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March 4th, 1853 AD (search for this): entry fillmore-millard
finally set at rest, it was hoped, by the passage of various acts which were parts of compromises proposed in the omnibus bill (q. v.) of Mr. Clay in the summer of 1850. It was during his administration that difficulties with Cuba occurred, diplomatic communications with Japan were opened, measures were adopted looking towards the construction of a railway from the Mississippi to the Pacific Ocean, and other measures of great public interest occurred. Mr. Fillmore retired from office March 4, 1853, leaving the country in a state of peace within and without, and every department of industry flourishing. In 1852 he was a candidate of the Whig convention for President of the United States, but did not get the nomination. During the spring and summer of 1854 he made an extensive tour through the Southern and Western States; and, in the spring of 1855, after an excursion in New England, he sailed for Europe, where he remained until June, 1856. While at Rome he received the news of h
bus bill (q. v.) of Mr. Clay in the summer of 1850. It was during his administration that difficulties with Cuba occurred, diplomatic communications with Japan were opened, measures were adopted looking towards the construction of a railway from the Mississippi to the Pacific Ocean, and other measures of great public interest occurred. Mr. Fillmore retired from office March 4, 1853, leaving the country in a state of peace within and without, and every department of industry flourishing. In 1852 he was a candidate of the Whig convention for President of the United States, but did not get the nomination. During the spring and summer of 1854 he made an extensive tour through the Southern and Western States; and, in the spring of 1855, after an excursion in New England, he sailed for Europe, where he remained until June, 1856. While at Rome he received the news of his nomination for the Presidency by the native American party (q. v.). He accepted it, but Maryland alone gave him its el
s with Japan were opened, measures were adopted looking towards the construction of a railway from the Mississippi to the Pacific Ocean, and other measures of great public interest occurred. Mr. Fillmore retired from office March 4, 1853, leaving the country in a state of peace within and without, and every department of industry flourishing. In 1852 he was a candidate of the Whig convention for President of the United States, but did not get the nomination. During the spring and summer of 1854 he made an extensive tour through the Southern and Western States; and, in the spring of 1855, after an excursion in New England, he sailed for Europe, where he remained until June, 1856. While at Rome he received the news of his nomination for the Presidency by the native American party (q. v.). He accepted it, but Maryland alone gave him its electoral vote. The remainder of his life was spent in Buffalo, where he indulged his taste for historical studies, and where he died, March 8, 1874.
August 6th, 1850 AD (search for this): entry fillmore-millard
q. v.). He accepted it, but Maryland alone gave him its electoral vote. The remainder of his life was spent in Buffalo, where he indulged his taste for historical studies, and where he died, March 8, 1874. Texas boundary controversy. On Aug. 6, 1850, President Fillmore transmitted the following special message to the Congress concerning the claims of Texas to territory in dispute: Washington, Aug. 6, 1850. To the Senate and House of Representatives,—I herewith transmit to the two HousAug. 6, 1850. To the Senate and House of Representatives,—I herewith transmit to the two Houses of Congress a letter from his excellency the governor of Texas, dated on June 14 last, addressed to the late President of the United States, which, not having been answered by him, came into my hands on his death; and I also transmit a copy of the answer which I have felt it to be my duty to cause to be made to that communication. Congress will perceive that the governor of Texas officially states that by authority of the legislature of that State he despatched a special commissioner with
ndustry. He acted in Congress with Mr. Adams in favor of receiving petitions for the abolition of slavery. He was opposed to the annexation of Texas, and in favor of the abolition of the interstate slavetrade. In September, 1844, Mr. Fillmore was nominated by the Whigs for governor of the State of New York, but was defeated by Silas Wright, the Democratic candidate. Elected comptroller of his State in 1847, Mr. Fillmore filled that responsible office with rare ability and fidelity. In June, 1848, he was nominated by the Whig National Convention for the office of Vice-President of the United States, and was elected, with General Taylor for President. He resigned the office of comptroller in February following; and on the death of the President (July, 1850), Mr. Fillmore was inducted into that high office. During his administration the slavery question was vehemently discussed, and was finally set at rest, it was hoped, by the passage of various acts which were parts of comprom
September, 1844 AD (search for this): entry fillmore-millard
In 1832 he was elected to Congress as an opponent of Jackson's administration. He was re-elected as a Whig in 1836, and retained his seat, by successive re-elections, until 1842, when he declined a renomination. His career in Congress was marked by ability, integrity, and industry. He acted in Congress with Mr. Adams in favor of receiving petitions for the abolition of slavery. He was opposed to the annexation of Texas, and in favor of the abolition of the interstate slavetrade. In September, 1844, Mr. Fillmore was nominated by the Whigs for governor of the State of New York, but was defeated by Silas Wright, the Democratic candidate. Elected comptroller of his State in 1847, Mr. Fillmore filled that responsible office with rare ability and fidelity. In June, 1848, he was nominated by the Whig National Convention for the office of Vice-President of the United States, and was elected, with General Taylor for President. He resigned the office of comptroller in February following
from the Mississippi to the Pacific Ocean, and other measures of great public interest occurred. Mr. Fillmore retired from office March 4, 1853, leaving the country in a state of peace within and without, and every department of industry flourishing. In 1852 he was a candidate of the Whig convention for President of the United States, but did not get the nomination. During the spring and summer of 1854 he made an extensive tour through the Southern and Western States; and, in the spring of 1855, after an excursion in New England, he sailed for Europe, where he remained until June, 1856. While at Rome he received the news of his nomination for the Presidency by the native American party (q. v.). He accepted it, but Maryland alone gave him its electoral vote. The remainder of his life was spent in Buffalo, where he indulged his taste for historical studies, and where he died, March 8, 1874. Texas boundary controversy. On Aug. 6, 1850, President Fillmore transmitted the followi
March 3rd, 1807 AD (search for this): entry fillmore-millard
he constitutional functions of his office. The second section of the act of Feb. 28, 1795, declares that whenever the laws of the United States shall be opposed or their execution obstructed in any State by combinations too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings or the power vested in marshals, the President may call forth the militia, as far as may be necessary, to suppress such combinations and to cause the laws to be duly executed. By the act of March 3, 1807, it is provided that in all cases of obstruction to the laws, either of the United States or any individual State or Territory, where it is lawful for the President to call forth the militia for the purpose of causing the laws to be duly executed, it shall be lawful for him to employ for the same purposes such part of the land or naval force of the United States as shall be judged necessary. These several enactments are now in full force, so that if the laws of the United States are o
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