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Henry W. Bowen (search for this): chapter 14
7. Population in 1860, 13,395; in 1865, 14,403. Valuation in 1860, $6,780,000; in 1865, $7,706,745. The city officers in 1861 were Frank B. Fay, mayor; John R. Dufur, Albert Bisbee, George W. Churchill, James B. Forsyth, Eben W. Lothrop, Henry W. Bowen, Nehemiah Boynton, Noble M. Perkins, aldermen. In 1862, Frank B. Fay, mayor; John R. Dufur, Albert Bisbee, Jesse Gould, Benjamin J. Gerrish, Eben W. Lothrop, James P. Farley, Henry W. Bowen, John T. Hadaway, Francis Low, aldermen. 1863, FraHenry W. Bowen, John T. Hadaway, Francis Low, aldermen. 1863, Frank B. Fay, mayor; John R. Dufur, Albert Bisbee, Jesse Gould, James B. Forsyth, Eben W. Lothrop, James F. Farley, Francis Low, John T. Hadaway, aldermen. In 1864, Eustace C. Fitz, mayor; Albert Bisbee, Rufus Trussell, James B. Forsyth, John H. Osgood, Maurice M. Pigott, Eben W. Lothrop, Joseph Everdean, Samuel W. Mason, aldermen. In 1865, Eustace C. Fitz, mayor; Albert Bisbee, Elisha H. Ryder, Jesse Gould, William O. Haskell, Eben W. Lothrop, Maurice M. Pigott, Joseph Everdean, Samuel W. Mason,
dollars for the payment of State aid. February 10th, It was ordered that Aldermen Rich, Hanson, and Henshaw, with such as the council may join, be a committee on military affairs to make provision for troops passing through the city, either to or from the seat of war, and to attend to other matters in relation to the volunteers that may come before the city council. The order was amended in the council, so that the expense should not exceed ten thousand dollars, and Messrs. Edmunds, Tyler, Child, Tucker, and Hatch of the council were joined. February 22d, By a previous vote of the city the government with a large assemblage of the people met in Faneuil Hall. Prayer was made by Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D., and Washington's Farewell Address was read by George S. Hillard, Esq. March 3d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow twenty thousand dollars for the payment of State aid. March 31st, Twenty thousand dollars additional were ordered to be borrowed for the same object. On the
Joseph F. Faul (search for this): chapter 14
made by Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D., and Washington's Farewell Address was read by George S. Hillard, Esq. March 3d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow twenty thousand dollars for the payment of State aid. March 31st, Twenty thousand dollars additional were ordered to be borrowed for the same object. On the 7th of April the City-Relief Committee for the payment of State aid to soldiers' families was organized as follows: Aldermen Thomas C. Amory, Otis Norcross, Francis Richards, Joseph F. Faul; councilmen Joseph Buckley, William Carpenter, John S. Pear, Sumner Crosby, F. H. Sprague; Charles J. McCarthy, paymaster; Timothy R. Page, relief clerk. June 23d, A vote of thanks was passed to Colonel Thomas Cass and the Ninth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers for a present to the city of Boston of a Rebel flag, taken at the battle of Hanover Court House, Va., on the 27th ultimo. June 30th, A communication was received from Mayor Wightman recommending that a lot in Mount Hope Cemeter
Edward Pratt (search for this): chapter 14
society was organized there were made and forwarded for the use of disabled soldiers 1,105 articles of clothing and bedding, 52 packages of food and delicacies, 107 bottles of wine and cordials, besides compresses, bandages, pads, etc. North Chelsea Incorporated March 19, 1848. Name changed to Revere, 1871. Population in 1860, 921; in 1865, 858. Valuation in 1860, $770,000; in 1865, $860,359. The selectmen in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864 were Benjamin Shurtleff, Ensign Kimball, Edward Pratt; in 1865, Benjamin Shurtleff, Ensign Kimball, William S. Janvin. The town-clerk during all the years of the war was William T. Hall. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864 was Benjamin H. Dewing; in 1865, John F. Fenno. 1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town in its corporate capacity in relation to the war during this year, although the families of the soldiers belonging to the town were properly cared for by the selectmen. 1862. March 10th, The treasu
George M. Fletcher (search for this): chapter 14
power to make such arrangements as may be necessary for the reception of the dead and wounded of the Chelsea volunteers from the late engagement at Yorktown, Va. May 26th,— Resolved, In convention of the city council, that his honor the mayor be authorized to pledge in behalf of the city, to the volunteers who may enlist under the present call for troops, the same aid to families as is now paid under the State-aid law. The committee on police, and Messrs. Bailey, Slade, Pigott, and Fletcher of the common council were appointed with full powers to aid the Rifle Corps, or any other military organization which may answer the present call for troops. May 29th, Alderman Lothrop from the joint committee to arrange for the reception of the bodies of those members of the Chelsea volunteers who were killed in the engagement near Yorktown, Va., made a detailed report of the engagement in which the men were killed. It appeared that Mayor Fay of Chelsea was at Washington when informatio
William O. Haskell (search for this): chapter 14
C. Fitz, mayor; Albert Bisbee, Rufus Trussell, James B. Forsyth, John H. Osgood, Maurice M. Pigott, Eben W. Lothrop, Joseph Everdean, Samuel W. Mason, aldermen. In 1865, Eustace C. Fitz, mayor; Albert Bisbee, Elisha H. Ryder, Jesse Gould, William O. Haskell, Eben W. Lothrop, Maurice M. Pigott, Joseph Everdean, Samuel W. Mason, aldermen. The city-clerk and city-treasurer during all these years was Samuel Bassett. 1861. The first meeting of the city council to act upon matters relating to asurer was authorized to borrow fifty thousand dollars to pay said bounties, which, November 20th, was increased to sixty-three thousand dollars. 1863. June 11th, Messrs. Hadaway and Lothrop of the board of aldermen and the president, and Messrs. Haskell, Slocum, and Mason of the common council were appointed to make arrangements for the reception of Company H, Forty-third Regiment, upon their return from Newbern, North Carolina, and Company H, 50th Regiment, upon their return from New Orlea
Lemuel M. Standish (search for this): chapter 14
Lincoln, Jr., mayor; Thomas C. Amory, Jr., Silas Peirce, Samuel R. Spinney, Joseph L. Henshaw, Joseph F. Paul, Sylvanus L. Denio, Moses Clark, Robert Marsh, Lemuel M. Standish, John S. Tyler, Hiram A. Stevens, aldermen. In 1864, Frederick W. Lincoln, Jr., mayor; George W. Messenger, Otis Norcross, Lemuel M. Standish, Sylvanus A. Lemuel M. Standish, Sylvanus A. Denio, Robert Marsh, Hiram A. Stevens, George W. Warren, Nathaniel C. Nash, William W. Clapp, Jr., George W. Sprague, Daniel Davies, Charles F. Dana, aldermen. In 1865, Frederick W. Lincoln, Jr., mayor; George W. Messenger, Lemuel M. Standish, Robert Marsh, Sylvanus A. Denio, John S. Tyler, Nathaniel C. Nash, William W. Clapp, JrLemuel M. Standish, Robert Marsh, Sylvanus A. Denio, John S. Tyler, Nathaniel C. Nash, William W. Clapp, Jr., George W. Sprague, Daniel Davies, Edward F. Porter, Thomas Gaffield, aldermen. The city-clerk during all these years was Samuel F. McCleary. The city-treasurer during the same period was Frederick W. Tracy. The first action taken by the city in relation to the war was on the 15th of April, when the following preamble and
Samuel Hatch (search for this): chapter 14
as a city, February 23, 1822. Population in 1860, 177,818; in 1865, 192,324. Valuation in 1860, $312,000,000; in 1865, $378,303,357. The city officers in 1861 were Joseph M. Wightman, mayor; Jonathan Preston, Thomas P. Rich, Silas Peirce, Samuel Hatch, Thomas C. Coffin, Jr., James L. Hanson, Samuel R. Spinney, Nehemiah Gibson, G. Washington Parmenter, Moses Clark, John F. Pray, Elisha T. Wilson, aldermen. In 1862, Joseph M. Wightman, mayor; Thomas P. Rich, Thomas C. Amory, Jr., James L. Ha and to attend to other matters in relation to the volunteers that may come before the city council. The order was amended in the council, so that the expense should not exceed ten thousand dollars, and Messrs. Edmunds, Tyler, Child, Tucker, and Hatch of the council were joined. February 22d, By a previous vote of the city the government with a large assemblage of the people met in Faneuil Hall. Prayer was made by Rev. George W. Blagden, D. D., and Washington's Farewell Address was read by G
Washington (search for this): chapter 14
. April 17th, A special meeting of the city council was held, by order of Eustace C. Fitz, mayor, who announced in fitting terms the death of President Lincoln by the hand of an assassin. The following preamble and resolutions were then adopted:— Whereas God in his inscrutable providence has suffered the hand of the assassin to snatch away from us the beloved Chief Magistrate of the nation, it is therefore by the corporation of the city of Chelsea— Resolved, That since the days of Washington no hero or statesman has held so high a place in our respect and affection as he who for four stormy years has guided our ship of State through unknown and troubled waters and over hidden shoals. Resolved, That only hearts suffering together as we now suffer can offer to each other any sympathy; and our only consolation is an unwavering trust in the wisdom of Him whose hand is guiding this Republic to its destiny. Resolved, That while we are bowed down with inexpressible grief at thi
William Carpenter (search for this): chapter 14
ashington's Farewell Address was read by George S. Hillard, Esq. March 3d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow twenty thousand dollars for the payment of State aid. March 31st, Twenty thousand dollars additional were ordered to be borrowed for the same object. On the 7th of April the City-Relief Committee for the payment of State aid to soldiers' families was organized as follows: Aldermen Thomas C. Amory, Otis Norcross, Francis Richards, Joseph F. Faul; councilmen Joseph Buckley, William Carpenter, John S. Pear, Sumner Crosby, F. H. Sprague; Charles J. McCarthy, paymaster; Timothy R. Page, relief clerk. June 23d, A vote of thanks was passed to Colonel Thomas Cass and the Ninth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers for a present to the city of Boston of a Rebel flag, taken at the battle of Hanover Court House, Va., on the 27th ultimo. June 30th, A communication was received from Mayor Wightman recommending that a lot in Mount Hope Cemetery be set apart for the burial of soldiers; w
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