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in our Rotunda is a sight. General Sheridan, dressed in plain clothes, is standing near a shaft, puffing his cigar, and chatting with his friends. Is it design or accident, his standing with his back against that shaft, so that his person is covered from assault except in front? About him fret and seethe a crowd of citizens, many of them bearing proud, historic names. General Ogden is here, General Taylor is here, and General Penn is here. The lame man pushing through the crowd is General Badger, now recovering from his wounds. The gentlemen near Sheridan, also in plain clothes, are General Emory and Colonel Sheridan, a younger brother of the chief. Banditti! How the Southern fire darts out, the Southern pride expands, as Senator and General cross the hall, restrained alike by courtesy and policy from rushing on the man who calls them outlaws and is only waiting for a word to string them up! With what a cold and haughty mien these magnates pass the shaft against which Sherida
te Revival. Eloquent words are ringing through the air; Republicans joining voices with Democrats in denouncing the policy of President Grant. The venerable Bryant leads the way in New York; the liberal Adams is the spokesman of Massachusetts. Evarts lends his name to what is little less than an impeachment of the President and his Cabinet. These practices, cries Bryant, must be denounced, must be stopped, must be broken up for ever! What right, asks Adams, have soldiers of the United States to determine who shall sit in the Legislature of a State? Evarts brings the matter home: Here we have a national gensdarmerie instead of a civil police! The Legislature of Louisiana is as much a part of our Government as the Legislature of New York. Men who have never before this moment mixed in politics, leave their books and join these enemies of President Grant. Here is an act done in a time of peace, says Curtis, so dangerous to all civil freedom, so bold and reckless a violation of
Hamilton Fish (search for this): chapter 11
perior, and some of the leading journals are demanding that Grant shall retire from the White House, leaving his powers in Wilson's hands. More than all else, Hamilton Fish declares that if the President sustains Sheridan and justifies Durell and Packard, he will resign his post as Secretary of State. This menace tells. Fish is Fish is not only the ablest man in Grant's Cabinet, but one of the ablest men in America. Bristow, Secretary of the Treasury, takes the same line as Fish. Without these gentlemen, the President's Cabinet could not stand a week; and if his Cabinet falls, who knows what else may fall? The Governors of powerful States are talking in an Fish. Without these gentlemen, the President's Cabinet could not stand a week; and if his Cabinet falls, who knows what else may fall? The Governors of powerful States are talking in an ominous way. A State has disappeared, says Governor Alien to the people of Ohio; a sovereign State of this Union has no existence this night. A sovereign State! The President thinks he put an end to all that babble about sovereign States on the battle field, and here, in one of the rich and populous northern cities, the Governor
ms. Caesarism is answered by a White Revival. Eloquent words are ringing through the air; Republicans joining voices with Democrats in denouncing the policy of President Grant. The venerable Bryant leads the way in New York; the liberal Adams is the spokesman of Massachusetts. Evarts lends his name to what is little less than an impeachment of the President and his Cabinet. These practices, cries Bryant, must be denounced, must be stopped, must be broken up for ever! What right, asks Adams, have soldiers of the United States to determine who shall sit in the Legislature of a State? Evarts brings the matter home: Here we have a national gensdarmerie instead of a civil police! The Legislature of Louisiana is as much a part of our Government as the Legislature of New York. Men who have never before this moment mixed in politics, leave their books and join these enemies of President Grant. Here is an act done in a time of peace, says Curtis, so dangerous to all civil freedom,
s, and the corridors boom with voices, like the uproar of a stormy sea. To-night the scene in our Rotunda is a sight. General Sheridan, dressed in plain clothes, is standing near a shaft, puffing his cigar, and chatting with his friends. Is it design or accident, his standing with his back against that shaft, so that his person is covered from assault except in front? About him fret and seethe a crowd of citizens, many of them bearing proud, historic names. General Ogden is here, General Taylor is here, and General Penn is here. The lame man pushing through the crowd is General Badger, now recovering from his wounds. The gentlemen near Sheridan, also in plain clothes, are General Emory and Colonel Sheridan, a younger brother of the chief. Banditti! How the Southern fire darts out, the Southern pride expands, as Senator and General cross the hall, restrained alike by courtesy and policy from rushing on the man who calls them outlaws and is only waiting for a word to string th
January 13th, 1875 AD (search for this): chapter 11
Chapter 11: the Rotunda. Scene-Rotunda, New Orleans; marble floor, and open galleries, supported by fluted shafts. Time-Wednesday, January 13, 1875, eight o'clock in the evening. Persons present-General Sheridan, with his staff, Lieutenant-governor Penn, Senators, Members of Congress, foreign consuls, sea captains, newspaper scouts, orderlies, messengers, telegraph clerks, and other crowds, including two English travellers. Temperature-boiling point of mercury. Look out for squalls, drops a well-known voice, as we emerge from the dining-hall into the Rotunda. The affair is on, and must be settled .either yea or nay. If Grant backs down, there will be peace; if not, there will be war. Look out! Before you go to bed, the world will know the worst. The central hall of our hotel is a grand apartment — the Rotunda of an edifice which in Italy would be called a palace; a news-room, lounge, divan, and stock exchange; a place where merchants buy and sell, where gamblers s
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