportation from barracks to pier at Sheridan would necessarily be slow. They can be brought from Sheridan to Lake Front direct by rail, and disembark on grounds, thus avoiding marching through city. Suggest the latter plan as best, especially as rail transportation is now at the post su
J. M. Schofield (search for this): chapter 28
so effective as to promptly suppress all resistance to lawful authority, and to stop the destruction of life the moment lawless resistance has ceased. Punishment belongs not to the troops, but to the courts of justice. By command of Major-General Schofield: Geo. D. Ruggles, Adjutant-General. (General orders, no. 15.) Headquarters of the army, adjutant-General's office, Washington, May 25, 1894. The following instructions are issued for the government of department commanderse directly responsible to their military superiors. Any unlawful or unauthorized act on their part would not be excusable on the ground of any order or request received by them from a marshal or any other civil officer. By command of Major-General Schofield: Geo. D. Ruggles, Adjutant-General. It appears to have been thought in Chicago that the request of the United States marshal, with whom the commanding officer of the troops had been directed to confer, was equivalent to orders of
t of the guilty, this warning is especially intended to protect and save the innocent. In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be hereto affixed. Done at the city of Washington, this eighth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninetyfour, and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and nineteenth. Grover Cleveland. By the President: W. Q. Gresham, Secretary of State. (General oof the military forces of the United States—not is about to employ, but has employed, under specific orders, which were telegraphed to Colonel Martin on July 3, to do certain things which were precisely the things specified in the proclamation of July 8, and not to aid the United States marshals in doing those things or any others. Yet it was not until July 9, six days after the order to Colonel Martin, that those duties became clearly defined, and then they were misunderstood in the very essen
rules which must govern United States troops in all like emergencies, the subjoined order, dated July 9, was issued. The extracts from correspondence quoted below indicate the nature of the errors abse and retire peaceably to their respective abodes on or before twelve o'clock noon on the ninth day of July instant. Those who disregard this warning and persist in taking part with a riotous mob orders from Washington indicated that the Fort Sheridan garrison should be at that place. On July 9, the day after the President had issued his proclamation, it appeared in Chicago that the dutiesnot to aid the United States marshals in doing those things or any others. Yet it was not until July 9, six days after the order to Colonel Martin, that those duties became clearly defined, and then the seal of the United States to be hereto affixed. Done at the city of Washington, this ninth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-four, and of the independen
e between the States and Territories, and of securing to the United States the right guaranteed by law to the use of such roads for postal, military, naval, and other government service, the President has employed a part of the military forces of the United States: Now, therefore, I, Grover Cleveland, President of the United States, do hereby command all persons engaged in, or in any way connected with, such unlawful obstructions, combinations, and assemblages, to disperse and retire peaceably to their respective abodes on or before three o'clock in the afternoon on the tenth day of July instant. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal of the United States to be hereto affixed. Done at the city of Washington, this ninth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-four, and of the independence of the United States the one hundred and nineteenth. Grover Cleveland. By the President: W. Q. Gresham, Secretary of State.
July 2nd, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 28
ble sources, that by reason of unlawful obstructions, and combinations or assemblages of persons, it has become impracticable, in the judgment of the President, to enforce, by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings, the laws of the United States, and to prevent obstructions of the United States mails, and interruptions to commerce between the States, on the line of the Northern Pacific Railroad, and to secure to the United States the right guaranteed by section 11 of the act approved July 2, 1864, constituting the Northern Pacific Railroad a post route and military road subject to the use of the United States for postal, military, naval, and all other government service, you are directed by the President to employ the military force under your command to remove obstructions to the mails, and to execute any orders of the United States courts for the protection of property in the hands of receivers appointed by such courts, and for preventing interruption of interstate commerce, an
July 4th, 1894 AD (search for this): chapter 28
unsel. Acknowledge receipt, and report action promptly. By order of the President: J. M. Schofield, Major-General. (Telegram.) Chicago, Ills., July 4, 1894. Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.: At ten-fifteen this morning Colonel Crofton reports his command in the city; located, infantry at Blue Isl arrival of troops. General Miles is expected to arrive in city within an hour or at twelve. Martin, Asst. Adjt.-Genl. (Telegram.) Chicago, Ills., July 4, 1894. Adjt. Genl. U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.: Returned at eleven-thirty this morning. Miles, Maj.-Genl. Commanding. (Telegram.) Chicago, Ills., July 4, 1894. Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.: Cavalry and artillery moving to the stock-yards were delayed by obstructions placed upon the track, also cars being overturned on track and the threatening mob in the vicinity. A report is received that a mob of about two thousand men has gathered near Blue Island
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