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Michigan Valley (Kansas, United States) (search for this): entry army
as appointed (February, 1812) first major-general, or acting commander-in-chief of the armies in the field, having the Northern Department under his immediate control. Thomas Pinckney, of South Carolina, also a soldier of the Revolution, was appointed (March, 1812) second major-general, and placed in command of the Southern Department. Joseph Bloomfield (governor of New Jersey), James Winchester (of Tennessee), John P. Boyd (of Massachusetts), and William Hull (then governor of the Territory of Michigan) were commissioned (April 8, 1812) brigadier-generals. The same commission was given (June) to Thomas Flournoy, of Georgia. John Armstrong, of New York, was also commissioned (July 4) a brigadier-general to fill a vacancy caused by the recent death of Gen. Peter Gansevoort. This was soon followed (July 8) by a like commission for John Chandler, of Maine. Morgan Lewis, of New York, was appointed quartermaster-general (April 3), and Alexander Smyth, of Virginia, was made inspector-
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): entry army
wed $200 bounty for each recruit, and the States made large additional offers; but the real amount was small, for at that time the Continental paper money had greatly depreciated. It was found necessary to replenish the regiments by drafts from the militia. The whole force of the American army, exclusive of a few troops in the Southern department, consisted, late in the spring of 1779, of only about 8,600 effective men. At that time the British had 11,000 at New York and 4,000 or 5,000 at Newport, besides a considerable force in the South. In 1780 a committee of Congress, of which General Schuyler was chairman, were long in camp, maturing, with Washington, a plan for another reorganization of the army. Congress agreed to the plan. The remains of sixteen additional battalions were to be disbanded, and the men distributed to the State lines. The army was to consist of fifty regiments of foot, including Hazen's, four regiments of artillery, and one of artificers, with two partisan
Samar (Philippines) (search for this): entry army
he Department of Northern Luzon, as above described, including the Island of Polillo, and north of a line passing southeastwardly through the West Pass of Apo to the twelfth parallel of north latitude; thence easterly along said parallel to 124° 10′ east of Greenwich, but including the entire Island of Masbate: thence northerly through San Bernardino Straits; headquarters, Manila, P. I. Commander, Maj.-Gen. John C. Bates. Depairtment of the Visayas.--Includes all islands (except Island of Samar) south of the southern line of the Department of Southern Luzon and east of long. 121° 45′ east of Greenwich and north of the ninth parallel of latitude, excepting the Island of Mindanao and all islands east of the Straits of Surigao; headquarters, Iloilo, P. I. Commander, Brig.-Gen. Robert P. Hughes. Department of Mindanao and Jolo.--Includes all the remaining islands of the Philippine Archipelago; headquarters, Zamboanga, P. I. Commander, Brig.-Gen. William A. Kobbe. Department of A<
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): entry army
of New Jersey), James Winchester (of Tennessee), John P. Boyd (of Massachusetts), and William Hull (then governor of the Territory of Michigan) were commissioned (April 8, 1812) brigadier-generals. The same commission was given (June) to Thomas Flournoy, of Georgia. John Armstrong, of New York, was also commissioned (July 4) a brigadier-general to fill a vacancy caused by the recent death of Gen. Peter Gansevoort. This was soon followed (July 8) by a like commission for John Chandler, of Maine. Morgan Lewis, of New York, was appointed quartermaster-general (April 3), and Alexander Smyth, of Virginia, was made inspector-general (March 30)--each bearing the commission of a brigadier-general. Thomas Cushing, of Massachusetts, was appointed adjutant-general with the rank of brigadier-general. James Wilkinson, of Maryland, the senior brigadier-general in the army, was sent to New Orleans to relieve Wade Hampton (then a brigadier-general), who was a meritorious subaltern officer in S
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): entry army
Cuba; headquarters, Havana, Cuba. Commander, Brig.-Gen. Leonard Wood. Department of Dakota.--States of Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, and so much of Wyoming and Idaho as is embraced in the Yellowstone National Park; headquarters, St. Paul, Minn. Commander, Brig.-Gen. James F. Wade. Department of the East.--New England States, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia, West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana, and District of Porto Rico, embracing Porto Rico and adjacent islands; headquarters, Governor's Island, N. Y. Commander, Maj.-Gen. John R. Brooke. Department of the Lakes.--States of Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee; headquarters, Chicago, Ill. Commander, Maj.-Gen. Elwell S. Otis. Department of the Missouri.--States of Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas, and Arkansas, the Indian Territory, and the Territory of Ok
United States (United States) (search for this): entry army
e of insurrection, or when the laws of the United States should be opposed by a combination too powates were mustered into the service of the United States they were no longer under the control of tving been mustered into the service of the United States, could he dismissed by the State authoritiU. S. A. Col. Adna R. Chaffee, 8th Cavalry, U. S. A. (Major-General, U. S. V.). Brig.-Gen. ArthurGenerals. Col. John C. Bates, 2d Infantry, U. S. A. (Major-General U. S. V.). Col. Lloyd Wheaton, 7th Infantry, U. S. A. (Major-General, U. S. V.). Col. George W. Davis, 23d Infantry (Brigadier-G. V.). Col. Samuel S. Sumner. 6th Cavalry, U. S. A. Capt. Leonard Wood, Assistant Surgeon, U. S.V.). Col. George M. Randall, 8th Infantry, U. S. A. (Brigadier-General, U. S. V.). Maj. William A. Kobbe, 3d Artillery, U. S. A. (Brigadier-General, U. S. V.). Brig.-Gen. Frederick D. Grant, U. S. V. Capt. J. Franklin Bell, 7th Cavalry, U. S. A. (Brigadier-General, U. S. V.). Continental ar[5 more...]
Saint Michael (Alaska, United States) (search for this): entry army
ern Luzon and east of long. 121° 45′ east of Greenwich and north of the ninth parallel of latitude, excepting the Island of Mindanao and all islands east of the Straits of Surigao; headquarters, Iloilo, P. I. Commander, Brig.-Gen. Robert P. Hughes. Department of Mindanao and Jolo.--Includes all the remaining islands of the Philippine Archipelago; headquarters, Zamboanga, P. I. Commander, Brig.-Gen. William A. Kobbe. Department of Alaska.--Territory of Alaska; headquarters, Fort St. Michael, Alaska. Commander, Brig.-Gen. George M. Randall. Department of California.--States of California and Nevada, the Hawaiian Islands and their dependencies; headquarters, San Francisco, Cal. Commander, Maj.-Gen. William R. Shafter. Department of the Colorado.--States of Wyoming (except so much thereof as is embraced in the Yellowstone National Park), Colorado, and Utah, and the Territories of Arizona and New Mexico: headquarters, Denver, Col. Commander, Brig.-Gen. Henry C. Merriam. De
Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): entry army
arters, St. Paul, Minn. Commander, Brig.-Gen. James F. Wade. Department of the East.--New England States, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia, West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana, and District of Porto Rico, embracing Porto Rico and adjacent islands; headquarters, Governor's Island, N. Y. Commander, Maj.-Gen. John R. Brooke. Department of the Lakes.--States of Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee; headquarters, Chicago, Ill. Commander, Maj.-Gen. Elwell S. Otis. Department of the Missouri.--States of Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas, and Arkansas, the Indian Territory, and the Territory of Oklahoma; headquarters, Omaha, Neb. Commander, Brig.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee. Department of Texas.--State of Texas; headquarters, San Antonio. Tex. Commander, Col. Chambers McKibbin, 12th Infantry. An act of Congress of June 6, 1900, re-organize
Warwick (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry army
there were 120,000 men at Fort Monroe, exclusive of the forces of General Wool, the commander there. A large portion of these moved up the Peninsula in two columns, one, under Gen. S. P. Heintzelman, marching near the York River; the other, under General Keyes, near the James River. A comparatively small Confederate force, under Gen. J. B. Magruder, formed a fortified line across the Peninsula in the pathway of the Nationals. The left of this line was at Yorktown, and the right on the Warwick River, that falls into the James. In front of this line McClellan's continually augmenting army remained a month, engaged in the tedious operations of a regular siege, under the direction of Gen. Fitz-John Porter, skirmishing frequently, and, on one occasion, making a reconnaissance in force that was disastrous to the Nationals. On May 3, Magruder, who had resorted to all sorts of tricks to deceive and mislead the Nationals, wrote to Cooper. of the Confederate War Department: Thus, with 5,0
Montreal (Canada) (search for this): entry army
between these two commanders that the public service was greatly injured thereby. The Secretary of War (Armstrong) was preparing to invade Canada by way of the St. Lawrence, and, fearing the effects of this enmity, transferred the headquarters of the War Department to Sackett's Harbor, at the east end of Lake Ontario, that he might promote harmony between these testy old generals. In arranging for the expedition down the St. Lawrence, Armstrong directed Hampton to penetrate Canada towards Montreal by way of the Sorel River. Instead of obeying the order, Hampton marched his troops to the Chateaugay River, and at Chateaugay Four Corners he tarried twenty-six days awaiting orders. Finally he was ordered to descend the Chateaugay and meet Wilkinson at its mouth. He moved forward late in October, when he was confronted by Lieutenant-Colonel De Salaberry, near the junction of Outard Creek and the Chateaugay, where Hampton encamped and was overtaken by his artillery. De Salaberry was e
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