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Stony Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry army
lellan's line of march. On the night of May 4, Butler's army was embarked on transports and conveyed around to Hampton Roads; and at dawn the next morning 35,000 troops, accompanied by a squadron of war vessels under Admiral Lee, were rapidly ascending the James towards City Point, at the mouth of the Appomattox. At the same time, Gen. A. V. Kautz, with 3,000 cavalry, moving swiftly from Suffolk, south of the James, struck the Weldon Railway south of Petersburg, and burned a bridge over Stony Creek, while Col. R. M. West, with 1,800 cavalry (mostly colored men), moved from Williamsburg up the north bank of the James, keeping abreast of the grand flotilla. The bewildered Confederates made no serious opposition to these movements. A division of National troops took quiet possession of City Point (May 5) and the war vessels took a position above the mouth of the Appomattox. At the same time a heavy force landed on a triangular piece of land between the James and Appomattox, called B
Point Isabel (California, United States) (search for this): entry army
forces he remained at Corpus Christi until the next spring, when the camp at that place was broken up (March 8, 1846), and the Army of Occupation proceeded to Point Isabel, nearer the Rio Grande. When approaching Point Isabel, Taylor was met by a deputation of citizens, and presented with a protest, signed by the Prefect of the Point Isabel, Taylor was met by a deputation of citizens, and presented with a protest, signed by the Prefect of the Northern District of the Department of Tamaulipas, against the presence of his army. But he pressed forward to Point Isabel, whence, with a larger portion of his army, he proceeded to the Rio Grande opposite Matamoras, arriving there on March 29. There he began the erection of defensive works; and so the Army of Occupation in TePoint Isabel, whence, with a larger portion of his army, he proceeded to the Rio Grande opposite Matamoras, arriving there on March 29. There he began the erection of defensive works; and so the Army of Occupation in Texas assumed a hostile attitude towards the Mexicans. See Mexico, War with. Army in the Civil War. When Mr. Lincoln entered upon the duties of President (March 4, 1861) the total regular force of the army was 16,000 men, and these were principally in the Western States and Territories, guarding the frontier settlers against
Wade Hampton (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry army
This was soon followed (July 8) by a like commission for John Chandler, of Maine. Morgan Lewis, of New York, was appointed quartermaster-general (April 3), and Alexander Smyth, of Virginia, was made inspector-general (March 30)--each bearing the commission of a brigadier-general. Thomas Cushing, of Massachusetts, was appointed adjutant-general with the rank of brigadier-general. James Wilkinson, of Maryland, the senior brigadier-general in the army, was sent to New Orleans to relieve Wade Hampton (then a brigadier-general), who was a meritorious subaltern officer in South Carolina during the Revolution. Alexander Macomb of the engineers--one of the first graduates of the United States Military Academy--was promoted to colonel, and Winfield Scott, Edward Pendleton Gaines, and Eleazer W. Ripley were commissioned colonels. In the summer of 1812, Gen. Joseph Bloomfield was sent to Lake Champlain with several regiments, and on September 1 he had gathered at Plattsburg about 8,000 m
Luzon (Philippines) (search for this): entry army
12 companies of 104 men), with bands, etc.; total, 38,520. Engineers, 3 battalions (4 companies of 104 men), with bands, etc.; total, 1,282. Staff department, signal corps, etc., 2,783. Total number of enlisted men, 77,287. Under the act of March 4, 1899, military divisions and departments were reorganized as follows: Headquarters of the army.--Commander, Lieut.-Gen. Nelson A. Miles, Washington, D. C. division of the Philippines.--Consisting of the Departments of Northern Luzon, Southern Luzon, Visayas, Mindanao, and Jolo, comprising all the islands ceded to the United States by Spain; headquarters, Manila, P. I. Commander, Maj.-Gen. Arthur MacArthur. Department of Northern Luzon.--Includes all that part of the Island of Luzon north of Laguna de Bay and the province of Laguna, the same being the provinces of Abra, Bontoc, Benguet, Bataan, Bulacan, Cagayan, Ilocos, Infanta, Morong, Norte, Ilocos Sur, La Isabela de Luzon, Lepanto, La Union, Nueva Vizcaya, Nueva Ec
Jefferson City (Missouri, United States) (search for this): entry army
under Knox until the British evacuated New York (Nov. 25, 1783). After that event they all received their discharge. The following shows the number of troops furnished by each State for the Continental army: New HAMPSHIRE12,947 MASSACHUSETTS67,907 Rhode ISLAND5,908 CONNECTICUT31,939 New YORK17,781 New JERSEY10,726 PENNSYLVANIA25,678 DELAWARE2,386 MARYLAND13,912 VIRGINIA26,678 North CAROLINA7,263 South CAROLINA6,417 GEORGIA2,679   TOTAL231,771 The army in 1808-15. Jefferson's policy had always been to keep the army and navy as small and inexpensive as possible. The army was reduced to a mere frontier guard against the Indians. In 1808 the aspect of international affairs was such as to demand an increase of the military strength of the republic, and the President asked Congress to augment the number and efficiency of the regular army. They did so, though the measure was strongly opposed by the Federalists. There was a rising war-spirit in the land. A bill
Fort Vancouver (Washington, United States) (search for this): entry army
uarters, San Francisco, Cal. Commander, Maj.-Gen. William R. Shafter. Department of the Colorado.--States of Wyoming (except so much thereof as is embraced in the Yellowstone National Park), Colorado, and Utah, and the Territories of Arizona and New Mexico: headquarters, Denver, Col. Commander, Brig.-Gen. Henry C. Merriam. Department of the Columbia.--States of Washington, Oregon, Idaho (except so much of the latter as is embraced in the Yellowstone National Park) ; headquarters, Vancouver Barracks, Wash. Commander,------. Department of Cuba.--Consisting of the provinces of the Island of Cuba; headquarters, Havana, Cuba. Commander, Brig.-Gen. Leonard Wood. Department of Dakota.--States of Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, and so much of Wyoming and Idaho as is embraced in the Yellowstone National Park; headquarters, St. Paul, Minn. Commander, Brig.-Gen. James F. Wade. Department of the East.--New England States, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delawa
Oklahoma (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): entry army
--States of Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee; headquarters, Chicago, Ill. Commander, Maj.-Gen. Elwell S. Otis. Department of the Missouri.--States of Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas, and Arkansas, the Indian Territory, and the Territory of Oklahoma; headquarters, Omaha, Neb. Commander, Brig.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee. Department of Texas.--State of Texas; headquarters, San Antonio. Tex. Commander, Col. Chambers McKibbin, 12th Infantry. An act of Congress oTerritory of Oklahoma; headquarters, Omaha, Neb. Commander, Brig.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee. Department of Texas.--State of Texas; headquarters, San Antonio. Tex. Commander, Col. Chambers McKibbin, 12th Infantry. An act of Congress of June 6, 1900, re-organized the regular army and re-established the grade of lieutenant-general by the following provision: That the senior major-general of the line commanding the army shall have the rank, pay, and allowances of a lieutenant-general. In his annual message to Congress, Dec. 3, 1900, President McKinley urged a provision for increasing the army in order to maintain its strength after June 30, 1901, when it would be reduced according to the act of March 4, 1899. He detailed the
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry army
to make an energetic commander of a large army. The Provincial Congress of Massachusetts apprehended the melting-away of the army gathered at Cambridge unless a morIt was to consist of twenty-six regiments, besides riflemen and artillery. Massachusetts was to furnish sixteen; Connecticut, five; New Hampshire, three; and Rhode hey had been enlisted. The State quotas were reduced to eighty battalions: Massachusetts to furnish fifteen; Virginia and Pennsylvania, eleven each; Connecticut ands furnished by each State for the Continental army: New HAMPSHIRE12,947 MASSACHUSETTS67,907 Rhode ISLAND5,908 CONNECTICUT31,939 New YORK17,781 New JERSEY10,7(governor of New Jersey), James Winchester (of Tennessee), John P. Boyd (of Massachusetts), and William Hull (then governor of the Territory of Michigan) were commis0)--each bearing the commission of a brigadier-general. Thomas Cushing, of Massachusetts, was appointed adjutant-general with the rank of brigadier-general. James
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): entry army
dquarters, Havana, Cuba. Commander, Brig.-Gen. Leonard Wood. Department of Dakota.--States of Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, and so much of Wyoming and Idaho as is embraced in the Yellowstone National Park; headquarters, St. Paul, Minn. Commander, Brig.-Gen. James F. Wade. Department of the East.--New England States, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia, West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana, and District of Porto Rico, embracing Porto Rico and adjacent islands; headquarters, Governor's Island, N. Y. Commander, Maj.-Gen. John R. Brooke. Department of the Lakes.--States of Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee; headquarters, Chicago, Ill. Commander, Maj.-Gen. Elwell S. Otis. Department of the Missouri.--States of Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas, and Arkansas, the Indian Territory, and the Territory of Oklahoma; h
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry army
ce more remote 75,000. Very soon there were 120,000 men at Fort Monroe, exclusive of the forces of General Wool, the commander there. A large portion of these moved up the Peninsula in two columns, one, under Gen. S. P. Heintzelman, marching near the York River; the other, under General Keyes, near the James River. A comparatively small Confederate force, under Gen. J. B. Magruder, formed a fortified line across the Peninsula in the pathway of the Nationals. The left of this line was at Yorktown, and the right on the Warwick River, that falls into the James. In front of this line McClellan's continually augmenting army remained a month, engaged in the tedious operations of a regular siege, under the direction of Gen. Fitz-John Porter, skirmishing frequently, and, on one occasion, making a reconnaissance in force that was disastrous to the Nationals. On May 3, Magruder, who had resorted to all sorts of tricks to deceive and mislead the Nationals, wrote to Cooper. of the Confedera
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