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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1.

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, Benjamin Clarke Cutler, married Sarah (Mitchell) Hyrne, daughter of Thomas Mitchell'and Esther (or Hester) Marion. To most people, the name of Marion suggests one person only,--General Francis Marion of Revolutionary fame; yet it was the grandfather of the General, Benjamin Marion, of La Rochelle, who was the first of the name to settle in this country, coming hither when the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes drove the Huguenots into exile. Brigadier-General Peter Horry, See Horry and Weems, Life of Marion. General Horry was a most zealous and devoted friend; as a biographer his accuracy is questionable, his picturesqueness never. friend and biographer of General Marion, quotes the letter which told Benjamin of his banishment:-- Your damnable heresy well deserves, even in this life, that purgation by fire which awfully awaits it in the next. But in consideration of your youth and worthy connections, our mercy has condescended to commute your punishment to perpetual exile
estoration and settled at Newport in Rhode Island. His son Thomas married Amy Smith, a granddaughter of Roger Williams. Thomas's son Richard became Governor of Rhode Island and had fourteen children, among them Samuel, who in turn became Governor of the Colony, and a member of the Continental Congress. He was the only Colonial governor who refused to take the oath to enforce the Stamp Act. In 1775, in the Continental Congress, he was made Chairman of the Committee of the Whole, which from 1774 to 1776 sat daily, working without intermission in the cause of independence. But though one of the framers of the Declaration, he was not destined to be a signer. John Adams says of him, When he was seized with the smallpox he said that if his vote and voice were necessary to support the cause of his country, he should live; if not, he should die. He died, and the cause of his country was supported, but it lost one of its most sincere and punctual advocates. The correspondence between G
William Greene (search for this): chapter 1
unt of the last-named battle, which may be found in Washington's correspondence. During the terrible winter at Valley Forge, Lieutenant-Colonel Ward obtained a month's furlough, wooed and married his cousin, Phoebe Greene (daughter of Governor William Greene, of Rhode Island, and of the beautiful Catherine Ray, Granddaughter of Simon Ray, one of the original owners of the island. He was pressed in a cheese-press on account of his religious opinions. of Block Island), and returned to thnes of Warwick, Greenes of East Greenwich; all through Colonial and Revolutionary history we find their names. Sturdy, active, patriotic men: Generals, Colonels, and Governors of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, chief among them Governor William Greene, the War Governor, and General Nathanael Greene of glorious memory. Our liveliest association with the name of Greene is the memory of Mrs. Nancy Greene, first cousin of our grandfather Ward and daughter-in-law of the General who died
Julia Ward Howe (search for this): chapter 1
Chapter 1: Ancestral These are my people, quaint and ancient, Gentlefolks with their prim old ways; This, their leader come from England, Governed a State in early days. I must vanish with my ancients, But a golden web of love Is around us and beneath us, Binds us to our home above. Julia Ward Howe. Our mother was once present at a meeting where there was talk of ancestry and heredity. One of the speakers dwelt largely upon the sins of the fathers. He drew stern pictures of the vice, the barbarism, the heathenism of the good old times, and ended by saying with emphasis that he felt himself bowed down beneath the burden of the sins of his ancestors. Our mother was on her feet in a flash. Mr. So-and-so, she said, is bowed down by the sins of his ancestors. I wish to say that all my life I have been buoyed up and lifted on by the remembrance of the virtues of mine! These words are so characteristic of her, that in beginning the story of her life it seems proper to d
John Cutler (search for this): chapter 1
ohn Demesmaker, On first coming to this country, Johannes Demesmaker settled in Hingham, Massachusetts. Later he moved to Boston, where he became known as Dr. John Cutler; married Mary Cowell, of Boston, and served as surgeon in King Philip's War. before mentioned, sometime physician and surgeon. Our mother was much attached to Grandma Cutler, and speaks thus of her in a sketch entitled The Elegant literature of sixty years ago : Grandma will read Owen Feltham's Resolves, albeit the print is too small for her eyes. She knows Pope and Crabbe by heart, admires Shenstone, and tells me which scenes are considered finest in this or that of Scott's novels. Calling one day upon a compeer of her own age, she was scandalized to find her occupied with a silly story called Jimmy Jessamy. Mrs. Cutler had known General Washington, and was fond of telling how at a ball the Commander-in-Chief crossed the room to speak to her. Many of her letters have been preserved, and show a sprightli
He was surprised to find them such plain men; yet were they exceeding warm. On December 29, 1792, he notes: Dined with Gouverneur Morris. Served upon plate — good wines — his Kitchen neither french or English, but between both. Servants french, apartments good.... I have visited the halls of painting and sculpture at the Louvre. The peices [sic] are all called chef d'ceuvres by connoisseurs. The oldest are thought the best, I cannot tell why, though some of the old peices are very good. Milo riving the oak is good.... He went to the theatre, and observed that the features which appeared to him most objectionable were specially applauded by the audience. Briefly, amid items of the sale of land, he thus notes the execution of Louis XVI:-- January 15th. The convention has this day decided upon two questions on the King; one that he was guilty, another that the question should not be sent to the people. January 17th.. The convention up all night upon the question of th
Benedict Arnold (search for this): chapter 1
ment, and our mother's grandfather. Born 1756, died 1832. He graduated in 1771 from Rhode Island College (now Brown University) with distinguished honors. In Trumbull's painting of the Attack on Quebec in 1776, there is a portrait of Lieutenant-Colonel Ward, a young, active figure with sword uplifted. His life was full of stirring incident. In 1775 he received his commission as Captain, and was one of two hundred and fifty of the Rhode Island troops who volunteered to join Benedict Arnold's command of eleven hundred men, ordered to advance by way of the Kennebec River to reinforce General Montgomery at Quebec. In a letter to his family, dated Point-aux-Trembles, November 26, 1775, Captain Ward says: We were thirty days in the wilderness, that none but savages ever attempted to pass. We marched a hundred miles upon shore with only three days provisions, waded over three rapid rivers, marched through snow and ice barefoot, passed over the St. Lawrence where it was guarde
erson certain qualities — a warmth of temperament, a personality glowing, sparkling, effervescent — akin to her own. If in addition to these qualities the person had red hair, she took him to her heart, and he could do no wrong. All this, and a host of tender associations beside, the name of Cutler meant to her; yet it may be questioned whether any of these characteristics would have appeared in the descendants of Johannes Demesmaker, worthy citizen of Holland, who, coming to this country in 1674, changed his name to Cutler for conveniencea sake, had not one of these descendants, Benjamin Clarke Cutler, married Sarah (Mitchell) Hyrne, daughter of Thomas Mitchell'and Esther (or Hester) Marion. To most people, the name of Marion suggests one person only,--General Francis Marion of Revolutionary fame; yet it was the grandfather of the General, Benjamin Marion, of La Rochelle, who was the first of the name to settle in this country, coming hither when the Revocation of the Edict of Nan
Gouverneur Morris (search for this): chapter 1
eral interest. One day the Colonel tells of a dinner party where he met Vergniaud and other prominent revolutionists. He was surprised to find them such plain men; yet were they exceeding warm. On December 29, 1792, he notes: Dined with Gouverneur Morris. Served upon plate — good wines — his Kitchen neither french or English, but between both. Servants french, apartments good.... I have visited the halls of painting and sculpture at the Louvre. The peices [sic] are all called chef d'ceuvis will cause a great degree of astonishment in America.... January 21st. Went to the Pont Royal to pass it at nine o'clock. Guards prevented me from going over. I had engaged to pass this day, which is one of horror, at Versailles, with Mr. Morris. The King was beheaded at eleven o'clock. Guards, at an early hour, took possession of the Place Louis XV, and were posted in each avenue. The most profound peace prevailed. Those who had feeling lamented in secret in their houses, or had le
Roger Williams (search for this): chapter 1
tors whose memory she cherished with such reverence. The name of Ward occurs first on the roll of Battle Abbey: Seven hundred and ten distinguished persons accompanied William of Normandy to England, among them Ward, one of the noble captains. Her first known ancestor, John Ward, of Gloucester, England, sometime cavalry officer in Cromwell's army, came to this country after the Restoration and settled at Newport in Rhode Island. His son Thomas married Amy Smith, a granddaughter of Roger Williams. Thomas's son Richard became Governor of Rhode Island and had fourteen children, among them Samuel, who in turn became Governor of the Colony, and a member of the Continental Congress. He was the only Colonial governor who refused to take the oath to enforce the Stamp Act. In 1775, in the Continental Congress, he was made Chairman of the Committee of the Whole, which from 1774 to 1776 sat daily, working without intermission in the cause of independence. But though one of the framers
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