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Theodore A. Dodge (search for this): chapter 2.32
s. From Van Wert, McPherson had hastened on, with Dodge's corps in the lead. Dodge never said much in advanDodge never said much in advance of what he proposed to do, but he was a most vigorous commander and inspired the men who served under him wimatic, and active, extended and thoroughly protected Dodge's left at Dallas. Meanwhile, John A. Logan, commandready for battle-and was veering off to the right of Dodge. On Logan's right, clearing the way, and, like thcompanied with energetic and persistent activity. Dodge, as he left him, was moving along in a column, and tght beyond the crossroads at Dallas. Logan's and Dodge's advance, substantially two heavy skirmish lines ae mowed down by the hundred. The Sixteenth Corps (Dodge's) had also a considerable part in this battle. Walon only, quite up to the well-prepared barricades of Dodge. This assault, though most desperate and determin had the effect, as Hardee intended, namely, to keep Dodge and Davis in place and prevent them from reinforcing
F. W. Gilbreth (search for this): chapter 2.32
ng in the forest, faint fires here and there revealing men wounded, armless, legless, or eyeless; some with heads bound up with cotton strips, some standing and walking nervously around, some sitting with bended forms, and some prone upon the earth — who can picture itt A few men, in despair, had resorted to drink for relief. The sad sounds from those in pain were mingled with the oaths of the drunken and the more heartless. I could not leave the place, for Colonel C. H. Howard and Captain Gilbreth, aids, and other officers were coming and going to carry out necessary measures to rectify our lines and to be ready for a counter attack of the Confederates, almost sure to be made at dawn. So, for once, painfully hurt myself, I remained there from 8 P. M. to participate in that distress till about one o'clock the next morning. That night will always be a sort of nightmare to me. I think no perdition here or hereafter can be worse. Is it not an argument in favor of every possibl
s promptly obeyed. The men sprang forward and made charges and a vigorous assault. I found Johnston's front covered by strong intrenchments. A drawing back of the trenches like a traverse had deceived us. Johnston had forestalled us, and was on hand fully prepared. In the first desperate charge, Hazen's brigade was in front. R. W. Johnson's division was in echelon with Wood's, somewhat to its left. Scribner's brigade was in that front. The plan had been, though not carried out, that McLean's brigade of Schofield's command, which was the intended support on our right, should show itself clearly on open ground, attract the attention of the enemy to that part of the line, while Wood and Johnson moved upon what was supposed to be the extreme right of the Confederates' position. In this conflict Wood, the division commander, during this gloomy day met with a loss similar to mine. An officer, Major J. B. Hampson, One Hundred and Sixty-fourth Ohio, aid to General Wood, to whom he
William J. Hardee (search for this): chapter 2.32
rd until he had cleared his entire front up to Hardee's works. From that time on there was no peacein the face of an active and energetic enemy. Hardee was pressing his lines constantly, probably inorts of Walker and Cheatham had the effect, as Hardee intended, namely, to keep Dodge and Davis in pmade. On the 30th, shortly before midnight, Hardee made a moderate demonstration against our linets that Johnston had ridden from Marietta with Hardee and Polk till he reached Pine Mountain (Pine Tpied or weakly held. This was the position of Hardee on the morning of June 17th. It was formed by a dropping back of Hardee's men after being relieved from their place held the previous day. They hwas feeling forward for the new right flank of Hardee. Soon the valley of Mud Creek was reached, gradually toward the southeast, so as to face Hardee's refused lines, was coming upon the Confederaeek, above described, with the forcing back of Hardee's flank, the situation was dangerous for Johns[10 more...]
John A. Logan (search for this): chapter 2.32
horoughly protected Dodge's left at Dallas. Meanwhile, John A. Logan, commanding the Fifteenth Corps, had taken on the inspifor battle-and was veering off to the right of Dodge. On Logan's right, clearing the way, and, like the cavalry opposite, ch attention as possible, was Garrard's cavalry command. Logan was intensely active on the approach of battle. His habitu was moving along in a column, and the cavalry, assisted by Logan's artillery, were noisily driving in the enemy's light troos far off to the right beyond the crossroads at Dallas. Logan's and Dodge's advance, substantially two heavy skirmish lile the battle of Pickett's Mill was fiercely going on, both Logan and Bate kept up between them artillery firing and skirmish the most part; those in front of Oosterhaus's division (of Logan) gathered under shelter of a deep ravine, and then rushed e Dodge and Davis in place and prevent them from reinforcing Logan. Within an hour and a half the attack upon the whole rig
cross the open ground to the shelter of the bare hill above referred to; there they lay for a time under its protection. They were well formed in two lineswhile Cockerell's battery and another from Hooker's for over an hour were storming the batteries of the enemy and gradually advancing their guns. Here it was that Cockerell tCockerell took advantage of the bare hilltop as a natural breastwork. Unlimbering out of sight, he opened his fire, with only the muzzles of the guns exposed. His keen perception of this advantage saved his men, while the other battery, exposing itself fully on the crest, lost heavily. The guns opposite Cockerell were silenced; then theCockerell were silenced; then the deployment of our infantry was continued. My own corps (the Fourth) as well as the Twentieth (Hooker's) were occupied during this forward swing. Having left their Pine Top lines early in the morning of the 17th, they marched at first substantially abreast. Hooker, having the right, sped over the abandoned intrenchments of the e
G. S. Palmer (search for this): chapter 2.32
s, was coming upon the Confederates, who were already in place, as we have seen, behind Mud Creek, and strongly posted. I did the same on Hooker's left flank. Palmer's corps (the Fourteenth) came up also on my left as soon as there was room. Thus Thomas with the Third Corps worked forward with his left touching the Ackworth Rd nurses. While securing these partial successes I saw, near my right, the most remarkable feat performed by any troops during the campaign. Baird's division (Palmer's corps), in a comparatively open field, put forth a heavy skirmish line, which continued such a rapid fire of rifles as to keep down a corresponding welldefendedhe Chattahoochee. Meanwhile, early on June 18th our batteries were put under cover on the hills in front of Hardee's salient angle. This angle was in front of Palmer's and my corps, so that our guns, which we had located the preceding day, could play with an enfilading fire upon the Confederate works. After some cannonading,
J. B. Hampson (search for this): chapter 2.32
igade was in that front. The plan had been, though not carried out, that McLean's brigade of Schofield's command, which was the intended support on our right, should show itself clearly on open ground, attract the attention of the enemy to that part of the line, while Wood and Johnson moved upon what was supposed to be the extreme right of the Confederates' position. In this conflict Wood, the division commander, during this gloomy day met with a loss similar to mine. An officer, Major J. B. Hampson, One Hundred and Sixty-fourth Ohio, aid to General Wood, to whom he was personally greatly attached, was struck in his left shoulder by a musket ball, which broke the spine and ended his life in a few hours. He was a general favorite, and his death produced unfeigned sadness among his comrades. Wood had always seemed to me masterful of himself and others who came in contact with him; he had a large experience in such battles as Stone River and Chickamauga. I was therefore unprep
Jefferson C. Davis (search for this): chapter 2.32
marching at the time from the Far West, had not yet joined him. But Davis's division of the Fourteenth Corps (about 5,000 men) was sent back g May 25th, while Thomas was assailing Hood at New Hope Church, Jeff. C. Davis, prompt, systematic, and active, extended and thoroughly proteceral movement to the left, Sherman had ordered McPherson to relieve Davis and send him back to Thomas, and McPherson was preparing to do so ad repulsed. The other Confederate division (Cheatham's) opposite Davis simply strengthened its skirmish line and pushed it forward briskly and persistently in front of Davis's gallant men, resulting, of course, in some losses on both sides. These vigorous efforts of Walker and atham had the effect, as Hardee intended, namely, to keep Dodge and Davis in place and prevent them from reinforcing Logan. Within an hourooker, Schofield, and myself. In this he was still assisted by Jeff. C. Davis's division. Thomas and Schofield were then free for the leftwa
en, while the picks and shovels behind Baird's skirmishers fairly flew, till a good set of works was made but 300 or 400 yards distant from the enemy's and parallel to it. After the action at Mud Creek, above described, with the forcing back of Hardee's flank, the situation was dangerous for Johnston. He, however, had fortified, with his usual foresight, another new defensive position nearer to Marietta, and work was going on in that quarter while the battle of the 17th was raging. Colonel Prestman, Johnston's military chief of engineers, had traced the proposed intrenchments, which were destined for the last stand of the Confederates before the abandonment of Marietta; it was their last strong defense north of the Chattahoochee. Meanwhile, early on June 18th our batteries were put under cover on the hills in front of Hardee's salient angle. This angle was in front of Palmer's and my corps, so that our guns, which we had located the preceding day, could play with an enfiladin
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