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wrote to Thomas Garfield in respect to the selection of clergymen for officiating on that occasion:-- Washlngton, May 6, 1865. my dear sir,--Do as you please. The names you mention are excellent. If I could choose one it would be Rev. Mr. Grimes, the colored preacher. It was for his race that President Lincoln died. If Boston adopted him as chaplain on the day when we mourn, it would be a truer homage to our departed president than music or speech. I can say nothing that could prt would be Rev. Mr. Grimes, the colored preacher. It was for his race that President Lincoln died. If Boston adopted him as chaplain on the day when we mourn, it would be a truer homage to our departed president than music or speech. I can say nothing that could promise to be so effective on earth, or welcome in heaven. Think of this, and believe me, my dear sir, Very faithfully yours, Charles Sumner. His request was granted; and the Rev. Mr. Grimes assisted in the solemn services.
Nellie Grant (search for this): chapter 16
call with my carriage at your house, to take you with me to the inauguration ball. Sincerely yours, Abrahiam Lincoln. Mr. Sumner accepted the invitation; the president called for him with his carriage, and on arriving at the ball-room desired him, greatly to the astonishment of those present, to take the arm of Mrs. Lincoln, and the seat of honor. This was Mr. Lincoln's method of terminating personal animosities. By the surrender of the rebel army, under Gen. Robert E. Lee, to Gen. Grant, April 9, Mr. Sumner saw with inexpressible delight the Union saved, and the chains of the bondmen rent asunder. But the hour of gladness often changes unexpectedly to the hour of sorrow. The joy attendant on the realization of his long-cherished hope of peace and freedom was on the evening of the 14th turned to the keenest agony, by the assassination of his noble and beloved friend the president of the United States. Mr. Sumner attended the illustrious patriot in his dying hour; and
Thomas Garfield (search for this): chapter 16
activity and foresight in Congress. his speech on the Constitutional Amendment. on the Freedmen's-bureau Bill. his friendly Relations with Mr. Lincoln. the success of the Union arms. death of Mr. Lincoln. Mr. Sumner's Eulogy. letter to Mr. Garfield. Who is the Honest Man? He who doth still and strongly good pursue, To God, his neighbor, and himself most true. George Herbert. In all things that hare beauty, there is nothing to men more comely than liberty. Give me the liberty to virtues, and his services to the colored people and to the nation, in words of pathos and of power. His constant and high regard for the race whose wrong the nation was so tardy to redress is seen in the following letter, which he wrote to Thomas Garfield in respect to the selection of clergymen for officiating on that occasion:-- Washlngton, May 6, 1865. my dear sir,--Do as you please. The names you mention are excellent. If I could choose one it would be Rev. Mr. Grimes, the col
John Milton (search for this): chapter 16
good pursue, To God, his neighbor, and himself most true. George Herbert. In all things that hare beauty, there is nothing to men more comely than liberty. Give me the liberty to know, to utter, and to argue freely, above all liberties.--John Milton. Thy spirit, Independence, let me share, Lord of the lion heart and eagle eye: Thy steps I'll follow with my bosom bare, Nor heed the storm that howls along the sky. Tobias Smollett. Although Mr. Sumner had labored with untiring assiduiautographs; and, in exhibiting his literary treasures to his friends, he would point with great delight to the Bible which John Bunyan had in Bedford Jail while writing his immortal Pilgrim's progress; to a copy of Pindar, once the property of John Milton; to one of Horace which Philip Melancthon used; to a Testament of the dramatic poet Jean Racine; to some corrected proof-sheets of Pope's famous Essay on man; and especially to the original manuscript of Robert Burns's celebrated battle-song,
Tobias Smollett (search for this): chapter 16
arfield. Who is the Honest Man? He who doth still and strongly good pursue, To God, his neighbor, and himself most true. George Herbert. In all things that hare beauty, there is nothing to men more comely than liberty. Give me the liberty to know, to utter, and to argue freely, above all liberties.--John Milton. Thy spirit, Independence, let me share, Lord of the lion heart and eagle eye: Thy steps I'll follow with my bosom bare, Nor heed the storm that howls along the sky. Tobias Smollett. Although Mr. Sumner had labored with untiring assiduity for the advancement of the Union cause, and in the discussion of international questions had shown himself a master, strenuous efforts were made to prevent his re-election to the Senate. A party opposed to emancipation held what was denominated the People's Convention, in Faneuil Hall, on the seventh day of October, and nominated State officers opposed to the policy of the Republicans. These nominations were adopted by the De
st teachers, if not lawgivers — was a slave; so also was Phaedrus the Roman fabulist, whose lessons are commended by purity and elegance; and so, too, was Aleman the lyric, who shed upon Sparta the grace of poesy. To these add Epictetus, sublime in morals; and Terence, incomparable in comedy, who gave to the world that immortal verse, which excited the applause of the Roman theatre, I am a man; and nothing which concerns mankind is foreign to me. Nor should it be forgotten that the life of Plato was checkered by slavery. On the 27th he spoke in favor of a national currency; and on the 30th he opened the way to a great reform still needed, by the introduction of a bill to provide for the greater efficiency of the civil service. In June following he took an active part in the debates on the Freedmen's Bureau Bill. In the course of his remarks he said: The freedmen are not idlers. They desire work. But in their helpless condition they are not able to obtain it without assistanc
the great philosopher, to its origin. In this charming essay the writer's intimate acquaintance with the French literary and political history of that period appears to great advantage. The Latin verse, as Mr. Sumner clearly shows, was prepared by the celebrated statesman Turgot, who formed it from the line, Eripuit fulmenque Jovi, Phoeboque saggittas, of the Anti-Lucretius, by Cardinal Melchior de Polignac. The cardinal derived his idea from the Astronomicon, an ancient poem by M[arcus Manilius, where the verse appears under the following form, Eripuitque Jovi fulmen, viresque tonandi, which has been translated, Unsceptred Jove,--the Thunderer disarmed. From the critical acumen displayed in this article, it might be supposed that Mr. Sumner had spent his life as a bibliophile, amusing himself with antiquarian researches, and the amenities of literature. He had, indeed, a taste for rare and curious books and autographs; and, in exhibiting his literary treasures to his friends,
Railroad Company, that No person shall be excluded from the cars on account of color. The bill, thus amended, became a law on the 3d of March; and on the 16th of that month he proposed to amend the bill to incorporate the Metropolitan Railroad Company, by adding the words, There shall be no regulation excluding persons from any car on account of color. He also proposed a similar amendment to the bill respecting the Georgetown Railroad Company. These amendments were stoutly opposed by Mr. Saulsbury of Delaware, and others, but were, through the energy of Mr. Sumner, finally carried and enacted. Mr. Hendricks of Indiana said, in respect to Mr. Sumner's persistency in following up his amendments, that it was folly to attempt to oppose him when he had a point to gain. There is no doubt his very earnestness appeared to some as arrogance, and raised an opposition to some of his measures, which otherwise would have been at once accepted. Although he manifested such untiring zeal in re
bill prohibiting commerce in slaves among the several States, which on the second day of July received the signature of the president, and thus broke up the traffic in human flesh between the States. On the 4th of April he made a long and able report on claims on France for spoliations made on our commerce prior to July 31, 1801; and on the 8th he delivered his great speech, entitled No property in man, on the Constitutional Amendment. In this speech he cites the following couplet from Voltaire as the origin of his favorite maxim, equality before the law: -- La lot dans tout état doit être universelle: Les mortels, quels qu'ils soient, sont égaux devant elle. With touching truthfulness he refers to distinguished persons who were called in former times to drink the bitter tears of human servitude. How truly affecting are the words of Homer depicting the wife of Hector toiling as bondwoman at the looms of her Grecian master, or those other undying words which exhibit man
R. H. Neale (search for this): chapter 16
Chapter 16: Mr. Sumner's re-election to the Senate. he Introduces various Bills into that body. the opinion of Mr. Hendricks. letter from Dr. R. H. Neale. Mr. Sumner's activity. his address at Cooper Institute on our Foreign Relations. extracts from the same. a poetical Tribute. death and character of George Sumner. senator Sumner's article on Franklin and Slidell in the Atlantic Monthly. his taste for literary Curiosities. his activity and foresight in Congress. his ve to other issues, and especially to those pertaining to our relations with foreign powers. His course was generally indorsed by thoughtful men in every section of the North. In a letter to Henry Wilson, dated Boston, March 4, 1863, the Rev. R. H. Neale, D. D., said, I have followed your course with increasing admiration from the beginning of your public life, and think I see in you, and also in Mr. Sumner, unmixed and magnanimous regard for the right, and for the public good. Mr. Sumner'
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