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Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry imperialism
ew Jersey, and Georgia. The majority in its favor was large in Connecticut and South Carolina, while in Virginia the majority was only ten votes, and in New York only three. The vote in five of the States stood thus: Pennsylvania, 46 to 23; Massachusetts, 187 to 168; Maryland, 63 to 11; New Hampshire, 57 to 46; New York, 30 to 27. North Carolina and Rhode Island were two years in making up their minds to accept places in the Union. So we see that a majority of about two-thirds (and that may Mountains, on the south by the Ohio River, on the west by the Mississippi, out of which have grown the States of Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, and Indiana, had been claimed under their charters by Virginia, New York, Connecticut, and Massachusetts, but they ceded their claims to the United States. The country so ceded was our first territorial acquisition, and became known as the Northwest Territory. A government was provided for it under the ordinance of 1787, and President Washingt
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): entry imperialism
Imperialism. The Hon. William A. Peffer, ex-Senator from Kansas, makes the following important contribution to the discussion of this question: The arraignment of the national administration by certain citizens on a charge of imperialism, in the execution of its Philippine policy, brings up for discussion some important questions relating to the powers, duties, and responsibilities of government, among which are three that I propose to consider briefly, namely: First. Whence comes the right to govern? What are its sphere and object? Second. Are we, the people of the United States, a self-governing people? Third. Is our Philippine policy anti-American? I. As to the right to govern—the right to exercise authority over communities, states, and nations, the right to enact, construe, and execute laws—whence it is derived? For what purposes and to what extent may it be properly assumed? In the Declaration of Independence it is asserted that: We hold thes
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): entry imperialism
ot permitted to take part in establishing the new government. Furthermore, when the Constitution was submitted to the legislatures of the several States for their action, it was strenuously opposed in some of them, and received unanimous support in only three—Delaware, New Jersey, and Georgia. The majority in its favor was large in Connecticut and South Carolina, while in Virginia the majority was only ten votes, and in New York only three. The vote in five of the States stood thus: Pennsylvania, 46 to 23; Massachusetts, 187 to 168; Maryland, 63 to 11; New Hampshire, 57 to 46; New York, 30 to 27. North Carolina and Rhode Island were two years in making up their minds to accept places in the Union. So we see that a majority of about two-thirds (and that may have been in fact less than a majority of the whole people) assumed to speak and act for all. The people of the United States have all along acted on that plan. We have gone even further than that. We have in some cases ex
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): entry imperialism
total number 757,208 were colored—mostly persons of African descent, who were nearly all slaves, and these, with the other disfranchised classes, as before stated, made up about 33 per cent. of the population that were not permitted to take part in establishing the new government. Furthermore, when the Constitution was submitted to the legislatures of the several States for their action, it was strenuously opposed in some of them, and received unanimous support in only three—Delaware, New Jersey, and Georgia. The majority in its favor was large in Connecticut and South Carolina, while in Virginia the majority was only ten votes, and in New York only three. The vote in five of the States stood thus: Pennsylvania, 46 to 23; Massachusetts, 187 to 168; Maryland, 63 to 11; New Hampshire, 57 to 46; New York, 30 to 27. North Carolina and Rhode Island were two years in making up their minds to accept places in the Union. So we see that a majority of about two-thirds (and that may hav
Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): entry imperialism
, hence, national territories under the sole jurisdiction of the national government, though inhabited by Indians, whose rights to the soil had never been questioned. What has been our policy with respect to this subject race in our new territorial acquisitions we shall now see. The region bounded on the north by the Great Lakes, on the east by the Alleghany Mountains, on the south by the Ohio River, on the west by the Mississippi, out of which have grown the States of Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, and Indiana, had been claimed under their charters by Virginia, New York, Connecticut, and Massachusetts, but they ceded their claims to the United States. The country so ceded was our first territorial acquisition, and became known as the Northwest Territory. A government was provided for it under the ordinance of 1787, and President Washington, in 1789, appointed Gen. Arthur St. Clair its governor. The various tribes of Indians inhabiting that part of the country objected t
Accomack (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): entry imperialism
ting two years, causing much loss of life and property on both sides, and resulting in the utter defeat of the Indians and the cession by them of tracts of land to the colonists. This policy was pursued to the end of the colonial period. The Plymouth colony early sent Captain Standish, with a few men, to confer with the natives and ascertain, if possible, the state of their feelings in regard to the white settlement; but the Indians eluded him and he learned nothing. The second year after t asleep. Philip, in attempting to escape, was recognized by an Indian ally of the whites and shot dead as he stumbled and fell into the mire. His body was dragged forward, and Church cut off his head, which was borne on the point of a spear to Plymouth, where it remained twenty years exposed on a gibbet. According to the colonial laws, as a traitor, his body was drawn and quartered on a day that was appointed for public thanksgiving. With this policy steadily pursued to the end, when the t
New England (United States) (search for this): entry imperialism
stimony of American history, and see the record that Americans have made for themselves in their treatment of subject people in our own country. Virginia and New England may fairly be taken as representative of the colonies up to the time of the Revolution, in so far as the Indian population is concerned. Patents to the Londohe granting of these patents, nor in the subsequent colonization. The London Company colonized Virginia and the Plymouth Company and its successors colonized New England. In both cases landings were effected and settlements begun without consulting the people that inhabited the country. As to Virginia, among the early acts os policy steadily pursued to the end, when the time came for Americans themselves to turn upon their oppressors, there was little left of the Indian question in New England and Virginia, or in any of the States; but, with the Declaration of Independence, the formation of the federal Union, and the establishment of a national govern
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): entry imperialism
ry. Between 1846 and 1866 there were some fifteen or twenty Indian wars or affairs, in which it is estimated that 1,500 whites and 7,000 Indians were killed. In the actions between regular troops and Indians, from 1866 to 1891, the number of whites killed was 1,452; wounded, 1,101. The number of Indians killed was 4,363; wounded, 1,135. Our Indian wars have been expensive as well as bloody. It is estimated by the War Department that, excluding the time covered by our wars with Great Britain (1812-14), and with Mexico (1846-48) and with the Confederate States (1861-65), three-fourths of the total expense of the army is chargeable, directly or indirectly, to the Indians; the aggregate thus chargeable is put at $807,073,658, and this does not include cost of fortifications, posts, and stations; nor does it include amounts reimbursed to the several States ($10,000,000) for their expenses in wars with the Indians. The Indian war pension account in 1897 stood at $28,201,632.
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): entry imperialism
ly all slaves, and these, with the other disfranchised classes, as before stated, made up about 33 per cent. of the population that were not permitted to take part in establishing the new government. Furthermore, when the Constitution was submitted to the legislatures of the several States for their action, it was strenuously opposed in some of them, and received unanimous support in only three—Delaware, New Jersey, and Georgia. The majority in its favor was large in Connecticut and South Carolina, while in Virginia the majority was only ten votes, and in New York only three. The vote in five of the States stood thus: Pennsylvania, 46 to 23; Massachusetts, 187 to 168; Maryland, 63 to 11; New Hampshire, 57 to 46; New York, 30 to 27. North Carolina and Rhode Island were two years in making up their minds to accept places in the Union. So we see that a majority of about two-thirds (and that may have been in fact less than a majority of the whole people) assumed to speak and act f
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): entry imperialism
ories under the sole jurisdiction of the national government, though inhabited by Indians, whose rights to the soil had never been questioned. What has been our policy with respect to this subject race in our new territorial acquisitions we shall now see. The region bounded on the north by the Great Lakes, on the east by the Alleghany Mountains, on the south by the Ohio River, on the west by the Mississippi, out of which have grown the States of Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, and Indiana, had been claimed under their charters by Virginia, New York, Connecticut, and Massachusetts, but they ceded their claims to the United States. The country so ceded was our first territorial acquisition, and became known as the Northwest Territory. A government was provided for it under the ordinance of 1787, and President Washington, in 1789, appointed Gen. Arthur St. Clair its governor. The various tribes of Indians inhabiting that part of the country objected to the jurisdiction of th
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