hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
W. T. Sherman 609 21 Browse Search
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) 565 25 Browse Search
United States (United States) 504 0 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 460 6 Browse Search
J. M. Schofield 408 6 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 371 9 Browse Search
George H. Thomas 312 10 Browse Search
Joe Hooker 309 1 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 303 1 Browse Search
Wesley Merritt 290 4 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

Found 555 total hits in 169 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
N. A. Squadon (search for this): chapter 196
aken the fort immediately after the second day's bombardment, with but little loss. All the officers and men belonging to the New Ironsides served their guns and country well; and I am greatly indebted to Lieutenant Commander Phythian, the Executive Officer, for his energy and ability in getting the crew and ship in such good fighting order. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, William Radford. Commodore, Commanding Iron-clad Division. Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commanding N. A. Squadon, Flag-Ship Malvern, Report of Captain William R. Taylor. United States ship Juniata, off Beaufort, N. C., December 30, 1864. sir — I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your General Order, No. 75, and I rise from my sick-bed to give it an instant reply. The part that this ship took in the actions of the twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth instant was as follows: On each day she took the position assigned to her in your plan of battle, and kept up a constant fire upon F
Canonicus, Mahopac, Monadnock, Minnesota, Colorado, Mohican, Tuscarora, Wabash, Susquehanna, Brooklyn, Powhatan, Juniata, Seneca, Shenandoah, Pawtuxet, Ticonderoga, Mackinaw, Maumee, Yantic, Kansas, Iosco, Quaker City, Monticello, Rhode Island, Sassacus, Chippewa, Osceola, Tacony, Pontoosuc, Santiago de Cuba, Fort Jackson, and Vanderbilt, having a reserve of small vessels, consisting of the Aries, Howquah, Wilderness, Cherokee, A. D. Vance, Anemone, Aeolus, Gettysburg, Alabama, Keystone State, rs, and enfilading the works. The Shenandoah, Ticonderoga, Mackinaw, Tacony, and Vanderbilt took effective positions as marked on the chart, and added their fire to that already begun. The Santiago de Cuba, Fort Jackson, Osceola, Chippewa, Sassacus, Rhode Island, Monticello, Quaker City, and Iosco dropped into position according to order, and the battle became general. In one hour and fifteen minutes after the first shot was fired not a shot came from the fort. Two magazines had been blo
W. T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 196
o the surprise and mortification of all, General Butler stopped the further disembarkation of the troops, and gave orders to re-embark those already on shore. I congratulate you, sir, upon the brilliant share the navy took in the attack of the twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth; the work was well done. Had the army performed their part, the Federal flag would now be flying over the ramparts of Fort Fisher--a fitting Christmas present to be side and side with that of the glorious and gallant Sherman. I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, T. C. Harris, Lieutenant-Commander. Rear-Admiral D. D. Porter, Commanding North Atlantic Squadron. Additional report of rear-admiral Porter. North Atlantic Squadron, U. S. Flag-ship Malvern, off New Inlet, December 27, 1864. sir — My despatch of yesterday will give you an account of our operations, but will scarcely give you an idea of my disappointment at the conduct of the army authorities in not attem
H. E. Mullan (search for this): chapter 196
d, in his opinion, have carried Fort Fisher. From all the information I have been able to gain on the subject, I think he was correct in his views. There was no exception to the excellent conduct of officers and men. I am indebted to Lieutenant H. E. Mullan for intelligent services. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant. J. C. Howell, Commander. Rear-Admiral D. D. Porter, Commanding N. A. Squadron, Beaufort, N. C. Report of Com. Daniel Ammen. United States steamer Mohi to the tide if anchored. The anchor was accordingly let go, the fires hauled as well as possible. and the men put into the boat Lieutenant Preston and I then proceeded to light the fuses and fires. The latter were arranged by Second Assistant Engineer Mullan. When all was fairly done, we observed that the vessel would not tail in-shore, and therefore I let go another anchor with short scope. We then took to the boat and reached the Wilderness in safety at precisely midnight, slipped her
John L. Hancock (search for this): chapter 196
ing at this, nor of relaxing your endeavors to obtain the right kind of troops for the business, the right number, and the proper means of taking the place, even if we fail in an assault. Every attack we make we will improve in firing, and if the weather would permit, I could level the works in a week's firing, strong as they are; but it is only one day in six that a vessel can anchor so close. We had a most beautiful time, and the weather for the attack was just what we wanted. If General Hancock, with ten thousand men, was sent down here, we could walk into the fort. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Effect of the Exlposion of the powder-boat. North Atlantic Squadron, U. S. Flag-ship Malvern, off New Inlet, December 28, 1864. sir — I am enabled, from information gained from prisoners, to tell you what effect the explosion had on the rebels in and about F
Tristram Shandy (search for this): chapter 196
Minnesota, Colorado, Mohican, Tuscarora, Wabash, Susquehanna, Brooklyn, Powhatan, Juniata, Seneca, Shenandoah, Pawtuxet, Ticonderoga, Mackinaw, Maumee, Yantic, Kansas, Iosco, Quaker City, Monticello, Rhode Island, Sassacus, Chippewa, Osceola, Tacony, Pontoosuc, Santiago de Cuba, Fort Jackson, and Vanderbilt, having a reserve of small vessels, consisting of the Aries, Howquah, Wilderness, Cherokee, A. D. Vance, Anemone, Aeolus, Gettysburg, Alabama, Keystone State, Banshee, Emma, Lillian, Tristram Shandy, Britannia, Governor Buckingham, and Nansemond. Previous to making the attack, a torpedo on a large scale, with an amount of powder on board, supposed to be sufficient to explode the powder magazines of the fort, was prepared with great care, and placed under the command of Commander A. C. Rhind, who had associated with him on this perilous service Lieutenant S. W. Preston, Second Assistant Engineer A. T. E. Mullan, of the United States steamer Agawam, and Acting Master's Mate Paul B
J. C. Armstrong (search for this): chapter 196
n. Lieutenant Chapman, Confederate States navy, commanding battery Buchanan, by his skilful gunnery saved us on our right from a movement of the enemy, which, unless checked, might have resulted in a successful passage. The navy detachment at the guns, under very trying circumstances, did good work. No commendations of mine can be too much for the coolness, discipline and skill displayed by officers and men. Their names have not all been furnished to me, but Lieutenants Roby, Doing, Armstrong, and Berrien attracted special attention throughout. To Passed Midshipman Carey I wish to give personal thanks. Though wounded, he reported after the bursting of his gun, to repel the threatened assault, and actively assisted Colonel Tansill on the land front. Above all, and before all, we shall be grateful, and I trust all are, for the favor of Almighty God, under and by which a signal deliverance has been achieved. Very respectfully, W. H. C. Whiting, Major-General. Lieutenan
Col J. H. Burnham (search for this): chapter 196
collected, calm and intelligent. He is my right-hand man, I also beg to call special attention to Ensign Preble, the Master of this ship, who, whether under fire or any other circumstances, has proved himself without a superior in intelligence or ability on board the vessel. My aid, Master's Mate Cooper, was prompt in answering signals, and in his spare moments used the twelve-pounder howitzer on the hurricane-deck with effect. Thanks to the officers of the powder division, Acting Ensign Burnham, Gunner Waugh, and Sailmaker Holbrook, the ammunition was promptly supplied throughout the engagement. The engines, under the control of Chief-Engineer Johnson and his able assistants, were at all times ready for duty. Boatswain Z. Whitmarsh and Carpenter J. E. Miller, stationed in the master's division, not only performed their own duties with intelligence, but gave valuable aid whenever they could. The subordinate officers of the divisions, the captains of the guns and the
G. M. Smith (search for this): chapter 196
tating that he had been employed embarking troops. December twenty-sixth, heavy sea on. But one boat, and that in charge of Acting Master E. L. Haines, of this vessel, got off during the day. Engaged shelling woods during the day and night. December twenty-seventh, boats and men employed in embarking troops; shelling woods. At about twelve M. General Curtis and two officers visited the ship. General Curtis desired to express his acknowledgments to Acting Master E. L. Haines and Ensign G. M. Smith, and the boats' crews of the Nereus, for courage and perseverance in getting off his command. He informed me that if he had not been ordered back, and had been supported by the troops on shore, he could, in his opinion, have carried Fort Fisher. From all the information I have been able to gain on the subject, I think he was correct in his views. There was no exception to the excellent conduct of officers and men. I am indebted to Lieutenant H. E. Mullan for intelligent services.
y his skilful gunnery saved us on our right from a movement of the enemy, which, unless checked, might have resulted in a successful passage. The navy detachment at the guns, under very trying circumstances, did good work. No commendations of mine can be too much for the coolness, discipline and skill displayed by officers and men. Their names have not all been furnished to me, but Lieutenants Roby, Doing, Armstrong, and Berrien attracted special attention throughout. To Passed Midshipman Carey I wish to give personal thanks. Though wounded, he reported after the bursting of his gun, to repel the threatened assault, and actively assisted Colonel Tansill on the land front. Above all, and before all, we shall be grateful, and I trust all are, for the favor of Almighty God, under and by which a signal deliverance has been achieved. Very respectfully, W. H. C. Whiting, Major-General. Lieutenant-Colonel A. Anderson, A. A. and I. G., Headquarters Department of N. C. P
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...