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Edward Thornton (search for this): chapter 10
rz, Morrill of Vermont. General Sickles, General Webb, W. M. Evarts, Edmund Quincy, Agassiz. Ex-President Roberts of Liberia, Berthemy the French minister, Sir Edward Thornton the English minister, Gerolt the Prussian minister, and Blacque Bey the Turkish minister. Geore William Curtis, while at Washington as chairman of the Civister, who is in California, has all her small means in five-twenties, but I have not counselled any change. I fear that this is a very unsatisfactory letter. Mr. Thornton Sir Edward Thornton, British minister. has arrived. We have exchanged calls without meeting. I hear him called amiable and interesting. I cannot cease to dSir Edward Thornton, British minister. has arrived. We have exchanged calls without meeting. I hear him called amiable and interesting. I cannot cease to deplore the blow dealt at arbitration by the English government, through whose representative it was recognized at the Congress of Paris as the proper mode of deciding questions between nations. Sumner made an elaborate speech in favor of a return to specie payments, in which he reprobated various schemes for tampering with the
and a solace to me if I know that you are under my roof. he kept aloof from parties, but he could now return the courtesies which he had been receiving as a bachelor. Among those known to have dined with him are Seward, Motley, Fish, Conking, Hooper. Reverdy Johnson, ,John Sherman, Carl Schurz, Morrill of Vermont. General Sickles, General Webb, W. M. Evarts, Edmund Quincy, Agassiz. Ex-President Roberts of Liberia, Berthemy the French minister, Sir Edward Thornton the English minister, Gerolt the Prussian minister, and Blacque Bey the Turkish minister. Geore William Curtis, while at Washington as chairman of the Civil Service Commission, in June. 1871, though not accepting Sumner's invitation to occupy a room at his house, died with him every day, joining him afterwards in his drive, and the next winter was also almost daily at his house. Members of the diplomatic corps were often at his round table. He was catholic in his relations with men, and his guests were of no one polit
Anne Boleyn (search for this): chapter 10
s Gellius; Erasmus's St. Luke, with original pen-and-ink designs by Holbein on the margins; Bunyan's Bible; Dryden's Greek exercise-book studied by the poet when a boy at the Westminster School; Voltaire's tragedy of Mahomet, with his corrections; Pope's Essay on Man, with his revision in ink for a new edition; a gift copy of Thomson's Spring, with verses in the author's handwriting on the titlepage; Dr. Parr's Hobbes; The gift ,f Sir William Molesworth. and books which had belonged to Anne Boleyn, Queen Elizabeth, a doge of Venice, Ben Jonson, Wordsworth, Turgot, and Napoleon. With these were autographs of reformers, popes, kings, statesmen, poets; and choicest of all to Sumner was the Album kept at Geneva, 1608-1640, in which Milton had recorded his name, an extract from Comus, and a line of Horace. Ante, vol. II. pp. 124, note; p. 351, note. Quaritch and other dealers in curiosities in London and Paris, as well as Sypher in New York, found in him a customer who rarely questi
Edward Atkinson (search for this): chapter 10
ake a new issue of currency for the purpose. The speech caused general alarm for the safety of the national honor. Edward Atkinson, of Boston, wrote to Sumner, February 29: Sherman's speech has created more distrust here than anything that has yet taken place. Mr. Atkinson contributed a series of papers to the New York Evening Post, which were published in a pamphlet, with the title Senator Sherman's Fallacies. William Endicott, Jr., of the same city, wrote the same day, invoking Sumner towould be an inexcusable perfidy should we break this solemn engagement. On technical points he had excellent advisers in Atkinson and Endicott, both experts in finance, and distinguished for disinterested patriotism. It was a characteristic of Sumnehis house. His colored friend, J. B. Smith, gave him a dinner, with Rev. Dr. Potter of New York, Moses Kimball, and Edward Atkinson among the guests. Sumner wrote to Whittier, November 13:— Last evening I was told that you were in Boston,
George Bemis (search for this): chapter 10
—Dr. Palfrey, E. L. Pierce, Dr. S. G. Howe, G. W. Greene, J. B. Smith, and M. Milmore,—while Emerson, Whittier, Agassiz, Bemis, G. W. Curtis, and James A. Hamilton received invitations which they were unable to accept. To Whittier he wrote: It wildator temporis acti in so saying; but he seems to my memory a giant, and I see no more of his kind. Sumner wrote to Mr. Bemis, Jan. 5, 1868:— I would not press you to any exertion inconsistent with health. But cannot you undertake a direcd depredations by the Alabama and other cruisers fitted out in that country. Both Seward and Sumner were desirous that Mr. Bemis should arrange the papers. To Lieber, March 28:— I think you will like the German treaty. To my mind it is efterwards sought and obtained a modification of the treaty, sending a special commission to China for the purpose. To Bemis, September 22, from Washington:— There seems to be a new and favorable turn. Seward is sanguine, and Johnson wr
A. L. Howard (search for this): chapter 10
autographs, as well as Sumner's manners and style of living and conversation, have been often described. Recollections of Charles Sumner, by A. B. Johnson, Scribner's Magazine. August, 1874, pp. 475– 490; November, 1874. pp. 101-114; June, 1875, pp. 224-229; July. 1875, pp. 297-304; J. W. Forney's Anecdotes of Public Men, vol. II. pp. 259, 260; Christian Union, April 1, 1874, Springfield Republican, March 17, 1874, by Miss A. L. Dawes (Haigha); Philadelphia Press, Sept. 5, 1871, by Mrs. A. L. Howard; New York Independent, June 1, 1871, and March 26, 1874, and Outlines of Men, Women, and Things, pp. 43-45, by Mrs. M C. Ames; New York World, Dec. 11. 1869: Boston Journal, March 23, 1874, by B. P. Poore; Boston Commonwealth, April 4.1868, by C. W. Slack: San Francisco Post, March 24, 1874, by R. J. Hinton; Chicago Tribune, March 20, 1871, and March. 1874, by G. A. Townsend (Gath); New York Tribune, April 5, 1891, by Mrs. Janet Chase Hoyt; Chaplin's Life of Sumner, pp. 471-479. In on
A. W. Stevens (search for this): chapter 10
eye, At the time of his death he had read and returned the proof as far as page 467 of Vol. X. and he supplied notes for the eleventh; but with the exception of the Prophetic Voices concerning America, which at the time of his death he was enlarging for a separate publication, it fell to his literary executors to complete the enterprise, with the assistance of proof-readers, acting under Mr. Longfellow's immediate direction. The last two volumes, the proofs of which were read by Mr. A. W. Stevens, did not appear till May, 1883, on account of a suspension of the work, the completion of which Mr. Longfellow and Mr. Nichols did not live to see. The announcement of the proposed complete edition of his Works called out a large number of notices, which dwelt at length on his habits of mind, his style, and his position as a statesman. The one contributed to the New York Independent, May 12, 1870, was from the distinguished scholar, Moses Coit Tyler. Sumner's name had at different
Newman Hall (search for this): chapter 10
e with that power; but President Cleveland (lid not exercise the power conferred. and the arrest of private individuals for public wrongs as peaceful remedies, denying that either proceeding was in accord with just principles or the practice of enlightened States. He said:— Suppose the law is passed, and the authority conferred upon the President. Whom shall he seize? What innocent foreigner, what trustful traveller, what honored guest? It may be Mr. Dickens or Mr. Trollope or Rev. Newman Hall; or it may be some merchant here on business, guiltless of any wrong and under the constant safeguard of the public faith. Permit me to say, sir, that the moment you do this, you will cover the country with shame, of which the present bill will be the painful prelude. You will be guilty of a barbarism kindred to that of the Abyssinian king Theodorus; you will degrade the national name, and make it a byword of reproach. Sir, now is the time to arrest this dishonor. See to it by your
N. P. Banks (search for this): chapter 10
ng on the country practices which had been disowned by civilized States. Sumner was obliged in the Senate to watch and counteract the House committee acting under Banks's leadership. The bill itself maintained very properly the right of individuals to dissolve their native allegiance and assume a new citizenship, thus settling a their best in debate to eliminate the obnoxious feature from the measure. Garfield read, as in conflict with it, the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution; but Banks could not see the point. At last, when the vote was taken, there occurred one of those scenes which illustrate the pusillanimity of public men when serving for sh this amendment as conferring undefined powers, even those of reprisal. July 23. Congressional Globe, pp. 4359, 4360. His colleague Wilson, once a member, like Banks, of the Know-Nothing order, supported the bill, even voting for Williams's amendment. He approved the definition in the bill of the rights of citizenship growing o
John W. Forney (search for this): chapter 10
d style of living and conversation, have been often described. Recollections of Charles Sumner, by A. B. Johnson, Scribner's Magazine. August, 1874, pp. 475– 490; November, 1874. pp. 101-114; June, 1875, pp. 224-229; July. 1875, pp. 297-304; J. W. Forney's Anecdotes of Public Men, vol. II. pp. 259, 260; Christian Union, April 1, 1874, Springfield Republican, March 17, 1874, by Miss A. L. Dawes (Haigha); Philadelphia Press, Sept. 5, 1871, by Mrs. A. L. Howard; New York Independent, June 1, 187 in any letter or public way; and, as far as known, he acquiesced without protest in the final decision of his party. The Cincinnati Commercial. July 19, 1891, published D. C. Forney's statement concerning a private meeting at the rooms of John W. Forney in Washington, 1). C., Nov. 6, 1867, for conference on the political situation, where were present Senators Wade, Chandler, and Sumner, John W. and D. C. Forney. D. K. Cartter, General Rawlins, 0. E. Babcock, and others. All present were in
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