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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). Search the whole document.

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Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.16
tured in the battle of Nashville. Their poems of the Mexican War were frequently quoted, and in fact were printed in nearly all the Southern anthologies of the Civil War. James Barron Hope, who had been Virginia's official poet at the Jamestown celebration and the unveiling of the Washington monument in Richmond (1858), was quartermaster and captain in the Army of Virginia, and came out of the struggle broken in fortune and in health. Albert Pike, See also Book II, Chap. VII. born in Massachusetts and author of Hymns to the gods (1839), was Confederate Commissioner to the Indians and afterwards a brigadier-general. Margaret Junkin Preston, born in Philadelphia, revealed in Beechenbrook—a poetical transcript of her experiences and impressions of the war—what the war meant to a woman who was the wife of one of the most distinguished colonels of Lee's army, the sister-in-law of Stonewall Jackson, and the friend of Lee. John R. Thompson, successor to Poe as the editor of The Southern
Moscow, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.16
e South, Randall's Battle Cry of the South, Mrs. Warfield's Chant of Defiance, Thompson's Coercion, and Hope's Oath of freedom. Among the group of Virginia poets who wrote of the early battles on Virginia soil, John R. Thompson (1822-73) and Mrs. Preston (1820-97) stand out as the most conspicuous. Of distinctly higher quality than the crude rhymes already referred to were Thompson's humorous poems on some of the early Southern victories. His On to Richmond, modelled on Southey's March to Moscow, is an exceedingly clever poem. His mastery of double and triple rhymes, his unfailing sense of the value of words, and his happy use of the refrain (the pleasant excursion to Richmond) make this poem one of the marked achievements of the period. Scarcely less successful in their brilliant satire are his Farewell to Pope, England's Neutrality, and The Devil's delight. The humour of these poems soon gave way, however, to the more heroic and tragic aspects of the war. Thompson himself wro
J. H. Morgan (search for this): chapter 2.16
Robert said, ‘My soldiers, You've nothing now to fear, For Longstreet's on the right of them, And Jackson's in the rear.’ The Fourteenth Louisiana, They charged 'em with a yell; They bagged them buck-tailed rangers And sent 'em off to hell. O Morgan crossed the river, And I went across with him; I was captured in Ohio Because I could not swim. No matter where this song was sung, or by whom, or which of its multitude of stanzas happened to be selected by the minstrel, the following verse alwawhich he exhorts the West to emulate Virginia in its struggle for freedom. Requier's Clouds in the West is followed by Flash's tribute to Zollicoffer, Ticknor's poem on Albert Sidney Johnston, Hayne's The Swamp Fox—a spirited characterization of Morgan, who seems to the poet a reincarnation of the South Carolina Revolutionary patriot Marion. Connected also with the battles of the West were Ticknor's Loyal and Little Giffen of Tennessee—the latter based on a story of real life and a striking i
W. P. Trent (search for this): chapter 2.16
ed by a careful critical judgment and good taste as to distinguish it from the hastily prepared anthologies by Southerners. Two books of similar nature are Eggleston's American War ballads and Burton E. Stevenson's Poems of American history, in both of which the poems are published in chronological order, and in Stevenson's book with the historical setting which interprets many of the individual poems. In later years selections from Southern writers by Miss Manly and Miss Clarke and Professors Trent, Kent, and Fulton, and biographical sketches by Baskervill and Link, have brought the best poems and poets within the reach of a larger circle of students and readers. The Library of Southern literature is a valuable mine of selections and biographical material. When one tries to make a general estimate of this war poetry as a whole, there are three standpoints from which it may be considered. Judged from the standpoint of absolute criticism, it affords another illustration of the
Edward Eggleston (search for this): chapter 2.16
were written My Maryland and The conquered Banner. The volume as a whole was so marked by a careful critical judgment and good taste as to distinguish it from the hastily prepared anthologies by Southerners. Two books of similar nature are Eggleston's American War ballads and Burton E. Stevenson's Poems of American history, in both of which the poems are published in chronological order, and in Stevenson's book with the historical setting which interprets many of the individual poems. In tably Ticknor's Lee, Thompson's Lee to the Rear, and the anonymous Silent March, suggest the last battles in Virginia. The dominant note of the later poetry is that of melancholy, now and then tempered by a sort of pathetic longing for peace. Eggleston tells us that the most popular poem on both sides came to be C. C. Sawyer's When This Cruel War Is Over. See Book III, Chap. II The sentiment of the poem is echoed in poems on peace by George Herbert Sass, Ticknor, Bruns, and Timrod. Very
Thaddeus Oliver (search for this): chapter 2.16
without work there is not the remotest chance for an enduring reputation, and at the same time makes the same suggestion to others who may have acquired a reverence for inspiration so called, and a contempt for the art of versification. Apart from his critical judgment Davidson shows the ability of a careful editor in weighing evidence as to the authorship of All quiet along the Potomac—a poem that all Southerners had claimed as the work of Lamar Fontaine. Now by some ascribed to Thaddeus Oliver (1826-64). Davidson publishes Fontaine's letter claiming positively the authorship, but side by side with it is one from Joel Chandler Harris, who was at that time, according to the editor, planning an edition of Southern poems, and who after much deliberation expresses the opinion that Mrs. Beers is the author of the poem. He quotes also a letter to the same effect from the editor of Harper's magazine. While he himself does not express an opinion, it is not difficult for the reader t
Margaret Junkin Preston (search for this): chapter 2.16
ons through many years of my life. Some years later Margaret J. Preston wrote to Hayne: Poetry has been only my pastime,o the Indians and afterwards a brigadier-general. Margaret Junkin Preston, born in Philadelphia, revealed in Beechenbrook—a selected from, 71 in all, the only noteworthy one being Mrs. Preston. There are thirteen poems on Stonewall Jackson, only tgraphical sketches, and bibliographies of Simms, Hayne, Mrs. Preston, Flash, and Randall, and surprisingly short ones of Ticattles on Virginia soil, John R. Thompson (1822-73) and Mrs. Preston (1820-97) stand out as the most conspicuous. Of distin both of them the finest types of Virginia gentlemen. Mrs. Preston wrote a still more beautiful tribute to Ashby, in which the tributes to the great leaders of the Confederacy. Mrs. Preston's Only a private and Mrs. Townsend's The Georgia Volunhn Williamson Palmer (1825-1906). Excellent also are Margaret J. Preston's Stonewall Jackson's grave and Under the shade of t
Joel Chandler Harris (search for this): chapter 2.16
y some ascribed to Thaddeus Oliver (1826-64). Davidson publishes Fontaine's letter claiming positively the authorship, but side by side with it is one from Joel Chandler Harris, who was at that time, according to the editor, planning an edition of Southern poems, and who after much deliberation expresses the opinion that Mrs. Beerditor of Harper's magazine. While he himself does not express an opinion, it is not difficult for the reader to be convinced by the reasoning submitted by Joel Chandler Harris. The mention of Harris suggests that in this volume he himself appears as the author of several poems which are as unlike his later writings as anything cHarris suggests that in this volume he himself appears as the author of several poems which are as unlike his later writings as anything could well be. Davidson has the credit too of publishing for the first time in this volume McCabe's Dreaming in the trenches and Christmas night of ‘62, and certain recent poems of Maurice Thompson and Sidney Lanier. He also has much to say of poems that do not relate to the war. In 1882 Francis F. Browne of Chicago carried out
Paul Hamilton Hayne (search for this): chapter 2.16
Some years later Margaret J. Preston wrote to Hayne: Poetry has been only my pastime, not the the Confederacy. Of the younger poets Paul Hamilton Hayne, Henry Timrod, and James Ryder Randall enry Timrod (1829-67), the friend of Simms and Hayne, had also definitely dedicated himself to the poems each by Randall and Ticknor, one each by Hayne, Hope, Flash, Meek, Pike, Simms, and J. R. Thoaphical sketches, and bibliographies of Simms, Hayne, Mrs. Preston, Flash, and Randall, and surprisdition of Timrod (1873), of Ticknor (1879), of Hayne (1882), he finds a much larger number of Southfer, Ticknor's poem on Albert Sidney Johnston, Hayne's The Swamp Fox—a spirited characterization ofings the rapturous joy of the victory. Paul Hamilton Hayne sang a nobler song of victory, giving tived for many years in the Far West. Paul Hamilton Hayne alone made progress after the war. WithI Fain Would Linger Yet, and In Harbor. While Hayne did not strike a deeply original note, he cult[7 more...]
William Gilmore Simms (search for this): chapter 2.16
idered a literary centre. Here for many years Simms, See also Book II, Chap. VII. as the edito of friends and younger men who gathered about Simms, the most promising was Paul Hamilton Hayne (1 Sea. Henry Timrod (1829-67), the friend of Simms and Hayne, had also definitely dedicated himseedition may doubtless be attributed to William Gilmore Simms's War poetry of the South (1866). It w said for the critical standards which allowed Simms to publish so much unworthy poetry, none more the value of the book and our appreciation of Simms's critical judgment. In 1869 appeared The S, biographical sketches, and bibliographies of Simms, Hayne, Mrs. Preston, Flash, and Randall, and crap-books, collected in volumes like those of Simms and Miss Mason, sifted by the later editors ancame more and more uncertain, William Gilmore Simms, now in his old age, did all in his power to rs of his poetry. As a connecting link between Simms and Lanier he has a permanent place in the lit[3 more...]
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