hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
W. T. Sherman 609 21 Browse Search
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) 565 25 Browse Search
United States (United States) 504 0 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 460 6 Browse Search
J. M. Schofield 408 6 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 371 9 Browse Search
George H. Thomas 312 10 Browse Search
Joe Hooker 309 1 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 303 1 Browse Search
Wesley Merritt 290 4 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 555 total hits in 169 results.

... 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
d intelligent. He is my right-hand man, I also beg to call special attention to Ensign Preble, the Master of this ship, who, whether under fire or any other circumstances, has proved himself without a superior in intelligence or ability on board the vessel. My aid, Master's Mate Cooper, was prompt in answering signals, and in his spare moments used the twelve-pounder howitzer on the hurricane-deck with effect. Thanks to the officers of the powder division, Acting Ensign Burnham, Gunner Waugh, and Sailmaker Holbrook, the ammunition was promptly supplied throughout the engagement. The engines, under the control of Chief-Engineer Johnson and his able assistants, were at all times ready for duty. Boatswain Z. Whitmarsh and Carpenter J. E. Miller, stationed in the master's division, not only performed their own duties with intelligence, but gave valuable aid whenever they could. The subordinate officers of the divisions, the captains of the guns and their spirited crews,
W. J. Latham (search for this): chapter 196
ormation of the engineer department. In this it only remains for me to express my grateful sense of the gallantry, endurance, and skill of the garrison and its accomplished commander. To the latter I have already paid a just tribute of praise, not for this action only, but for his whole course at Fort Fisher, of which this action and its result is but the fruit. His report of the gallantry of individuals I fully confirm from my own observation. I wish to mention Captain Mann, Lieutenant Latham, Lieutenant Hunter, of the Thirty-sixth; Lieutenant Rankin of the first battalion; Captain Adams of the light artillery, as very active and efficient. To Colonel Tansill of my staff we owe many thanks. To his skilful judgment and great experience the defence of the land front was committed at the critical moment of assault. Of Major Riley, with his battery of the Tenth Carolina, who served the guns of the land front during the entire action, I have to say he has added another name
Martin Mann (search for this): chapter 196
arded for the information of the engineer department. In this it only remains for me to express my grateful sense of the gallantry, endurance, and skill of the garrison and its accomplished commander. To the latter I have already paid a just tribute of praise, not for this action only, but for his whole course at Fort Fisher, of which this action and its result is but the fruit. His report of the gallantry of individuals I fully confirm from my own observation. I wish to mention Captain Mann, Lieutenant Latham, Lieutenant Hunter, of the Thirty-sixth; Lieutenant Rankin of the first battalion; Captain Adams of the light artillery, as very active and efficient. To Colonel Tansill of my staff we owe many thanks. To his skilful judgment and great experience the defence of the land front was committed at the critical moment of assault. Of Major Riley, with his battery of the Tenth Carolina, who served the guns of the land front during the entire action, I have to say he has ad
K. R. Breeze (search for this): chapter 196
angement to sacrifice themselves in case the vessel was boarded — a thing likely to happen. I enclose herewith the report of Commander Rhind, with the names of the gallant fellows who volunteered for this desperate service. Allow me also to mention the name of Mr. Bradford, of the Coast Survey, who went in and sounded out the place where the Louisiana was to go in, and has always patiently performed every duty that he has been called on to carry out. My thanks are due to Lieutenant Commander K. R. Breeze, fleet captain, for carrying about my orders to the fleet during the action, and for his general usefulness; to Lieutenant Commander H. A. Adams for his promptness in supplying the fleet with ammunition. Lieutenant M. W. Sanders, Signal Officer, whose whole time was occupied in making signals, performed his duty well; and my aids, Lieutenant S. W. Terry and Lieutenant S. W. Preston, afforded me valuable assistance. I have not yet received a list of the casualties, but belie
James Alden (search for this): chapter 196
hen they got into place both ships delivered a fire that nothing could withstand. The Brooklyn well sustained her proud name under her present commander, Captain James Alden; and the Colorado gave evidence that her commander, Commodore H. K. Thatcher, fully understood the duties of his position. The Susquehanna was most effectiam, very respectfully, &c., Daniel B. Ridgely, Captain, United States Navy. Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commanding North Atlantic Squadron. Report of Captain James Alden. United States steamer Brooklyn, off Beaufort, N. C. December 30, 1864 sir — I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of General Order, No. 75, wh toward Fort Fisher, they would have been in it before dark, and in quiet possession without firing a shot. With great respect, I am your obedient servant, James Alden, Captain. Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commanding North Atlantic Squadron. Report of Com. J. C. Howell. United States steamer Nereus, Beaufort, N. C.
E. L. Haines (search for this): chapter 196
y. Some sixty-five or seventy prisoners were taken. At 9:45 one of the Nereus' boats returned, the officer stating that he had been employed embarking troops. December twenty-sixth, heavy sea on. But one boat, and that in charge of Acting Master E. L. Haines, of this vessel, got off during the day. Engaged shelling woods during the day and night. December twenty-seventh, boats and men employed in embarking troops; shelling woods. At about twelve M. General Curtis and two officers visited the ship. General Curtis desired to express his acknowledgments to Acting Master E. L. Haines and Ensign G. M. Smith, and the boats' crews of the Nereus, for courage and perseverance in getting off his command. He informed me that if he had not been ordered back, and had been supported by the troops on shore, he could, in his opinion, have carried Fort Fisher. From all the information I have been able to gain on the subject, I think he was correct in his views. There was no exception to
O. S. Glisson (search for this): chapter 196
al Weitzel to see me, and arrange the programme for the day. It was decided that we should attack the forts again, while the army landed and assaulted them, if possible, under our heavy fire. I sent seventeen gunboats, under command of Captain O. S. Glisson, to cover the troops and assist with their boats in landing the soldiers. Finding the smaller vessels kept too far from the beach, which was quite bold, I sent in the Brooklyn to set them an example, which that vessel did, relying, as evange, the object seemed mainly to disable them, but a rapid fire soon closed them up. Everything was coolly and systematically done throughout the day, and I witnessed some beautiful practice. The army commenced landing about two o'clock, Captain Glisson, in the Santiago de Cuba, having shelled Flag-pond battery to ensure a safe landing, and they commenced to re-embark about five o'clock, the weather coming on thick and rainy. About a brigade were left on the beach during the night, covered
Robert Montgomery (search for this): chapter 196
e set by the clocks, to one hour and a half, but the explosion did not occur till twenty-two minutes after that time had elapsed, the after part of the vessel being then enveloped in flames. The following officers and men manned the powder-boat: Commander A. C. Rhind; Lieutenant S. W. Preston; Second Assistant Engineer A. T. E. Mullan; Master's Mate Paul Boyden; Frank Lucas, coxswain; William Garvin, captain forecastle; Charles J. Bibber, gunner's mate; John Neil, quarter gunner; Robert Montgomery; captain after-guard; James Roberts, seaman, Charles Hawkins, seaman; Dennis Conlon, seaman; James Sullivan, ordinary seaman; William Hinnegan, second-class fireman; Charles Rice, coal-heaver. The crew were all volunteers from my own vessel, the Agawam. The zeal, patience, and endurance of officers and men were unsurpassed, and I believe no officer could have been better supported. To Lieutenant Lamson, Mr Bradford, and the officers and men of the Wilderness, we are indebted for
radford, of the Coast Survey, having gone in at night and ascertained that we could place a vessel of seven feet draught right on the edge of the beach; Lieutenant R. H. Lamson, commanding Gettysburg, volunteered to go in the Wilderness, Acting Master Henry Arey in command, and tow the Louisiana into position, having assisted in the gale in taking care of the Louisiana after she and the Nansemond (the vessel having her in tow) had lost all their anchors. At half-past 10 P. M. the powder-vesseand Mr. Bowen, bar pilot — the local knowledge and judgment of these gentlemen being of the greatest service to me in perfecting all the arrangements and carrying out the plan successfully. The party on board the Wilderness, commanded by Acting Ensign H. Arey, shared with us whatever of risk or danger attended the enterprise. Our arrangements being completed, we started in from the station vessel--the Kansas, Lieutenant Commanding Watmough--at about 10:30 P. M. At about 11:30 the Wilderness
uehanna, Brooklyn, Powhatan, Juniata, Seneca, Shenandoah, Pawtuxet, Ticonderoga, Mackinaw, Maumee, Yantic, Kansas, Iosco, Quaker City, Monticello, Rhode Island, Sassacus, Chippewa, Osceola, Tacony, Pontoosuc, Santiago de Cuba, Fort Jackson, and Vanderbilt, having a reserve of small vessels, consisting of the Aries, Howquah, Wilderness, Cherokee, A. D. Vance, Anemone, Aeolus, Gettysburg, Alabama, Keystone State, Banshee, Emma, Lillian, Tristram Shandy, Britannia, Governor Buckingham, and Nansemoneir bomb-proofs. The small gunboats Kansas, Unadilla, Pequot. Seneca, Pontoosuc, Yantic, and Huron took positions to the northward and eastward of the monitors, and enfilading the works. The Shenandoah, Ticonderoga, Mackinaw, Tacony, and Vanderbilt took effective positions as marked on the chart, and added their fire to that already begun. The Santiago de Cuba, Fort Jackson, Osceola, Chippewa, Sassacus, Rhode Island, Monticello, Quaker City, and Iosco dropped into position according to
... 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17