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George H. Thomas (search for this): chapter 2.32
them steadily back. During May 25th, while Thomas was assailing Hood at New Hope Church, Jeff. CcPherson to relieve Davis and send him back to Thomas, and McPherson was preparing to do so and to c still assisted by Jeff. C. Davis's division. Thomas and Schofield were then free for the leftward ng on the lead himself with Baird's division. Thomas's army in this effort gained ground eastward ad went beyond us all near to Bush Mountain. Thomas, after another leftward effort, was next in pl This would have been done by me, except that Thomas had instructed me to use artillery ammunition t in following up Hardee's backward movement. Thomas and Schofield, now in the right wing of our arso on my left as soon as there was room. Thus Thomas with the Third Corps worked forward with his l prepared. I was much annoyed, and as soon as Thomas and Sherman heard of the break they were. also worried. I telegraphed Thomas that I would recover that Bald Knob on the morrow without fail. I [4 more...]
Joseph Hooker (search for this): chapter 2.32
orn fight at New Hope Church on May 25, 1864. Hooker's corps, as we have seen, supported by the grering their resting days and in the night after Hooker's bold charges to make these lines next to imp1, 1864, the diligent McPherson fully relieved Hooker's corps and my own remaining divisions, and spntythird Corps promptly marched away eastward; Hooker followed and supported him as far as the Burnon learned of the extension of Schofield's and Hooker's commands, he saw that his old position, thatand Hooker's formed a part, was near Pine Top. Hooker's men had carried some Confederate works afterineswhile Cockerell's battery and another from Hooker's for over an hour were storming the batteriesn corps (the Fourth) as well as the Twentieth (Hooker's) were occupied during this forward swing. H they marched at first substantially abreast. Hooker, having the right, sped over the abandoned intCreek, and strongly posted. I did the same on Hooker's left flank. Palmer's corps (the Fourteent[2 more...]
only trending to the Confederate rear. Wood's men were badly repulsed; he had in a few minutes over 800 killed. While this attack was going on, Newton's and Stanley's divisions of my corps near New Hope Church were attempting to divert attention by a strong demonstration, but the Confederates there behind their barricades didm his right, he would have done a wise act, and! (Sherman) was compelled to presume that such was his object. On the afternoon of the 20th, Kirby's brigade of Stanley's division was holding Bald Knob, a prominent knoll in our front. The Confederates, using artillery and plenty of riflemen, suddenly, just about sundown, made aat Bald Knob on the morrow without fail. I ordered General Wood on the right of the Knob to have his left brigade (Nodine's) ready under arms before sunrise, and Stanley to have Kirby's brigade there in front and to the left of the Knob also under arms and prepared to make an assault. One of Wood's artillery officers spent the ni
Frank Askew (search for this): chapter 2.32
er standing behind Nodine's line not far from me. I mistook him for Colonel Nodine; I called him to me, and as soon as he was near enough to hear my voice amid the roar and rattle of the conflict, I said: Colonel, can't you now rush your men forward and seize that Bald Knob He answered: Yes, sir, I can. I then said: Go ahead! He sounded the advance and all the men of the Fifteenth Ohio Infantry sprang forward, and, at a run, within fifteen minutes had crowned the knoll. It was Colonel Frank Askew, and he had done with 200 men what I had intended Nodine to do with his entire brigade. Leaving orders for Nodine and Kirby to hurry up their brigades, I mounted and, followed by McDonald and Sladen, galloped to the front and stayed there with the gallant Fifteenth Ohio men till the reinforcements with shovels and picks had joined them. The suddenness of our charge and the quickness of our riflemen cleared the Bald Knob and restored the continuity of Sherman's front. The concentr
Thomas John Wood (search for this): chapter 2.32
e plan of our leader, one division of my corps, Wood's, and one of the Fourteenth, R. W. Johnson's, r; while R. W. Johnson's division passed beyond Wood's and came up near his left for support. This was far beyond Schofield's left. Wood touched a large clearing, turned to the southeast, and moved es. Pushing quickly through the undergrowth, Wood rectified his formation. Coming to me about 5.. R. W. Johnson's division was in echelon with Wood's, somewhat to its left. Scribner's brigade wathe Confederates' position. In this conflict Wood, the division commander, during this gloomy daysuccess. But, while Hazen and the remainder of Wood's division were gaining ground, Johnson's divisivision completely uncovered, and, worse still, Wood was now brought between a front and flank fire.Knob on the morrow without fail. I ordered General Wood on the right of the Knob to have his left br arms and prepared to make an assault. One of Wood's artillery officers spent the night in putting[9 more...]
where they were mowed down by the hundred. The Sixteenth Corps (Dodge's) had also a considerable part in this battle. Walker's Confederate division had found its way at first, with the design of a demonstration only, quite up to the well-preparedsistently in front of Davis's gallant men, resulting, of course, in some losses on both sides. These vigorous efforts of Walker and Cheatham had the effect, as Hardee intended, namely, to keep Dodge and Davis in place and prevent them from reinforci battle of Dallas, whether by General Johnston's orders or not, was a correspondingly heavy assault of Bate's and part of Walker's divisions, supported by the rest of Walker's and the whole of Cheatham's, against Sherman's right flank. There was a Walker's and the whole of Cheatham's, against Sherman's right flank. There was a decided repulse in each case. The scales were thus evenly balanced. After the failure of Hardee on the afternoon of May 28th, he withdrew within his own intrenchments, and, besides the skirmish firing which was almost incessant during those days,
ail. I ordered General Wood on the right of the Knob to have his left brigade (Nodine's) ready under arms before sunrise, and Stanley to have Kirby's brigade there i men in the action when it came on. When Kirby's skirmishers were well out, and Nodine's also, and our battery very active filling the air over the Knob with bursting shells, I saw an officer standing behind Nodine's line not far from me. I mistook him for Colonel Nodine; I called him to me, and as soon as he was near enough to hColonel Nodine; I called him to me, and as soon as he was near enough to hear my voice amid the roar and rattle of the conflict, I said: Colonel, can't you now rush your men forward and seize that Bald Knob He answered: Yes, sir, I can. . It was Colonel Frank Askew, and he had done with 200 men what I had intended Nodine to do with his entire brigade. Leaving orders for Nodine and Kirby to hurry upNodine and Kirby to hurry up their brigades, I mounted and, followed by McDonald and Sladen, galloped to the front and stayed there with the gallant Fifteenth Ohio men till the reinforcements wi
Harry M. Stinson (search for this): chapter 2.32
halt and the direct preparation for a charge, I was standing in the edge of a wood, and with my glass following along the lines of Johnston, to see where the batteries were located and to ascertain if we had reached his limits. My aid, Captain Harry M. Stinson, stepped boldly into the opening. He had a new field glass, and here was an excellent opportunity to try it. I had warned him and the other officers of my staff against the danger of exposure, for we were not more than 700 yards from the hostile intrenchments. Stinson had hardly raised his glass to his forehead when a bullet struck him. He fell to the ground upon his face, and as I turned toward him I saw that there was a bullet hole through the back of his coat. The missile had penetrated his lungs and made its way entirely through his body. I thought at first that my brave young friend was dead, and intense grief seized my heart, for Harry was much beloved. After a few minutes, however, by means of some stimulant, h
Jacob D. Cox (search for this): chapter 2.32
rmed by a dropping back of Hardee's men after being relieved from their place held the previous day. They had fallen back some three miles to cross Muddy Run. Our observation of what was going on was so close that no time was lost in following up Hardee's backward movement. Thomas and Schofield, now in the right wing of our army, early in the morning of the 17th went straight forward, skirmishing with Jackson's cavalry and driving it before them, until they reached the Marietta Crossroads. Cox (of Schofield's), with his division, was feeling forward for the new right flank of Hardee. Soon the valley of Mud Creek was reached, and the Confederate batteries on the bluff were exposed to full view. Schofield's men made a rapid rush across the open ground to the shelter of the bare hill above referred to; there they lay for a time under its protection. They were well formed in two lineswhile Cockerell's battery and another from Hooker's for over an hour were storming the batteries o
Charles Henry Howard (search for this): chapter 2.32
ill. That opening in the forest, faint fires here and there revealing men wounded, armless, legless, or eyeless; some with heads bound up with cotton strips, some standing and walking nervously around, some sitting with bended forms, and some prone upon the earth — who can picture itt A few men, in despair, had resorted to drink for relief. The sad sounds from those in pain were mingled with the oaths of the drunken and the more heartless. I could not leave the place, for Colonel C. H. Howard and Captain Gilbreth, aids, and other officers were coming and going to carry out necessary measures to rectify our lines and to be ready for a counter attack of the Confederates, almost sure to be made at dawn. So, for once, painfully hurt myself, I remained there from 8 P. M. to participate in that distress till about one o'clock the next morning. That night will always be a sort of nightmare to me. I think no perdition here or hereafter can be worse. Is it not an argument in favor
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