hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 16,340 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 6,437 1 Browse Search
France (France) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 2,310 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Europe 1,632 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 1,474 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 1,404 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). Search the whole document.

Found 150 total hits in 53 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
Detroit (Michigan, United States) (search for this): entry dunmore-john-murray-earl-of
olonists. He visited General Gage at Boston early in the autumn of 1775, and immediately after his return to Williamsburg he left Dunmore and departed for the Ohio country, with two companions. They were stopped near Hagerstown as suspicious persons, sent back to Frederick, and there an examination of Connelly's papers revealed the whole nefarious plot. He bore Dunmore's commission of colonel, and was directed to raise a regiment in the western country and Canada, the rendezvous to be at Detroit, where hostilities against the white people might be more easily fomented among the Indians. Thence he was to march in the spring, enter Virginia with a motley force, and meet Dunmore at Alexandria, on the Potomac, who would be there with a military and naval force. The arrest of Connelly frustrated the design. He was put in jail and his papers were sent to the Continental Congress. He was kept a prisoner until about the end of the war. What is known historically as Dunmore's War was
Ramsgate (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry dunmore-john-murray-earl-of
which escaped was presently burned by the Virginians to prevent it from becoming a shelter to the enemy. Thus perished, a prey to civil war, the largest and richest of the rising towns of Virginia. After committing other depredations on the Virginia coast, he landed on Gwyn's Island, in Chesapeake Bay, with 500 men, black and white, cast up some intrenchments, and built a stockade fort. Virginia militia, under Gen. Andrew Lewis, attacked and drove him from the island. In this engagement Dunmore was wounded. Burning several of his vessels that were aground, Dunmore sailed away with the remainder, with a large amount of booty, among which were about 1,000 slaves. After more plundering on the coast the vessels were dispersed, some to the West Indies, some to the Bermudas and St. Augustine, and Dunmore himself proneeded to join the naval force at New York, and soon afterwards went to England. In 1786 Dunmore was made governor of Bermuda. He died in Ramsgate, England, in May, 1809.
Point Pleasant (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): entry dunmore-john-murray-earl-of
sylvanians and the agents of the Six Nations were making efforts for peace, Governor Dunmore, bent on war, called for volunteers, and 400 of these were gathered on the banks of the Ohio, a little below Wheeling. This force marched against and destroyed (Aug. 7, 1774) a Shawnee town on the Muskingum. They were followed by Dunmore, with 1,500 Virginians, who pressed forward against an Indian village on the Scioto, while Col. Andrew Lewis, with 1,200 men, encountered a force of Indians at Point Pleasant, at the mouth of the Great Kanawha River (Oct. 10), where a bloody battle ensued. The Indians were led by Logan, Cornstalk, and other braves. The Virginians were victorious, but lost seventy men killed and wounded. Dunmore was charged with inciting the Indian war and arranging the campaign so as to carry out his political plans. It was charged that he arranged the expedition so as to have the force under Lewis annihilated by the Indians, and thereby weaken the physical strength and b
Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): entry dunmore-john-murray-earl-of
he Massachusetts legislature for the same purpose. In 1775, finding the people of his colony committed to the cause of freedom, he engaged in a conspiracy to bring the Indians in hostile array against the Virginia frontier. He employed Dr. John Connelly, whom he had commissioned in 1774 to lead a movement for sustaining the claims of Virginia to the whole district of Pennsylvania west of Lord Dunmore's signature. the Alleghany Mountains. He was a native of Pennsylvania, and lived at Pittsburg; and it is believed that he suggested to Dunmore the plan of combining the Western Indians against the colonists. He visited General Gage at Boston early in the autumn of 1775, and immediately after his return to Williamsburg he left Dunmore and departed for the Ohio country, with two companions. They were stopped near Hagerstown as suspicious persons, sent back to Frederick, and there an examination of Connelly's papers revealed the whole nefarious plot. He bore Dunmore's commission of
Fort Gower (Ohio, United States) (search for this): entry dunmore-john-murray-earl-of
rwards to incite a servile insurrection in Virginia for the same purpose show that he was capable of exercising almost any means to accomplish his ends. The Indians in the Ohio country, alarmed at the approach of Dunmore, had hastened to make peace. Logan refused to attend the conference for the purpose, but sent a speech which became famous in history. Dunmore's officers in that expedition, having heard of the movements in New England, and of the Continental Congress, held a meeting at Fort Gower (mouth of the Hockhocking River), and after complimenting the governor and declaring their allegiance to the King, resolved to maintain the rights of the colonists by every means in their power. The bold movement in the Virginia convention (March, 1775) excited the official wrath of Governor Dunmore, who stormed in proclamations; and to frighten the Virginians (or, probably, with a more mischievous intent), he caused a rumor to be circulated that he intended to excite an insurrection a
Dunmore, John Murray, Earl of, 1732-1809 royal governor; born in Scotland in 1732; was descended in the feminine line from the house of Stuart. He was made governor of New York in January, 1770, and of Virginia, July, 1771, arriving there early in 1772. When the Virginia Assembly recommended a committee of correspondence (March, 1773), he Seal of Lord Dunmore. immediately dissolved it, and in May, 1774, he again dissolved the Assembly because it had passed a resolution making the Ist of June a day of fasting and prayer. This was the same day which had been appointed by the Massachusetts legislature for the same purpose. In 1775, finding the people of his colony committed to the cause of freedom, he engaged in a conspiracy to bring the Indians in hostile array against the Virginia frontier. He employed Dr. John Connelly, whom he had commissioned in 1774 to lead a movement for sustaining the claims of Virginia to the whole district of Pennsylvania west of Lord Dunmore'
of his colony committed to the cause of freedom, he engaged in a conspiracy to bring the Indians in hostile array against the Virginia frontier. He employed Dr. John Connelly, whom he had commissioned in 1774 to lead a movement for sustaining the claims of Virginia to the whole district of Pennsylvania west of Lord Dunmore's sigdeparted for the Ohio country, with two companions. They were stopped near Hagerstown as suspicious persons, sent back to Frederick, and there an examination of Connelly's papers revealed the whole nefarious plot. He bore Dunmore's commission of colonel, and was directed to raise a regiment in the western country and Canada, thehe spring, enter Virginia with a motley force, and meet Dunmore at Alexandria, on the Potomac, who would be there with a military and naval force. The arrest of Connelly frustrated the design. He was put in jail and his papers were sent to the Continental Congress. He was kept a prisoner until about the end of the war. What
forward against an Indian village on the Scioto, while Col. Andrew Lewis, with 1,200 men, encountered a force of Indians at Point Pleasant, at the mouth of the Great Kanawha River (Oct. 10), where a bloody battle ensued. The Indians were led by Logan, Cornstalk, and other braves. The Virginians were victorious, but lost seventy men killed and wounded. Dunmore was charged with inciting the Indian war and arranging the campaign so as to carry out his political plans. It was charged that he as to incite a servile insurrection in Virginia for the same purpose show that he was capable of exercising almost any means to accomplish his ends. The Indians in the Ohio country, alarmed at the approach of Dunmore, had hastened to make peace. Logan refused to attend the conference for the purpose, but sent a speech which became famous in history. Dunmore's officers in that expedition, having heard of the movements in New England, and of the Continental Congress, held a meeting at Fort Gowe
4) a Shawnee town on the Muskingum. They were followed by Dunmore, with 1,500 Virginians, who pressed forward against an Indian village on the Scioto, while Col. Andrew Lewis, with 1,200 men, encountered a force of Indians at Point Pleasant, at the mouth of the Great Kanawha River (Oct. 10), where a bloody battle ensued. The Indiing the Indian war and arranging the campaign so as to carry out his political plans. It was charged that he arranged the expedition so as to have the force under Lewis annihilated by the Indians, and thereby weaken the physical strength and break down the spirits of the Virginians, for they were defying royal power. His efforts he landed on Gwyn's Island, in Chesapeake Bay, with 500 men, black and white, cast up some intrenchments, and built a stockade fort. Virginia militia, under Gen. Andrew Lewis, attacked and drove him from the island. In this engagement Dunmore was wounded. Burning several of his vessels that were aground, Dunmore sailed away with
s, and 400 of these were gathered on the banks of the Ohio, a little below Wheeling. This force marched against and destroyed (Aug. 7, 1774) a Shawnee town on the Muskingum. They were followed by Dunmore, with 1,500 Virginians, who pressed forward against an Indian village on the Scioto, while Col. Andrew Lewis, with 1,200 men, encountered a force of Indians at Point Pleasant, at the mouth of the Great Kanawha River (Oct. 10), where a bloody battle ensued. The Indians were led by Logan, Cornstalk, and other braves. The Virginians were victorious, but lost seventy men killed and wounded. Dunmore was charged with inciting the Indian war and arranging the campaign so as to carry out his political plans. It was charged that he arranged the expedition so as to have the force under Lewis annihilated by the Indians, and thereby weaken the physical strength and break down the spirits of the Virginians, for they were defying royal power. His efforts afterwards to incite a servile insurr
1 2 3 4 5 6