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ter-pails were in great demand for use in the cars on the journey, and also empty bottles to take the place of canteens. All our whisky and brandy bottles were washed and filled up at the spring, and the boys went off carefully hugging their extemporized canteens, from which they would wet their wounds, or refresh themselves till the journey ended. I do not think that a man of the sixteen thousand who were transported during our stay, went from Gettysburg without a good meal. Rebels and Unionists together, they all had it, and were pleased and satisfied. Have you friends in the army, madam? a rebel soldier, lying on the floor of the car, said to me, as I gave him some milk. Yes, my brother is on--'s staff. I thought so, ma'am. You can always tell; when people are good to soldiers they are sure to have friends in the army. We are rebels, you know, ma'am, another said. Do you treat rebels so? It was strange to see the good brotherly feeling come over the soldiers, our own an
The Misses Woolsey. Social position of the Woolsey sisters Mrs. Joseph lowland and her labors on the Hospital Transport her tender and skilful nursing of the sick and wounded of her husband's regiment poem addressed to her by a soldier her encouragement and assistance to the women nurses appointed by Miss Dix Mrs. Robert S. Howland her labors in the hospitals and at the Metropolitan Sanitary Fair her early death from over-exertion in connection with the Fair her poetical cont war, in which four sisters have together consecrated their services to the cause of the nation. In social position, culture, refinement, and all that could make life pleasant, Misses Georgiana and Jane C. Woolsey, and their married sisters, Mrs. Joseph and Mrs. Robert Howland, were blessed above most women; and if there were any who might have deemed themselves excused from entering upon the drudgery, the almost menial service incident to the Hospital Transport service, to the position of As
Jane Stuart Woolsey (search for this): chapter 12
andkerchiefs only a blue one the man who screamed so the German mother the Oregon lieutenant soup put some meat in a little water and stirred it round Miss Woolsey's rare capacities for her work estimate of a lady friend Miss Jane Stuart Woolsey labors in hospitals her charge of the Freedmen at Richmond Miss Sarah C. Woolsey, at Portsmouth Grove Hospital We are not aware of any other instance among the women who have devoted themselves to works of philanthropy and patriotiduring Grant's great campaign of the spring, summer, and autumn of 1864, she was most effectively engaged at the front, or rather at the great depots for the wounded, at Belle Plain, Port Royal, Fredericksburg, White House, and City Point. Miss Jane S. Woolsey, also served in general hospitals as lady superintendent until the close of the war, and afterward transferred her efforts to the work among the Freedmen at Richmond, Virginia. A cousin of these ladies, Miss Sarah C. Woolsey, daughter o
Georgiana M. Woolsey (search for this): chapter 12
over-exertion in connection with the Fair her poetical contributions to the national cause in the Hospital Miss Georgiana M. Woolsey labors on Hospital Transports at Portsmouth Grove Hospital after Chancellorsville her work at Gettysburg wicreamed so the German mother the Oregon lieutenant soup put some meat in a little water and stirred it round Miss Woolsey's rare capacities for her work estimate of a lady friend Miss Jane Stuart Woolsey labors in hospitals her charge oblue be dim; These stripes, no less than stars, Lead after Him. Mrs. Howland died in the summer of 1864. Miss Georgiana M. Woolsey, was one of the most efficient ladies connected with the Hospital Transport service, where her constant cheerfur--: What we did at Gettysburg, for the three weeks we were there, you will want to know. We, are Mrs. Her mother, Mrs. Woolsey. and I, who, happening to be on hand at the right moment, gladly fell in with the proposition to do what we could at t
Katherine Prescott Wormeley (search for this): chapter 12
ent ladies connected with the Hospital Transport service, where her constant cheerfulness, her ready wit, her never failing resources of contrivance and management in any emergency, made the severe labor seem light, and by keeping up the spirits of the entire party, prevented the scenes of suffering constantly presented from rendering them morbid or depressed. She took the position of assistant superintendent of the Portsmouth Grove General Hospital, in September, 1862, when her friend, Miss Wormeley, became superintendent, and remained there till the spring of 1863, was actively engaged in the care of the wounded at Falmouth after the battle of Chancellorsville, was on the field soon after the battle of Gettysburg, and wrote that charming and graphic account of the labors of herself and a friend at Gettysburg in the service of the Sanitary Commission which was so widely circulated, and several times reprinted in English reviews and journals. We cannot refrain from introducing it a
Kilpatrick (search for this): chapter 12
lest ones went round, and what turned up in the going. Twenty-four hours we were in making the journey between Baltimore and Gettysburg, places only four hours apart in ordinary running time; and this will give you some idea of the difficulty there was in bringing up supplies when the fighting was over, and of the delays in transporting wounded. Coming toward the town at this crawling rate, we passed some fields where the fences were down and the ground slightly tossed up: That's where Kilpatrick's Cavalry-men fought the rebels, some one said; and close by that barn a rebel soldier was found day before yesterday, sitting dead --no one to help, poor soul,--near the whole city full. The railroad bridge broken up by the enemy, Government had not rebuilt as yet, and we stopped two miles from the town, to find that, as usual, just where the Government had left off the Commission came in. There stood their temporary lodge and kitchen, and here, hobbling out of their tents, came the wou
Jane C. Woolsey (search for this): chapter 12
dy friend Miss Jane Stuart Woolsey labors in hospitals her charge of the Freedmen at Richmond Miss Sarah C. Woolsey, at Portsmouth Grove Hospital We are not aware of any other instance among the women who have devoted themselves to works of philanthropy and patriotism during the recent war, in which four sisters have together consecrated their services to the cause of the nation. In social position, culture, refinement, and all that could make life pleasant, Misses Georgiana and Jane C. Woolsey, and their married sisters, Mrs. Joseph and Mrs. Robert Howland, were blessed above most women; and if there were any who might have deemed themselves excused from entering upon the drudgery, the almost menial service incident to the Hospital Transport service, to the position of Assistant Superintendent of a crowded hospital, of nurse in field hospitals after a great battle, or of instructors and superintendents of freedmen and freedwomen; these ladies might have pleaded an apology for
k at Gettysburg with her mother three weeks at Gettysburg the approach to the battle-field the Sanitary Commission's Lodge near the railroad depot the supply tent crutches supplying rebels and Union men alike dressing wounds on dress paraing to be on hand at the right moment, gladly fell in with the proposition to do what we could at the Sanitary Commission Lodge after the battle. There were, of course, the agents of the Commission, already on the field, distributing supplies to thin its strength, Tell her I love her. Late one afternoon, too late for the cars, a train of ambulances arrived at our Lodge with over one hundred wounded rebels, to be cared for through the night. Only one among them seemed too weak and faint tptly sent to meet them, and Government cannot provide for mistakes and delays; so that, but for the Sanitary Commission's Lodge and comfortable supplies, for which the wounded are indebted to the hard workers at home, men badly hurt must have suffer
Jane S. Woolsey (search for this): chapter 12
th a Sanitary Commission attachment. Our work was over, our tents were struck, and we came away after a flourish of trumpets from two military bands who filed down to our door, and gave us a farewell Red, white, and blue. One who knows Miss Woolsey well says of her, Her sense, energy, lightness, and quickness of action; her thorough knowledge of the work, her amazing yet simple resources, her shy humility which made her regard her own work with impatience, almost with contempt-all this aough no one but Georgy would ever have dreamt of it. Her pity for the sufferings of the men was something pathetic in itself, but it was never morbid, never unwise, never derived from her own shock at the sight, always practical and healthy. Miss Woolsey remained in the service through the war, a part of the time in charge of hospitals, but during Grant's great campaign of the spring, summer, and autumn of 1864, she was most effectively engaged at the front, or rather at the great depots for t
omplished rapidly. She saw a need before others saw it, and she supplied it often by some ingenious contrivance which answered every purpose, though no one but Georgy would ever have dreamt of it. Her pity for the sufferings of the men was something pathetic in itself, but it was never morbid, never unwise, never derived from her own shock at the sight, always practical and healthy. Miss Woolsey remained in the service through the war, a part of the time in charge of hospitals, but during Grant's great campaign of the spring, summer, and autumn of 1864, she was most effectively engaged at the front, or rather at the great depots for the wounded, at Belle Plain, Port Royal, Fredericksburg, White House, and City Point. Miss Jane S. Woolsey, also served in general hospitals as lady superintendent until the close of the war, and afterward transferred her efforts to the work among the Freedmen at Richmond, Virginia. A cousin of these ladies, Miss Sarah C. Woolsey, daughter of Preside
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