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l, of Massachusetts, both members of the House of Representatives. As far as my judgment goes, I should be well satisfied with either, though I am more intimate with Mr. Boutwell, and consider him the superior man of the two. At the same time, Mr. Hooper is a person of the most solid character and capacity, and of very great experience in commercial affairs. Whether any other members of the present cabinet will retire is at this time only a matter of speculation. I have supposed that Mr. Welles would not be likely to remain, and also that Mr. Usher's transfer to some other position of usefulness was probable. But these things are still without any sure indication, and I should not be surprised if all the present cabinet should be retained with the exception of Mr. Fessenden. I especially regard it as certain that Mr. Stanton will continue in the War Department, and Governor Denison in the General Post-Office. Mr. Speed will also no doubt remain as Attorney-General. There has
Peter Hains (search for this): chapter 22
ks from now. About brevets for your officers, I suppose the fact is just the same as with everybody else, Mr. Stanton has been too busy to sign the papers. There is a pile of them about two feet high now lying upon his table, and I presume, though I don't know, that yours are in with the rest. I propose to show your letter to General Grant, but to no one else. Rawlins has gone to Galena with his wife. General Grant has gone to Albany to celebrate the Fourth. General Halleck is here on his way to San Francisco. Slocum is assigned to command Mississippi, and I suppose Steedman will have Georgia. A heap of generals will be mustered out very soon, but you are not in the lot. Poe is here getting up his engineer's work from Sherman's campaigns, but I haven't seen him. Ulffers is with him. He came to see me the other day. Peter Hains got his leave of absence about three weeks since to take command of a New Jersey regiment, so that he is a colonel in spite of everything.
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 22
lson cavalry campaign in Alabama and Georgia Grant's final campaign collapse of Confederacy Dan any chance of Smith's being employed till General Grant desires to employ him. Franklin is not A. This was done on the recommendation of General Grant, or rather with his hearty concurrence, fond was at hand! The final and greatest of all Grant's turning movements had been well started. Thdent had made it impracticable for him to join Grant in time to be present at the surrender. Event had received, and directed Dana to proceed to Grant's headquarters and gather up such details as might appear to be of interest; but Grant was not one to tarry long on the scene of his chief glory.w whether this report has been withheld by General Grant, or has otherwise failed to reach the adjuably more cheerfully than you went up. But General Grant will take care of you in one way or anotheRawlins has gone to Galena with his wife. General Grant has gone to Albany to celebrate the Fourth[16 more...]
the State of New York. The inducements were complete control of all military appointments among the troops of that State, the opportunity of great political usefulness, and an amount of pay on which I could live. But Mr. Stanton would not consent, and so I shall stay here for the present. But as soon as the war is so far over that I can properly leave, I shall attend to my own affairs. ... From City Point I have no news. Joe Bowers was here a fortnight since, looking as well as ever. Dunn was up on Monday with a bundle of despatches for the secretary. He said all were well. Comstock accompanied Butler to Fort Fisher. That affair makes unpleasant feeling between army and navy. What is the real truth I don't know. W. F. Smith has gone to New Orleans as the head of a board to investigate the Quartermaster's Department there, and everything else. We have nothing of moment from Savannah since its surrender. Of course, Sherrman's army will not be idle there. The Rebels a
Jacob Thompson (search for this): chapter 22
d Dana to proceed to Grant's headquarters and gather up such details as might appear to be of interest; but Grant was not one to tarry long on the scene of his chief glory. He was as glad as the lowest private in the ranks that the war was ended, and made haste to leave the field. Dana joined him en route, and accompanied him to Washington, where they arrived on April 13, 1865. The next day Dana had an interesting interview with Lincoln at the White House, in regard to the arrest of Jacob Thompson, a Confederate commissioner, who was trying to make his way from Canada through Maine to Europe. Stanton thought he ought to be caught, but sent Dana to refer the matter to the President. As soon as the latter understood the question to be answered, he said, No, I rather think not. When you have got an elephant by the hind leg, and he is trying to run away, it's best to let him run! Dana, Recollections of the Civil War. D. Appleton & Co. That night, while at the play, Lincoln rece
come down with the general on Sunday? The general at first proposed to put either Sheridan or Meade in charge of the campaign in the Valley; next he sent word to leave Hunter in command if he had 14th he wrote to me: I don't believe General Grant is coming to Washington. I judge that Meade is likely to be relieved and Hancock to be put in his place, but this is a mere private impressiMarch, 1865, with an overwhelming superiority of force. Sheridan's victorious army had rejoined Meade south of the James. Schofield's corps from the West had been directed towards the heart of Northich took him to Fort Monroe, Dana returned to Washington in time to witness the great review of Meade's and Sherman's armies, and of Sheridan's cavalry. This took place on May 23d and 24th, and on ucky, and the Northern States between the mountains and the Mississippi; Sherman, the South; and Meade, the Atlantic coast from the southern boundary of South Carolina to Canada, with a district comm
Benjamin Franklin Butler (search for this): chapter 22
esires to employ him. Franklin is not likely to have a command anywhere. ... Don't believe any of the reports about approaching changes in the cabinet. If Mr. Stanton is to be Chief-Justice, I don't know it; and I do know that neither General Butler nor General Banks is to be Secretary of War. As is well known, the Army of the Potomac and the forces under Sheridan maintained a strictly defensive attitude in Virginia during the entire fall and winter of 1864-65, while Sherman, without attend to my own affairs. ... From City Point I have no news. Joe Bowers was here a fortnight since, looking as well as ever. Dunn was up on Monday with a bundle of despatches for the secretary. He said all were well. Comstock accompanied Butler to Fort Fisher. That affair makes unpleasant feeling between army and navy. What is the real truth I don't know. W. F. Smith has gone to New Orleans as the head of a board to investigate the Quartermaster's Department there, and everything e
r Department, and largely carried into effect under Dana's direction, the conspiracy was developed, and the conspirators were arrested and brought to trial. Dana had gathered many letters and much information showing the details of the conspiracy, and on May 18th gave his testimony in the case. Shortly afterwards private business took him to Chicago, whence he was recalled to Washington to identify the key of the Confederate secret cipher, which he had found at Richmond in the office of Mr. Benjamin, the Confederate Secretary of State. Having completed this duty, the Secretary of War sent him to Fort Monroe to see that the commanding officer should take every necessary precaution to prevent the suicide or the escape of the prisoners of state about to be confined at that place; and it was under this specific injunction that Dana wrote the order of May 22, 1865, authorizing and directing General Miles to place manacles and fetters upon the hands and feet of both Jefferson Davis and
James Harrison Wilson (search for this): chapter 22
of War Department Services in Washington Spencer carbines Sheridan's Valley campaign Dana visits Sheridan defensive attitude of army in Virginia Sherman's march to the sea Nashville campaign dispersion of Hood's army letters to Wilson cavalry campaign in Alabama and Georgia Grant's final campaign collapse of Confederacy Dana goes to the front assassination of Lincoln arrest and trial of conspirators capture and confinement of Jefferson Davis visits Fort Monroe events rom the West had been directed towards the heart of North Carolina. Fort Fisher had fallen. Thomas had annihilated Hood. Sherman was marching northward, leaving a wide swath of ruin and desolation behind him. Canby was now sure of Mobile, while Wilson with his cavalrymen was marching through the heart of the Confederacy, destroying its last arsenals, armories, factories, and depots, and breaking up its last line of transportation. The end was at hand! The final and greatest of all Grant's tu
ot far distant... Rawlins was looking very well when I saw him last, a month ago. Shortly after the close of the Nashville campaign it was decided to send Schofield's army corps from Tennessee to the Chesapeake Bay to assist in the closing operations in the Eastern theatre; and, as Dana had special charge of railroad transpode, and take any chances for nomination and election to the Presidency which may belong to Mr. Lincoln's Secretary of State .... I suppose that the advance of Schofield's corps is here by this time, although it has not yet been reported to me. During the cavalry campaign through Alabama and Georgia, in March and April, 1865,gan his own forward movement, late in March, 1865, with an overwhelming superiority of force. Sheridan's victorious army had rejoined Meade south of the James. Schofield's corps from the West had been directed towards the heart of North Carolina. Fort Fisher had fallen. Thomas had annihilated Hood. Sherman was marching northwar
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