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New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Samian wine,— wishing to lose no opportunity of seeing the people and talking the language; and at once inscribed myself again for the malle-posteby the passage of the Stelvio to Innsbruck. Started Sunday morning at eleven o'clock, and arrived at Innsbruck Wednesday morning at ten; sleeping out of the carriage but three and a half hours during those three days and three nights. The pass over the Alps is magnificent, dwarfing infinitely any thing I have ever seen among the mountains of New Hampshire or Vermont. It is the highest road in Europe, being eight thousand nine hundred feet above the level of the sea, in the region of perpetual snow, and amidst flashing glaciers. We stopped for a little sleep at twelve o'clock at night, at Santa Maria, a thousand feet below the summit. It was the sixth of October: we had left the plains of Italy warm with sunshine; here was sharp winter. The house was provided with double windows; my bed had warm clothing, to which I added my heavy cloa
Geneva (Switzerland) (search for this): chapter 16
He was so soon to be at home that he reserved the details of the latter part of his journey for conversations with his friends. From Vienna he wrote to his mother, urging that his brother Horace, a boy of fifteen, should be sent to a school at Geneva, then attended by a son of Mr. Webster and other boys from Boston, of which he had, after careful inquiry, formed a very favorable opinion; but she wisely placed her son, a slender youth, in an excellent public school at home. His friends at hn, Among the souvenirs which Sumner purchased during his visit to Europe in 1858-59, the one which he prized most and showed frequently to visitors was the Album of Camillus Cardoyn, a Neapolitan nobleman, who collected during his residence at Geneva, 1608-1640, the autographs of distinguished persons passing through that city. One of these was the Earl of Strafford's as follows:— Qui nimis notus omnibus ignotus moritur sibi, Tho. Wentworth, Anglus, 1612. Another was that of John Milto
Auerbach (Saxony, Germany) (search for this): chapter 16
found the way easy to extending my acquaintance. But I left Vienna immediately, rode a night and a day and night over a dismal country to Prague: there passed a day; saw its bridge, its ancient towers, and the palace of the Bohemian kings. Then another night and day to Dresden, where I thought of Italy as I looked upon the beautiful paintings; then to Leipsic, on a railway where one of the cars was called Washington. At Leipsic, examined that great battlefield, and drank the red wine in Auerbach's cellar, where Mephistopheles once was; then another night and day to Berlin. But this must soon end. This bright charm of travel will be soon broken,—my book and staff sunk in the deepest well, and I in Boston. In a week or fortnight, I shall leave here,—make a rapid course (we fly by night) to Heidelberg; then down the Rhine to Cologne; then to Brussels, Antwerp, London,—where I shall be at the end of January,—thence to sail for America. If this letter reaches you by the British Que
Frankfort (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
l ally and a sympathizing companion. Leaving Berlin, Jan. 9, 1840, he went by the way of Leipsic, Weimar, Gotha, and Frankfort to Heidelberg, where he remained five weeks, enjoying the society of its celebrated professors, particularly of Mittererson I know. He is a finished scholar, and much my friend. He will receive you warmly. I leave Berlin to-morrow for Frankfort and Heidelberg. If you can write me while in London, address care of Coates & Co., Bread Street; otherwise, address si February 11. Left Berlin in the middle of January, cold as the North Pole, and passed to Leipsic, to Weimar, Gotha, Frankfort, and Heidelberg; for a day and night was shut up in the carriage with four Jews, one a great Rabbi with a tremendous bof the interesting people there, among whom was a kinsman of yours, Henry Howard; Leipsic, Gotha, and the Ducal Palace; Frankfort, Heidelberg, where I am now enjoying the simplicity of German life unadulterated by fashionable and diplomatic intercou
Denmark (Denmark) (search for this): chapter 16
ld, and supported by masterly minds. People are of different opinions as to the character of Nicholas. Some call him very clever, and others say he does not know how to govern his empire. I speak, of course, of diplomatic persons whose opinions so vary. Then there is the eternal Eastern Question,—still unsettled, though Mehemet Ali has taken decisive ground. He is making preparations for war. If the Powers let the war-spirit out, it will be difficult for them to control it. The King of Denmark is dead, and his people are begging for more liberal institutions, or rather for some, for they have none. The King of Sweden, old Bernadotte, cannot live long, and his death will be the signal for a change. The King of Prussia is old; his people will demand a constitution on his death, which his successor may be too prudent to deny, though his inclinations are against it: at heart a very good man, but an absolutist. Austria is quiet and happy; but when Prince Metternich leaves the stag
Weimar (Thuringia, Germany) (search for this): chapter 16
essions of regret; but none of them like me has lost a faithful ally and a sympathizing companion. Leaving Berlin, Jan. 9, 1840, he went by the way of Leipsic, Weimar, Gotha, and Frankfort to Heidelberg, where he remained five weeks, enjoying the society of its celebrated professors, particularly of Mittermaier, who awaited wiermany, was born March 22, 1797, and succeeded on his brother's death to the throne. He married, in 1829, a daughter of the Grand Duke Charles Frederick, of Saxe-Weimar. The Crown Prince, who seems bon garcon,inquired about our summers: he thought they must be magnificent. I told him I thought so, till I had been in Italy. He aent to my own, I value beyond price that of my friends. February 11. Left Berlin in the middle of January, cold as the North Pole, and passed to Leipsic, to Weimar, Gotha, Frankfort, and Heidelberg; for a day and night was shut up in the carriage with four Jews, one a great Rabbi with a tremendous beard. I heard their view
France (France) (search for this): chapter 16
ecord of his life abroad than those which he wrote from England and France. He was so soon to be at home that he reserved the details of the poses to stay in Europe two or three years more; to visit Germany, France, and perhaps Spain, as well as England, Scotland, and Ireland. Ition of the Nemours dotation bill, the most democratic. measure in France since the Revolution of July; and yet in my conscience I think it rain is not yet free from distractions. Don Carlos is a prisoner in France. Maroto Don Rafael Maroto, a Spanish general and Carlist, 1785-e dragged out of it. The golden writers of the sixteenth century in France will be remembered ever, except in France,where they are now forgotFrance,where they are now forgotten,—Cujas, Doneau, Dumoulin, and Faber; but that vast body whose tomes weigh down the shelves of the three or four preceding centuries have p had pored for several days over the monstrosities of Bartolus. In France it several times happened to me to defend the Roman law against men
Jena (Thuringia, Germany) (search for this): chapter 16
in russet clad; but lovely indeed must it be when they are invested with the green and purple of summer and autumn. Every thing is on the simplest scale. I dined with Mittermaier, Ante, Vol. I. p. 160. who, out of deference to my habit of dining late, placed his dinner at half-past 12 instead of twelve, though he told me he was afraid it would trouble Mr. Thibaut, Anton Friedrich Justus Thibaut died March 28, 1840, at the age of sixty-six. He was Professor of Law successively at Kiel, Jena, and Heidelberg. He advocated as early as 1814 a national code. See references to Thibaut and Mittermaier, Works, Vol. II. p. 442.—dear old man,—who was to be of the party, and who was not accustomed to such late hours. Think of me, who, in every country which I have visited, have dined later than everybody else, and never take any thing from breakfast till dinner. At the table at that hour, of course, I had no appetite; and Madame Mittermaier said, with much naivete;, Why, you do not ea
Strafford, Vt. (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
the copy of Milton edited by himself in 1826 (Pickering's edition). He has a collection of upwards of one hundred works about Milton, Among the souvenirs which Sumner purchased during his visit to Europe in 1858-59, the one which he prized most and showed frequently to visitors was the Album of Camillus Cardoyn, a Neapolitan nobleman, who collected during his residence at Geneva, 1608-1640, the autographs of distinguished persons passing through that city. One of these was the Earl of Strafford's as follows:— Qui nimis notus omnibus ignotus moritur sibi, Tho. Wentworth, Anglus, 1612. Another was that of John Milton as follows:— —if Vertue feeble were Heaven it selfe would stoope to her. Coelum non animu muto du trans mare curro. Joannes Miltonius, Anglus. Junii 10, 1639. The date is supposed to have been written by another hand. This autograph of Milton is described in the Ramblings in the Elucidation of the Autographs of Milton, by Samuel Leigh Sotheby, p. 107, w<
Knickerbocker (search for this): chapter 16
, new streets, and the worldly calls of American life,—shall muse upon the grandeur, the antiquity, and the beauty I have seen. But you will from time to time assist in calling them to my mind; write me in my exile; help me recall Europe, the great Past with which you live. Give all thou canst, and let me dream the rest. Yours of Rome, 11th November, I found on my arrival at this place. I am delighted at the success of the Orpheus. I am glad you have written about Crawford for the Knickerbocker. My letters are strangely behind, and I have no advices with regard to what I wrote home. I shall begin to believe there must be some truth in that bust of me, after what you say of Sir C. Vaughan. I am pleased that he ordered his bust; it will do Crawford good. Many of our countrymen are so weak as to make their judgments depend upon Englishmen, and I know none of his countrymen whose patronage ought to avail more with Americans. He was the most popular minister, I think, that ever
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