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New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
our Sixteenth and Twenty-ninth Regiments. Here, as elsewhere, I found our men in general good health, and earnestly desiring to advance on the enemy. Colonel Wyman is almost idolized by his regiment (the Sixteenth), which he has brought to a high state of discipline. Colonel Pierce had taken command of the Twenty-ninth a short time before my arrival. From all I can learn, his appointment seemed to give general satisfaction; and I believe he will be an efficient and popular officer. The New-York Ninety-ninth is stationed near Fortress Monroe, and commanded by my old friend, Colonel Wardrop. Colonel Wardrop commanded the Third Regiment of Massachusetts Mili tia, in the three months service. As nearly one-half of his regiment is composed of Massachusetts men, I regret he does not hold a Massachusetts commission. Captain Davis's company, to which I have before alluded, is stationed inside of the fortress, and is permanently attached to the garrison. We remained at Fortress Mon
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ichmond, by a change of base from before Washington to the James River. It was not until the middle of April that the Army of the Potomac was ready to advance. Yorktown was captured April 26; and the battle of Williamsburg was fought May 5, in which Hooker's brigade bore a conspicuous part, and the Massachusetts First and Eleven General Banks; and at Warrenton, under General McDowell: and, when the Army of the Potomac moved to James River, they accompanied it to Fortress Monroe, and to Yorktown. Allotments were made by the First, Second, Seventh, Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Thirteenth, Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Eighteenth, Nineteenth, Twentieth, Twenty-secon, commending to their courtesy and co-operation Dr. Alfred Hitchcock and his assistant, Mr. J. W. Wellman, who were detailed to visit the Massachusetts troops at Yorktown, Newbern, or elsewhere, and to render such aid as might be practicable to the sick and wounded in the field or hospitals, and transporting them to their homes.
Shelbyville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
f Massachusetts, dated Richmond, he says,— I have distributed the articles, and find the invoice correct. I find the number of prisoners to be nearly four hundred. By strict economy in the distribution, they are all, with hardly an exception, completely clothed. There are, however, some sailors of the crew of the Massachusetts who are badly off. I hope soon to see them provided for. I have sent part of the clothing forward to those Massachusetts soldiers who are in New Orleans and Tuscaloosa. One hundred and seventy-five, including some of the Fifteenth and Twentieth men, are to be sent to Salisbury, N. C., to-morrow; and the remainder will follow in a short time. Mr. Faulkner called upon me yesterday, and assured me that the rebel privateers in New York were much better cared for than Colonel Lee and his associates in Henrico County jail, and promised to use his influence to render their condition more comfortable. I hope soon to represent Massachusetts under the stars and
Fort Albany (Canada) (search for this): chapter 6
wards changed to the First Heavy Artillery]. The other companies of this command are near, at Forts Albany and Hamilton; the main body being at Fort Albany, the headquarters of Colonel Green. HereFort Albany, the headquarters of Colonel Green. Here he spent an hour, and then rode on to visit the Ninth, Eighteenth, and Twenty-second Regiments, and the Third and Fourth Batteries in General Porter's division. The roads were shocking. He stopped many pleasant hours with this regiment. On my return, Colonel Cass accompanied me as far as Fort Albany. On our way, we called on Major-General Porter, and arranged with him about receiving our Silonel. After warming ourselves and drying our clothes, we started across the country towards Fort Albany, passing through several camps; among them, that of the Nineteenth Indiana, commanded by an old veteran friend of mine, Colonel Meredith. At Fort Albany, we parted with Colonel Cass; he returning to his regiment, and we to Washington, and reached our hotel about six o'clock. We never sa
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
d A. B. Johnson, secretary. This society appointed Miss Lander, of Salem, to distribute proper articles for the sick and wounded. Before thed by the Massachusetts ladies then in Washington. Miss Lander, of Salem, sister of the late General Frederick W. Lander, was a leader in thccompanying him. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and the city of Salem, the place of General Lander's nativity, have received with much seernment of the Commonwealth, and on the part of the municipality of Salem, in the presence of many thousands of his fellow-citizens, and witha letter addressed by him to Mr. Francis H. Fletcher, Pratt Street, Salem, in which he says,— No official information has been receivedts remained on duty until July 1. The Second Company of Cadets, of Salem, commanded by Captain John L. Marks, was mustered in May 26, for gastered out Oct. 11. The company raised by Captain E. H. Staten, of Salem, was also mustered in for garrison duty, and remained on duty until
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
of which there had been reimbursed, by the United States, the sum of $987,263.54; leaving an unpaid State engaged in the naval service of the United States during the existing war, similar to that md to communicate with the President of the United States in regard to obtaining the release of Coloore being mustered into the service of the United States, and what amount may now be due them for c ready and determined. I have got all the United States officials with us, and as many of the surgof his appointment, was a captain of cavalry, U. S.A. He was a graduate of West Point, and distinguhe Governor writes to the President of the United States:— I have the honor, by the hand of fore we pay this tax. This is safe for the United States, and only just to Massachusetts. On thervice in this way; but they belong to the United States. If you will turn over to us one or two oder was received from the President of the United States for thirty companies of infantry, twenty o[2 more...]
Ship Island (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ss Monroe; five regiments were at Annapolis, ready to embark in General Burnside's expedition against North Carolina. One regiment and a battery were at Ship Island, in Mississippi, waiting orders from General Butler. In the Army of the Potomac, we were the strongest. Gunboats officered and manned by Massachusetts men kept watch7, to Fortress Monroe; the Twenty-eighth Regiment, which left the State for South Carolina via New York, Jan. 8; the Sixth Battery, which sailed from Boston for Ship Island, Department of the Gulf, Feb. 7; the Thirty-first Regiment, which sailed in transport for Fortress Monroe, Feb. 21, and from Fortress Monroe to Ship Island, DepShip Island, Department of the Gulf; seven companies, comprising what was known as the Fort Warren Battalion, and afterwards as the Thirty-second Regiment, which were sent forward to the Army of the Potomac, May 26; two companies for the Fourteenth Regiment, shortly afterwards changed to the First Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, which were sent to
Cape Cod (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ield rifles had been contracted for in England; but the English Government had placed an interdict against the export of arms and munitions of war to this country, which prevented, for a time, the completion of the contract. The Governor also referred, at considerable length, to the coast defences of Massachusetts, and the exertions which he had made to have them placed in proper condition. Next to the harbor defences of Boston in importance was the harbor of Provincetown, at the end of Cape Cod, which was accessible in all weathers without a pilot, with excellent anchorage, in which whole navies might ride in safety. It was best adapted to be the base of naval operations. It was utterly undefended, and could easily be taken from us by the enemy. The Governor, in referring to other matters, not of a military character, speaks of the national cause; and as the result of the war, which is but the revolt of slavery, he regards its ultimate extinction as inevitable. Yet I mean, as
Provincetown (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
s. Five thousand more Enfield rifles had been contracted for in England; but the English Government had placed an interdict against the export of arms and munitions of war to this country, which prevented, for a time, the completion of the contract. The Governor also referred, at considerable length, to the coast defences of Massachusetts, and the exertions which he had made to have them placed in proper condition. Next to the harbor defences of Boston in importance was the harbor of Provincetown, at the end of Cape Cod, which was accessible in all weathers without a pilot, with excellent anchorage, in which whole navies might ride in safety. It was best adapted to be the base of naval operations. It was utterly undefended, and could easily be taken from us by the enemy. The Governor, in referring to other matters, not of a military character, speaks of the national cause; and as the result of the war, which is but the revolt of slavery, he regards its ultimate extinction as in
Roanoke Island (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
he House speech of Mr. Bullock of Caleb Cushing proceedings of the Legislature Abstracts of military laws passed Massachusetts prisoners in Richmond clothing sent letter from Adjutant Pierson expedition of General Burnside capture of Roanoke Island Massachusetts troops First to land care of the sick and wounded Dr.Hitchcock sent on the wounded in New York Colonel Frank E. Howe establishment of the New-England rooms care of the sick andWounded the Army of the Potomac the woundeds had encountered a succession of severe storms for nearly two weeks the ships were at sea; great difficulty was encountered in crossing the bar at Cape Hatteras, which was at length successfully surmounted. When the fleet came to anchor off Roanoke Island, an escaped slave came on board the ship to General Burnside, with whom he had a long interview, and gave much valuable information in regard to the best place to land, and the force of the enemy on the island. The troops disembarked on th
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