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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). Search the whole document.

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the keenest interest. Henry Lynden Flash was on the staff of General Joseph Wheeler and was thus prepared by his experience to write his tributes to Zollicoffer, Polk, and Jackson. Dr. Francis O. Ticknor was in charge of the hospital work at Columbus, Georgia, and ministered to the needs of soldiers, among them the brave Tennesr written anything which was not finished at a single sitting, and has never been more than two hours writing anything he has ever published. He wrote his poem on Polk when his foreman told him that he lacked six or seven inches for the makeup of The daily Confederate. You have written about Zollicoffer and Jackson, you might as well write about Polk, who was killed the other day. Flash quickly responded to the suggestion, and in five minutes the poem was in the hands of the composer, and in twenty minutes was being printed. Paying full tribute to Flash's good qualities, the author warns him that without work there is not the remotest chance for an endu
John Banister Tabb (search for this): chapter 2.16
he made immortal in Little Giffen. Abram J. (Father) Ryan could never have written The conquered Banner and The sword of Robert Lee if he had not visualized as a chaplain the heroism and tragedy of the long struggle. William Gordon McCabe, who went from the University of Virginia as one of the Southern Guards, was a poet of the trenches, giving expression in his Dreaming in the trenches and Christmas night of ‘62 to the quieter and gentler aspects of a soldier's life. Sidney Lanier and John B. Tabb, See Book III, Chap. IV. after living the romantic life of soldiers, sealed a memorable friendship by a common suffering in the prison at Point Lookout. The feeling of the South as represented by all these poets first expressed itself in music. Southern soldiers were quick to seize upon Dixie, the words of which had been written by Dan D. Emmett for Bryant's minstrels in 1859. Except for the refrain and a few haunting phrases, the words were totally inadequate, but the music prov
iles's God save the South, Randall's Battle Cry of the South, Mrs. Warfield's Chant of Defiance, Thompson's Coercion, and Hope's Oath of freedom. Among the group of Virginia poets who wrote of the early battles on Virginia soil, John R. Thompson (1822-73) and Mrs. Preston (1820-97) stand out as the most conspicuous. Of distinctly higher quality than the crude rhymes already referred to were Thompson's humorous poems on some of the early Southern victories. His On to Richmond, modelled on Southey's March to Moscow, is an exceedingly clever poem. His mastery of double and triple rhymes, his unfailing sense of the value of words, and his happy use of the refrain (the pleasant excursion to Richmond) make this poem one of the marked achievements of the period. Scarcely less successful in their brilliant satire are his Farewell to Pope, England's Neutrality, and The Devil's delight. The humour of these poems soon gave way, however, to the more heroic and tragic aspects of the war. T
Maurice Thompson (search for this): chapter 2.16
ral poems which are as unlike his later writings as anything could well be. Davidson has the credit too of publishing for the first time in this volume McCabe's Dreaming in the trenches and Christmas night of ‘62, and certain recent poems of Maurice Thompson and Sidney Lanier. He also has much to say of poems that do not relate to the war. In 1882 Francis F. Browne of Chicago carried out the purpose that Richard Grant White had expressed by publishing Bugle echoes—a collection of poems of ththe principal events of the war in rapid review. The gauntlet was thrown down in the poems hitherto cited and also in Tucker's The Southern Cross, Miles's God save the South, Randall's Battle Cry of the South, Mrs. Warfield's Chant of Defiance, Thompson's Coercion, and Hope's Oath of freedom. Among the group of Virginia poets who wrote of the early battles on Virginia soil, John R. Thompson (1822-73) and Mrs. Preston (1820-97) stand out as the most conspicuous. Of distinctly higher quality th
Francis O. Ticknor (search for this): chapter 2.16
on, and Simms himself, six by Hayne, three by Ticknor, three by Flash, and, above all, eleven by Ti the Confederate dead (written in 1867) and Dr. Ticknor's Little Giffen of Tennessee, which, though, and Randall, and surprisingly short ones of Ticknor and Lucas. It required courage on the author such as Hayne's edition of Timrod (1873), of Ticknor (1879), of Hayne (1882), he finds a much largc, Holmes's Voyage of the good ship Union and Ticknor's Virginians of the Valley, Lowell's Commemor were visualized also by a Georgia poet, Francis O. Ticknor (1822-74), whose wife was one of the diss followed by Flash's tribute to Zollicoffer, Ticknor's poem on Albert Sidney Johnston, Hayne's Thenected also with the battles of the West were Ticknor's Loyal and Little Giffen of Tennessee—the labut they lack the freshness and the vigour of Ticknor's poem. With the publication of Hayne's porst fine careless rapture of his great song. Ticknor and Bruns followed with devotion the life of [6 more...]
Theodore O'Hara (search for this): chapter 2.16
Southern opinion and feeling no better evidence could be given than the fact that practically all those who wrote poetry during the Civil War were either participants in the actual struggle or were intimately connected with those who were. Theodore O'Hara, who had been in active service during the Mexican War and had written The Bivouac of the dead in honour of those who died in that war, was colonel of an Alabama regiment and later a staff officer in the Confederate Army. Henry Rootes Jackssing from a stage where you young men are to succeed me, and inscribed for his tombstone the poignant words: Here lies one who, after a reasonably long life, distinguished chiefly by unceasing labours, has left all his better works undone. Meek, O'Hara, John R. Thompson, and Henry Timrod were all dead by 1875. Randall spent many years in the drudgery of a newspaper office, never recapturing the first fine careless rapture of his great song. Ticknor and Bruns followed with devotion the life of
Emily V. Mason (search for this): chapter 2.16
he editors is that Henry R. Jackson's My wife and child is attributed to General J. T. [T. J., or Stonewall] Jackson. More than half of the volume is given up to Songs of the Southland and other poems by Kentucky. In the following year Miss Emily V. Mason of Virginia edited The Southern poems of the Civil War. She had from the beginning of the war conceived the design of collecting and preserving the various war poems which (born of the excited state of the public mind) then inundated our to underrate poetry and to discourage literary production found their deepest emotions expressed in martial strains, or in meditative lyrics. Written for local newspapers, preserved in scrap-books, collected in volumes like those of Simms and Miss Mason, sifted by the later editors and collectors, they preserve heroes and incidents, landscapes and sentiments that will always endear them to the Southern people. If we consider the poems from this last point of view, they serve to suggest the
Edward Coate Pinkney (search for this): chapter 2.16
uick to feel the poetic instinct and the influence of other poets, content with an occasional poem or a single volume, and thenceforth prone to lead a life of culture rather than of creative activity. The result was that the South, in 1860, had found no adequate expression of her life, no interpretation of her ideals, not even a description of her natural scenery. What writing there was, with few exceptions, was not of the soil nor of the people. Poe, See Book II, Chap. XIV. Edward Coate Pinkney (1802-28), author of the exquisite love-compliment A Health, and Richard Henry Wilde (1789-1847), who wrote the fragrant Stanzas beginning My life is like the summer rose, might have written anywhere. One poem of the War of 1812, one or two of the Mexican War, and some half dozen other lyrics constituted, despite the appearance of not a few volumes of well-meant verse, See Bibliography the poetic output of the South before the Civil War. The Civil War aroused intense emotions t
Augustus Baldwin Longstreet (search for this): chapter 2.16
Army of Tennessee had each its history rudely chronicled as fast as made in this rough minstrelsy. Every corps and command contributed some commemorative stanza. The current events of campaigns were told in improvised verse as rapidly as they occurred and were thereafter skillfully recited by the rhapsodist who professed to know the whole fragmentary epic. Forms of such rhymed narratives may be seen in typical stanzas: Marse Robert said, ‘My soldiers, You've nothing now to fear, For Longstreet's on the right of them, And Jackson's in the rear.’ The Fourteenth Louisiana, They charged 'em with a yell; They bagged them buck-tailed rangers And sent 'em off to hell. O Morgan crossed the river, And I went across with him; I was captured in Ohio Because I could not swim. No matter where this song was sung, or by whom, or which of its multitude of stanzas happened to be selected by the minstrel, the following verse always closed it: But now my song is ended, And I haven't got much t
James Wood Davidson (search for this): chapter 2.16
y a conglomeration of poems with little to aid the student of literary history. In 1869 James Wood Davidson's Living writers of the South was published in New York, with salient facts as to the biotely grateful that he has not. In his criticism of Flash, for whom he shows much enthusiasm, Davidson puts his finger upon the cardinal defects of many of the Southern poets. Flash, he says, has nion so called, and a contempt for the art of versification. Apart from his critical judgment Davidson shows the ability of a careful editor in weighing evidence as to the authorship of All quiet alad claimed as the work of Lamar Fontaine. Now by some ascribed to Thaddeus Oliver (1826-64). Davidson publishes Fontaine's letter claiming positively the authorship, but side by side with it is ones the author of several poems which are as unlike his later writings as anything could well be. Davidson has the credit too of publishing for the first time in this volume McCabe's Dreaming in the tre
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