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Browsing named entities in a specific section of A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864.. Search the whole document.

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ll upon the north side, Sumner's Corps being upon the left of Franklin, six miles above Bottom's Bridge. This force consisted of the divisions of Generals Sedgwick and Richardson, each division having a bridge over the stream opposite its position. At two o'clock on the 31st, these troops were ordered to cross without delay, and they immediately pushed forward to the support of Gen. Heintzelman. In the meantime Naglee's brigade, reinforced by artillery under Col. Bailey and by a part of Peck's brigade, had been again forced back by overpowering numbers, and, after a gallant struggle, beyond the position in the morning of the troops commanded by Gen. Couch, which was far in Naglee's rear, and at this moment it was learned that a heavy column of Confederates was marching toward Fair Oaks station. This column was engaged by Gen. Couch with a portion of his division of Keyes's corps, but he was obliged to fall back one half mile; here learning of Sumner's approach, he at once formed
Charles H. French (search for this): chapter 5
its on the left, at Seven Pines, Hooker bivouacked in their rear. Sedgwick remained relatively in the same position as at dark; all his artillery that could be moved was brought up, and Richardson was placed on his left to connect with Kearney. French's brigade was placed along the railroad. Howard's brigade formed a second line, and the Irish brigade, a third. How at five o'clock on the morning of June 1, 1862, Confederate skirmishers and cavalry appeared in front of Richardson and were Hooker, supported by Birney's brigade, attacking from the left with two regiments, pushed the Confederates before him, and a final charge being ordered, they fled, abandoning their arms; and finally how a bayonet charge from the right, led by Gen. French, completed the discomfiture of the Confederates,—are well known to the country; the result of all this being that our lines were re-established in their position of the 30th. If an opportunity presented itself of striking a decisive blow whic
st Division. Maj. Gen. H. W. Slocum, Commanding. First Brigade.—Col. A. T. A. Torbert, 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th New Jersey Volunteers. Second Brigade.—Col. J. J. Bartlett, 16th and 27th New York, 5th Maine, and 96th Pennsylvania. Third Brigade.—Brig. Gen. John Newton, 18th, 31st, and 32d New York Volunteers, and 95th Pennsylvania (Gosline Zouaves). Artillery. Platt's D, 2d United States, 6 Napoleons. Porter's A, Massachusetts, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and 2 12-pd. Howitzers. Hexamer's A, New Jersey, 4 10-pd. Parrotts, and 2 12-pd. Howitzers. Wilson's F, New York, 4 3-inch Ordnance Guns. Second Division. Maj. Gen. William F. Smith, Commanding. First Brigade.—Brig. Gen. W. S. Hancock, 5th Wisconsin, 49th Pennsylvania, 43d New York, 6th Maine. Second Brigade.—Brig. Gen. W. H. Brooks, 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, and 6th Vermont Volunteers. Third Brigade.—Brig. Gen. Davidson, 33d, 77th, 49th New York Volunteers, and 7th Maine Volunteers. Artillery. Ayre
eral troops which occupied a position on a hill east of the Mechanicsville Bridge road. We saw a crowd of Federal officers and soldiers watching from this hill the singular spectacle across the swamp. What was the significance of it, we never knew. It did not immediately result in any change of position on our part. It has been conjectured that this was a part of an ostentatious movement of troops, designed to convey the idea that Jackson was to be reinforced in the valley; while really Gen. Lee was contemplating the withdrawal of that army to augment the already large force which, drawn from the seaboard and elsewhere in Virginia, he concentrated, with Johnson's army for a nucleus, in front of Richmond. Roster. Sixth Army Corps. Maj. Gen. William B. Franklin, Commanding. In the Peninsula Campaign, 1862. First Division. Maj. Gen. H. W. Slocum, Commanding. First Brigade.—Col. A. T. A. Torbert, 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th New Jersey Volunteers. Second Brigade.—Col. J.
Jonathan Sedgwick (search for this): chapter 5
s Corps being upon the left of Franklin, six miles above Bottom's Bridge. This force consisted of the divisions of Generals Sedgwick and Richardson, each division having a bridge over the stream opposite its position. At two o'clock on the 31st,inging the force in good order within the Federal lines. At six o'clock Gen. Sumner reached Gen. Couch's position, with Sedgwick's division; before his arrival, Gen. Devens, from the centre of Couch's line, made gallant efforts to regain portions of the lost ground. The road was so muddy that only one battery of Sedgwick's division (Kirby's) could be got in position; the First Minnesota being detailed for protection of the flank, the remaining infantry of the division was formed in line with tportion of Casey's division were massed in the rifle-pits on the left, at Seven Pines, Hooker bivouacked in their rear. Sedgwick remained relatively in the same position as at dark; all his artillery that could be moved was brought up, and Richardso
Frank Howard (search for this): chapter 5
division now appeared upon the scene, but night brought cessation from further strife on this day. During the night, Kearney's, Couch's, and a portion of Casey's division were massed in the rifle-pits on the left, at Seven Pines, Hooker bivouacked in their rear. Sedgwick remained relatively in the same position as at dark; all his artillery that could be moved was brought up, and Richardson was placed on his left to connect with Kearney. French's brigade was placed along the railroad. Howard's brigade formed a second line, and the Irish brigade, a third. How at five o'clock on the morning of June 1, 1862, Confederate skirmishers and cavalry appeared in front of Richardson and were repulsed; how the Confederates, later, came on in full force, approaching rapidly in columns of attack, supported by infantry in line of battle on either side, appearing determined to crush, by this signal onslaught, the devoted troops that withstood them; how the Federal force sustained this shock
Martha Custis (search for this): chapter 5
e farther down the Chickahominy Swamp. During the next eight or nine days the advance guards reached these points, May 16, 17, 1862. The First Division of the Sixth Corps, consisting of twelve regiments of infantry, a regiment of cavalry and four batteries, one of which was the First Massachusetts, about the 17th of May was passing Whitehouse, hard by the landing which was to be our depot of supplies until the change of base. Those in the column who were familiar with the story of Martha Custis and Washington's wooing, doubtless looked with interest upon the weatherworn and decaying building; but we fancy that a livelier attraction for the mass of the boys as they moved by in column, presented itself in a unique group of children, perched upon the fence in front of the mansion; the little elves actually had red, curly hair, along with mulatto features and complexion. Here was a strange phase of physical evolution occurring amid the direful revolution of the social system which
ver. On the 25th Keyes's corps was one mile in front of Savage's Station, which is on the York River Railroad. Keyes's position was fortified. Three days later, Casey's division of the Fourth Corps moved to a line which extended through a point one half mile beyond Seven Pines, where a new line of rifle-pits was commenced and tih, was in the rear of the latter. It was the advanced and seemingly isolated situation of the Fourth that doubtless led to the Confederate attack three days after Casey's advance. Between one and two P. M., May 31, Naglee's brigade, after a spirited defence, was forced back from its position toward Seven Pines, by a division of other division now appeared upon the scene, but night brought cessation from further strife on this day. During the night, Kearney's, Couch's, and a portion of Casey's division were massed in the rifle-pits on the left, at Seven Pines, Hooker bivouacked in their rear. Sedgwick remained relatively in the same position as at dar
t direction, held the position until after dark, then, being separated by its movement from the main body, the brigade fell back, circuitously, the commander bringing the force in good order within the Federal lines. At six o'clock Gen. Sumner reached Gen. Couch's position, with Sedgwick's division; before his arrival, Gen. Devens, from the centre of Couch's line, made gallant efforts to regain portions of the lost ground. The road was so muddy that only one battery of Sedgwick's division (Kirby's) could be got in position; the First Minnesota being detailed for protection of the flank, the remaining infantry of the division was formed in line with the aforesaid battery in the centre. Now a tremendous fire was opened by the Confederates all along the line, and charges were made by them, though repulsed with heavy loss upon our side. At length Gen. Sumner ordered a charge, which was made with such vim and effectiveness that the opposing force was driven in disorder from his front.
, and, after a gallant struggle, beyond the position in the morning of the troops commanded by Gen. Couch, which was far in Naglee's rear, and at this moment it was learned that a heavy column of Confederates was marching toward Fair Oaks station. This column was engaged by Gen. Couch with a portion of his division of Keyes's corps, but he was obliged to fall back one half mile; here learning of bringing the force in good order within the Federal lines. At six o'clock Gen. Sumner reached Gen. Couch's position, with Sedgwick's division; before his arrival, Gen. Devens, from the centre of CoucCouch's line, made gallant efforts to regain portions of the lost ground. The road was so muddy that only one battery of Sedgwick's division (Kirby's) could be got in position; the First Minnesota beingne, but night brought cessation from further strife on this day. During the night, Kearney's, Couch's, and a portion of Casey's division were massed in the rifle-pits on the left, at Seven Pines,
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