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Port Royal (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry colonial-settlements
a charter for all the lands of New France. She sent out missionaries in 1613. They sailed from Honfleur March 12, and arrived in Acadia (q. v.), where the arms of Madame Guercheville were set up in token of possession. Her agent proceeded to Port Royal (now Annapolis), where he found only five persons, two of whom were Jesuit missionaries previously sent over. The Jesuits went with other persons to Mount Desert Island. Just as they had begun to provide themselves with comforts, they were atval he broke in pieces, at St. Saviour, a cross which the Jesuits had set up, and raised another, on which he inscribed the name of King James. He sailed to St. Croix and destroyed the remains of De Mont's settlement there; and then he went to Port Royal and laid that deserted town in ashes. The English government did not approve the act, nor did the French government resent it. Though the revolution in England (1688) found its warmest friends among the Low Churchmen and Non-conformists the
ell defined on maps published by Evans and Mitchell—that of the latter (a new edition) in 1754. The British North American colonies stretched coastwise along the Atlantic about 1,000 miles, but inland their extent was very limited. New France, as the French settlers called their claimed territory in America, extended over a vastly wider space, from Cape Breton, in a sort of crescent, to the mouth of the Mississippi River, but the population was mainly collected on the St. Lawrence, between Quebec and Montreal. The English colonies in America at that time had a population of 1,485,634, of whom 292,738 were negroes. The French were scarcely 100,000 in number, but were strong in Indian allies, who, stretching along the whole interior frontier of the English colonies, and disgusted with constant encroachments upon their territories, as well as ill-treatment by the English, were always ripe and ready for cruel warfare. The war with the French and Indians, and the contests with royal
Manhattan (New York, United States) (search for this): entry colonial-settlements
er—both in compliment to their King. After various vicissitudes, the settlement flourished, and, in 1619, the first representative Assembly in Virginia was held at Jamestown. Then were laid the foundations of the State of Virginia (q. v.). Manhattan Island (now the borough of Manhattan, city of New York) was discovered by Henry Hudson in 1609, while employed by the Dutch East India Company. Dutch traders were soon afterwards seated there and on the site of Albany, 150 miles up the Hudson Rived exclusive privilege to Amsterdam merchants to traffic with the Indians on the Hudson, and the country was called New Netherland. The Dutch West India Company was formed in 1621, with unrestricted control over New Netherland. They bought Manhattan Island of the Indians for about $24, paid chiefly in cheap trinkets, and in 1623 thirty families from Holland landed there and began a settlement. Then were laid the foundations of the State of New York, as New Netherland was called after it passe
his measure; and, to thwart the negotiations of Stuart with the Indians, sent Thomas Walker as her commissioner to the congress of the Six Nations held at Fort Stanwix (q. v.) late in the autumn of 1768. There about 3.000 Indians were present, who were loaded with generous gifts. They complied with the wishes of the several agents present, and the western boundary-line was established at the mouth of the Kanawha to meet Stuart's line on the south. From the Kanawha northward it followed the Ohio and Alleghany rivers, a branch of the Susquehanna, and so on to the junction of Canada and Wood creeks, tributaries of the Mohawk River. Thus the Indian frontier was defined all the way from Florida almost to Lake Ontario; but Sir William Johnson (q. v.), pretending to recognize a right of the Six Nations to a larger part of Kentucky, caused the line to be continued down the Ohio to the mouth of the Tennessee River, which stream was made to constitute the western boundary of Virginia. In
Jamestown, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): entry colonial-settlements
oke Island. Storms drove them into the entrance to Chesapeake Bay, when they ascended the Powhatan River 50 miles, landed, and built a hamlet, which they called Jamestown. The stream they named James River—both in compliment to their King. After various vicissitudes, the settlement flourished, and, in 1619, the first representative Assembly in Virginia was held at Jamestown. Then were laid the foundations of the State of Virginia (q. v.). Manhattan Island (now the borough of Manhattan, city of New York) was discovered by Henry Hudson in 1609, while employed by the Dutch East India Company. Dutch traders were soon afterwards seated there and on the site s to settle in the region of the Carolinas had been made before the English landed on the shores of the James River. Some settlers went into North Carolina from Jamestown, between the years 1640 and 1650, and in 1663 a settlement in the northern part of North Carolina had an organized government, and the country was named Carolina
Portsmouth (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry colonial-settlements
rously proposed to furnish them with supplies, a ship, a pinnace, and small boats, with sufficient seamen to stay and make a further discovery of the country; or sufficient provisions to carry them to England, or to give them a passage home in his fleet. The first proposal was accepted; but a storm having shattered his vessels, the discouraged colonists concluded to take passage for home with Drake, which they did. The whole colony sailed from Virginia June 18, 1586, and arrived at Portsmouth, England, July 28. Madame de Guercheville, a pious lady in France, zealous for the conversion of the American Indians, persuaded De Monts to surrender his patent, and then obtained a charter for all the lands of New France. She sent out missionaries in 1613. They sailed from Honfleur March 12, and arrived in Acadia (q. v.), where the arms of Madame Guercheville were set up in token of possession. Her agent proceeded to Port Royal (now Annapolis), where he found only five persons, two of who
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry colonial-settlements
and Gorges dissolved their partnership in 1629, when the former obtained a grant for the whole tract, and laid the foundations for the commonwealth of New Hampshire (q. v.). King James of England persecuted the Roman Catholics in his dominions, and George Calvert, who was a zealous royalist, sought a refuge for his brethren in America. King James favored his project, but died before anything of much consequence was accomplished. His son Charles I. granted a domain between North and South Virginia to Calvert (then created Lord Baltimore). Before the charter was completed Lord Baltimore died. but his son Cecil received it in 1632. Tile domain was called Maryland, and Cecil sent his brother Leonard, with colonists, to settle it (see Baltimore; Baltimore, Lords; Calvert, Leonard). They arrived in the spring of 1634, and, at a place called St. Mary, they laid the foundations of the commonwealth of Maryland (Maryland). The Dutch navigator, Adriaen Block (q. v.), sailing east from Man
Elizabethtown (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): entry colonial-settlements
e of demarcation between the first settlements in Delaware, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, owing to their early political situation. The (present) State of Delaware remained in possession of the Dutch, and afterwards of the English, until it was purchased by William Penn, in 1682, and annexed to State of Pennsylvania (q. v.) So it remained until the Revolution as the Territories, when it became the State of Delaware (q. v.) The first permanent settlement in New Jersey (q. v.) was made at Elizabethtown in 1644. A province lying between New Jersey and Maryland was granted to William Penn, in 1681, for an asylum for his persecuted brethren, the Quakers, and settlements were immediately begun there, in addition to some already made by the Swedes within the domain. Unsuccessful attempts to settle in the region of the Carolinas had been made before the English landed on the shores of the James River. Some settlers went into North Carolina from Jamestown, between the years 1640 and 1650,
settle in the region of the Carolinas had been made before the English landed on the shores of the James River. Some settlers went into North Carolina from Jamestown, between the years 1640 and 1650, and in 1663 a settlement in the northern part of North Carolina had an organized government, and the country was named Carolina, in honor of Charles II., of England. In 1668 the foundations of the commonwealth of State of North Carolina (q. v.) were laid at Edenton. In 1670 some people from Barbadoes sailed into the harbor of Charleston and settled on the Ashley and Cooper rivers (see State of South Carolina). The benevolent General Oglethorpe, commiserating the condition of the prisoners for debt, in England, conceived the idea of founding a colony in America with them. The government approved the project, and, in 1732, he landed, with emigrants, on the site of the city of Savannah, and there planted the germ of the commonwealth of Georgia (q. v.) The first English colony planted
Manhattan, Riley County, Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): entry colonial-settlements
g. After various vicissitudes, the settlement flourished, and, in 1619, the first representative Assembly in Virginia was held at Jamestown. Then were laid the foundations of the State of Virginia (q. v.). Manhattan Island (now the borough of Manhattan, city of New York) was discovered by Henry Hudson in 1609, while employed by the Dutch East India Company. Dutch traders were soon afterwards seated there and on the site of Albany, 150 miles up the Hudson River. The government of Holland graimore; Baltimore, Lords; Calvert, Leonard). They arrived in the spring of 1634, and, at a place called St. Mary, they laid the foundations of the commonwealth of Maryland (Maryland). The Dutch navigator, Adriaen Block (q. v.), sailing east from Manhattan, explored a river some distance inland, which the Indians called Quon-eh-ti-cut, and in the valley watered by that river a number of Puritans from Plymouth began a settlement in 1633. The first permanent settlement made in the valley of the
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