hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charles Sumner 918 2 Browse Search
Department de Ville de Paris (France) 302 0 Browse Search
George S. Hillard 221 1 Browse Search
W. W. Story 176 0 Browse Search
William W. Story 154 0 Browse Search
France (France) 154 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 134 0 Browse Search
Simon Greenleaf 129 11 Browse Search
Francis Lieber 112 16 Browse Search
Jonathan French 98 6 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. Search the whole document.

Found 589 total hits in 309 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
Alton (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
, beginning with,— I would not have a slave to till my ground. At one time he wrote: The South will say, in less than one hundred years, Who shall deliver us from the body of this death? His memorandum-books contain numerous passages showing his sympathy with the antislavery movement. At one time he recorded his conviction that Congress ought to abolish slavery in the District of Columbia. He denounced the proslavery riots which took place in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Alton. Indeed, there was no topic on which he was more thoughtful and earnest. His relation to an attempted reclamation of some fugitive slaves deserves a record. On July 30, 1836, two colored women, alleged to be slaves, were held on board a brig in Boston Harbor, by one Turner, the agent of a Maryland slaveholder, with the intent to carry them to that State. On that day, a writ of habeas corpus was granted, at the instance of some philanthropic persons. A deputy-sheriff served the writ o
South Orange (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
d his sister Julia. The Sumners surrendered voluntarily, and without the assertion of an adverse claim, to the heirs of Albert's wife all her property; and the Barclays certified in a formal letter to George Sumner, the administrator of Albert, that the Barclays had no legal claim to the property, and this fact was known both to yourself and to the other heirs-at-law. Such conduct merits the esteem and approbation of every honorable man. Henry was born, Nov. 22, 1814, and died in South Orange, N. J., May 5, 1852. He received a mercantile education, travelled in the Southern States, and visited the West Indies and South America. In 1838, he held for a few months the office of deputy-sheriff, by his father's appointment. George was born, Feb. 5, 1817, and died, Oct. 6, 1863. He was trained in the public schools and a counting-house. He developed in his youth the spirit of adventure; and, at the age of twenty-one, sailed as the supercargo of a ship for Russia, where he receiv
San Francisco (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
nown fraternity of social reformers. It was remarkable that two brothers, not at the time sea-faring men, should end their lives in different shipwrecks. For a detailed account of the shipwreck, see Memoir of Margaret Fuller Ossoli, bv R. W. Emerson, W. H. Channing, and J. F. Clarke, Vol. II. pp. 341-351. Julia was born, May 5, 1827, and died, May 29, 1876; the last survivor of the nine children, and the only one who outlived Charles. She married, in 1854, Dr. John Hastings, of San Francisco. Her children, Alice, Edith, and Julia, are the only living issue of Charles Pinckney Sumner. She was an invalid for many years. She was beloved for her sweetness of nature and her true womanliness. Her last visit to the Atlantic States was in 1862, and her ill-health did not permit her to make a later one. She visited Washington at that time. Charles accompanied her to New York, and parted with her at the steamer, as she sailed on her return. I shall never forget, she afterwards
West Indies (search for this): chapter 2
Nobleman leaving the University, Pope's Eloisa to Abelard, Goldsmith's Edwin and Angelina, Shenstone's Pastoral Ballad, and some pieces in Enfield's Speaker. Sumner did not persevere as a teacher. In 1797-98 he passed nearly a year in the West Indies. He then began the study of law with Judge George R. Minot, an historical writer and effective public speaker. As early as 1799 he accepted an invitation from Josiah Quincy to a desk in his law-office; and was, while the relation continued, law. Such conduct merits the esteem and approbation of every honorable man. Henry was born, Nov. 22, 1814, and died in South Orange, N. J., May 5, 1852. He received a mercantile education, travelled in the Southern States, and visited the West Indies and South America. In 1838, he held for a few months the office of deputy-sheriff, by his father's appointment. George was born, Feb. 5, 1817, and died, Oct. 6, 1863. He was trained in the public schools and a counting-house. He develope
South River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
r. After that he seldom voted, and did not sympathize with the partisan bitterness of the day. His favorite notion, for the rest of his life, was that it was the duty of a good citizen to speak well of, and to sustain, the powers that be. He was admitted, in 1803, into the Society of the Cincinnati, as the successor of his father. Mr. Sumner was married, April 25, 1810, to Relief Jacob, of Hanover. They had formed an acquaintance while both were boarding with Captain Adams Bailey, on South-Russell Street. Miss Jacob, at the time of her marriage, was living with Shepard Simonds, on the corner of May (Revere) and South-Russell Streets. She had, since leaving Hanover, been earning her livelihood with her needle, upon work received at her room. Crossing the street from the Simonds house, they were married by Justice Robert Gardner, in their new home, a frame house which they had hired, situated at the West End, on the southeast corner of May (Revere) and Buttolph (Irving) Street
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 2
nd died in South Orange, N. J., May 5, 1852. He received a mercantile education, travelled in the Southern States, and visited the West Indies and South America. In 1838, he held for a few months the office of deputy-sheriff, by his father's appointment. George was born, Feb. 5, 1817, and died, Oct. 6, 1863. He was trained in the public schools and a counting-house. He developed in his youth the spirit of adventure; and, at the age of twenty-one, sailed as the supercargo of a ship for Russia, where he received many civilities from the Czar Nicholas and his court. From this time until 1852, he travelled, without the interval of any visit to his country, in the East and in Europe; studying languages, politics, and institutions, observing with rare diligence contemporary events, and profiting by a large acquaintance with scholars and public men. He made Paris his home, and knew French affairs well,—better, probably, than most Frenchmen. He was commended both by Tocqueville and Al
Marblehead (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
and the character of Sancho, Esq. Remaining at Billerica but a short time, he obtained, through the influence of Rev. Dr. Freeman and Colonel Samuel Swan, of Dorchester, a place as assistant in the private school of Rev. Henry Ware at Hingham, on a salary of £ 150, with special reference to the instruction of two lads, one of whom was John Codman, afterwards the pastor of the second church in Dorchester. An intimate friendship had grown up in college between Sumner and Joseph Story, of Marblehead, who was two years his junior in the course. A correspondence ensued. Their letters are playful, and hopeful of the future. Sumner's letters refer to books and poems he had read, as Hogarth Moralized, Roberts' Epistle to a Young Gentleman on leaving Eton School, Masson's Elegy to a Young Nobleman leaving the University, Pope's Eloisa to Abelard, Goldsmith's Edwin and Angelina, Shenstone's Pastoral Ballad, and some pieces in Enfield's Speaker. Sumner did not persevere as a teacher. I
Hanover (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
was the duty of a good citizen to speak well of, and to sustain, the powers that be. He was admitted, in 1803, into the Society of the Cincinnati, as the successor of his father. Mr. Sumner was married, April 25, 1810, to Relief Jacob, of Hanover. They had formed an acquaintance while both were boarding with Captain Adams Bailey, on South-Russell Street. Miss Jacob, at the time of her marriage, was living with Shepard Simonds, on the corner of May (Revere) and South-Russell Streets. She had, since leaving Hanover, been earning her livelihood with her needle, upon work received at her room. Crossing the street from the Simonds house, they were married by Justice Robert Gardner, in their new home, a frame house which they had hired, situated at the West End, on the southeast corner of May (Revere) and Buttolph (Irving) Streets, occupying a part of what is now the site of the Bowdoin school house. Here eight of their children, all but the youngest, Julia, were born. Mr. Sumn
Edwin V. Sumner (search for this): chapter 2
he government and slavery. His relative, Edwin V. Sumner, a lieutenant of the regular army in 183315, June 11 and 18, July 2, 9, and 23. Sheriff Sumner attended, in his early manhood, the servicen they meet, they ought never to part. Sheriff Sumner was a scholarly man for his time. He readetermination to renew it the next year. Sheriff Sumner's health was feeble in his later years. H intervened between his death and hers. Sheriff Sumner was very formal in his manners and punctilof him is preserved. The papers left by Sheriff Sumner are the chief sources of this sketch. Inf, To love,—and then to lose. In person, Mrs. Sumner was tall and slender. She enjoyed health aof eighty-one. Brothers and sisters. Sheriff Sumner had nine children. Of these, Charles and a life-boat were picked up a week after. Captain Sumner and his family had entered another boat, w that the father inherited their property. Mrs. Sumner's estate thus descended to the heirs of her[2 more...]
c policy, with the view to obtain a reconsideration of the doctrine as held by the court. He failed to convince the judges; but his conclusion is in accord with the later authorities in other States, where it is held that the true owner, whose property an officer in good faith undertakes to seize, with a process against another, cannot lawfully obstruct or assault the officer, but must resort to a writ of replevin, or other civil remedy. State v. Donner, 8 Vermont Reports, 424; State v. Buchanan, 17 id. 573; State v. Fifield, 18 New Hampshire Reports, 34; Faris v. State, 3 Ohio State Reports, 159. Sheriff Sumner performed his duties with scrupulous fidelity and exactness. His fearlessness was remarked on the occasion of the riot in Broad Street, June 11, 1837, between the Irish and an engine company, when under the statute it became his duty to read the riot act. In the latter part of his life the perplexities of his office annoyed him. He was too formal and punctilious, too r
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...