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Margaret Fuller (search for this): chapter 6
ccess must follow in their train. April. Miss Fuller left town this week for Groton, where she iflag still flying. The school in which Margaret Fuller was to teach at Providence was the Green preach in the two Unitarian churches. Margaret Fuller was ill for a time after reaching Provide or made calls till ten; this was her day. Fuller Mss. i. 619. Her task as to mere instruction waling her own experience. The year after Margaret Fuller left Providence, we find her writing to h fortunately Miss Jacobs had ready tact, if Miss Fuller had not. Oh, yes! she said, I do not doubtsaid in a sermon that he once went to see Margaret Fuller when she had been teaching in Providence he school two or three months. They say, O Miss Fuller, we did not know, till we came to you, how ttended last week, somewhat to the horror of Mr. Fuller, the Whig Caucus here, and heard Tristam Burhardships and privations of such a situation. Fuller Mss. i. 635. When she wrote, years after, the [11 more...]
Elizabeth P. Peabody (search for this): chapter 6
ing ways of literature and philosophy which she would have much preferred. An opening offered itself in the school of Mr. A. B. Alcott, in Boston, where Miss Elizabeth P. Peabody had been previously employed. Mr. Alcott's unpublished diary gives the successive steps in the negotiation and enables me to present the beginning and ton of some force of character and a good deal of ambition, who perhaps showed both qualities in inviting Miss Fuller to be his assistant. She wrote of him to Miss Peabody: Mr. Fuller is as unlike as possible to Mr. Alcott. He has neither his poetic beauty nor his practical defects. Ms. His offer to her, as stated in Mr. Alsins that flesh is heir to, cannot long continue. After this came a period of unusual health, during which she wrote in great exhilaration to her friends. To Miss Peabody, for instance (July 8, 1837), she exulted in the glow of returning health, and then gave this account of the school:-- As to the school, . .. I believe I
Theodore Parker (search for this): chapter 6
ional brief visits from Providence to Boston, and it may be well to insert a passage from one of her letters to Mr. Emerson, in which she gives a glimpse of the gay world of that city forty-seven years ago. The picture of Daniel Webster and Theodore Parker moving among the jeunesse doree in a ball-room seems like one of the far-fetched improbabilities of an historical novel. The Gigman allusion is to Carlyle's afterwards hackneyed phrase about the respectability that keeps a gig. It is possib to represent pages if not nobles. Signor Figaro was there also in propria [persona] la et al. And Daniel the Great, not, however, when I saw him, engaged in an operation peculiarly favorable to his style of beauty, to wit, eating oysters. Theodore Parker was there, and introduced to me. I had some pleasant talk with him, but before I could get to Spinoza, somebody seized on me and carried me off to quite another S,--to supper. On the whole, it all pleased my eye; my fashionable fellow-crea
M. F. Clearly (search for this): chapter 6
Peabody's place in my school. December 17th. I have seen M. F., who, besides giving instruction in the languages, will report The conversations on the Gospels as they proceed. 1837, January 8th. I resume the Conversations, which have been suspended since last July. Subject, The sermon on the Mount, for a beginning. Miss F. reports them; if she succeeds in seizing their form and spirit, we may add a third to the two published volumes. 1837, 12th January. This evening with M. F. Clearly a person given to the boldest speculations, and of liberal and varied acquirements. Not wanting in imaginary power, she strikes me as having the rarest good sense and discretion:--qualities so essential to success in any sphere, and especially to a woman ambitious of literary distinction, and relying solely on native work. She adopts the spiritual philosophy, and has the subtlest perceptions of its necessities and bearings. February 8th. Miss F. succeeds, after some trial, in repor
N. P. Willis (search for this): chapter 6
possible to Mr. Alcott. He has neither his poetic beauty nor his practical defects. Ms. His offer to her, as stated in Mr. Alcott's diary, was a liberal one for those days, and I am assured by Miss Jacobs, who followed Miss Fuller in the school, that the thousand dollars were undoubtedly paid, though Horace Greeley, in his Recollections, states the contrary. Mr. Fuller taught the school for a few years only, then went to New York and became connected with the New York Mirror, edited by N. P. Willis and George P. Morris. This he abandoned after a time, being tired, as he said, of supporting two poets, and was afterwards editor of the London Cosmopolitan. In addition to his bold choice of an assistant, he invoked the rising prestige of Ralph Waldo Emerson, inviting him to give an address at the dedication of the Academy (Saturday, June 10, 1837), and suggesting to him, he being still in the ministry, to bring sermons and preach in the two Unitarian churches. Margaret Fuller was i
ither his poetic beauty nor his practical defects. Ms. His offer to her, as stated in Mr. Alcott's diary, was a liberal one for those days, and I am assured by Miss Jacobs, who followed Miss Fuller in the school, that the thousand dollars were undoubtedly paid, though Horace Greeley, in his Recollections, states the contrary. Mr.n her some of those criticisms from which educated men are not exempt, and which are quite sure to visit highly-educated women. One lady said to her successor, Miss Jacobs, soon after her arrival at the school: Miss Fuller says she thinks in German; do you believe it? It was a discourteous question to a new-comer, who would naturally wish to keep clear of the feuds and the claims of her predecessor; but fortunately Miss Jacobs had ready tact, if Miss Fuller had not. Oh, yes! she said, I do not doubt it; I myself dream in Cherokee; which left her assailant discomfited. James Freeman Clarke has lately said in a sermon that he once went to see Margaret Fu
a few weeks, for recruiting her health to enter the Green Street School at Providence. Here, during the last winter, she has been engaged in teaching the French, German, and Italian languages to private classes, also Latin and French in my school. Ms. by Mr. Alcott. Her connection with Mr. Alcott's school, like the school i are quite sure to visit highly-educated women. One lady said to her successor, Miss Jacobs, soon after her arrival at the school: Miss Fuller says she thinks in German; do you believe it? It was a discourteous question to a new-comer, who would naturally wish to keep clear of the feuds and the claims of her predecessor; but forollar for quarter-hour lessons. That winter, however, as she tells him, she is too tired to take them at any price; she must rest; but she will give her younger sister lessons in German, and will teach Latin and composition to himself. This was her idea of resting, and thus she rested at Groton for the remainder of that winter.
ok at. So many fair maidens dressed as if they had stepped out of their grandmothers' picture frames, and youths with their long locks, suitable to represent pages if not nobles. Signor Figaro was there also in propria [persona] la et al. And Daniel the Great, not, however, when I saw him, engaged in an operation peculiarly favorable to his style of beauty, to wit, eating oysters. Theodore Parker was there, and introduced to me. I had some pleasant talk with him, but before I could get to Spinoza, somebody seized on me and carried me off to quite another S,--to supper. On the whole, it all pleased my eye; my fashionable fellow-creatures were very civil to me, and I went home, glad to have looked at this slide in the magic lantern also. Ms. Writing from Providence, August 14, 1837, she lays plans for her summer vacation, which is to begin with unmerciful tardiness on August 19. For her three weeks vacation she plans to visit, with her friend Caroline Sturgis, that delicious la
g meant to go, but was too weary when the hour came. I spent the early part of the evening in reading bits of Dante with him, and talking about the material sublime till half-past 9, when I went with Mrs. C. and graceful Mary. It was very pretty to look at. So many fair maidens dressed as if they had stepped out of their grandmothers' picture frames, and youths with their long locks, suitable to represent pages if not nobles. Signor Figaro was there also in propria [persona] la et al. And Daniel the Great, not, however, when I saw him, engaged in an operation peculiarly favorable to his style of beauty, to wit, eating oysters. Theodore Parker was there, and introduced to me. I had some pleasant talk with him, but before I could get to Spinoza, somebody seized on me and carried me off to quite another S,--to supper. On the whole, it all pleased my eye; my fashionable fellow-creatures were very civil to me, and I went home, glad to have looked at this slide in the magic lantern als
W. H. Channing (search for this): chapter 6
hackneyed phrase about the respectability that keeps a gig. It is possible that the entertainment may have occurred just before her actual removal to Providence. Last night I took my boldest peep into the Gigman world of Boston. I have not been to a large party before, and only seen said world in half-boots; so I thought, as it was an occasion in which I felt real interest, to wit, a fete given by Mrs. Thorndike for my beautiful Susan, I would look at it for once in satin slippers. Dr. Channing meant to go, but was too weary when the hour came. I spent the early part of the evening in reading bits of Dante with him, and talking about the material sublime till half-past 9, when I went with Mrs. C. and graceful Mary. It was very pretty to look at. So many fair maidens dressed as if they had stepped out of their grandmothers' picture frames, and youths with their long locks, suitable to represent pages if not nobles. Signor Figaro was there also in propria [persona] la et al. An
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