hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Julia Ward Howe 173 7 Browse Search
Diva Julia 152 0 Browse Search
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) 135 1 Browse Search
Samuel Ward 117 5 Browse Search
Oak Glen (New Jersey, United States) 110 0 Browse Search
Villa Julia 108 0 Browse Search
Jesus Christ 106 0 Browse Search
Charles Sumner 92 2 Browse Search
Julia Ward 77 1 Browse Search
Battle Hymn 74 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. Search the whole document.

Found 242 total hits in 75 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Louisa Cutler (search for this): chapter 2
at certain tokens should inform him of the child's condition. A few days later, as he was riding homeward, a messenger came to meet him and silently laid in his hand a tiny shoe: the child was dead. Not long after this, on May 27, 1819, a second daughter was born, and named Julia. Julia Ward was very little when her parents moved to a large house on the Bowling Green, a region of high fashion in those days. Reminiscences, p. 4. Here were born three more children: Francis Marion, Louisa Cutler, and Ann Eliza. For some time before the birth of the lastnamed child, Mrs. Ward's health had been gradually failing, though every known measure had been used to restore it. There had been journeys to Niagara and up the Hudson, in the family coach, straw-color outside with linings and cushions of brilliant blue. Little Julia went with her mother on these journeys; the good elder sister, Eliza Cutler, was also of the party; and a physician, Dr. John Wakefield Francis, who was later to p
Samuel Ward (search for this): chapter 2
the firm, which was thereafter known as Prime, Ward & King. In a memoir of our grandfather, the efore no small triumph to have lived down, as Mr. Ward did, this prejudice, and to have forced upone first years of their married life, Mr. and Mrs. Ward lived in Marketfield Street, near the Batterion are here reproduced: Poems Dedicated to Samuel Ward esq By His affectionate daughter Julia Wardnot with a critic's eye. New York 1831. To Samuel Ward. Beloved father, Expect not to find ime childish game. Miss Ward (she was always Miss Ward, even in the nursery!) rebuked them for theiwas that the good old grandfather, Lieutenant-Colonel Samuel Ward, used to come from No. 7 to talk b labors, came safe through the ordeal. But Colonel Ward, who had not thought fit to flee the enemy, might be that he was not safe ! Years after, Mr. Ward told Julia of the anguish he suffered from threquent visitor there. The affection between Mr. Ward and his mother-in-law was warm and lively. [7 more...]
Henry Ward (search for this): chapter 2
re always far more picturesquely dressed than ours, although I can say little for their neatness. Oh! to what numberless parties they went, and how tipsy they invariably got! I can see distinctly to-day the upset wagon (boxes, on spools for wheels), and the muddy dresses, for they always fell into mud puddles. Marion was as pious as he was warlike. His morning sermons, delivered over the back of a chair, were fervent and eloquent; he was only seven years old when he wrote to his Cousin Henry Ward, who was ill with some childish ailment:-- Do not forget to say your prayers every morning and evening. I hope that you trust in God; and, my dear cousin, do not set your mind too much on Earthly things! And my dear cousin, this is the prayer. Follows the Lord's Prayer carefully written out. On the next page of the same sheet, the eight-year-old Julia adds her exhortation:-- Dear Cousin, I hope that you will say the Prayer which my Brother has written for you. I hear with re
Anne Eliza (search for this): chapter 2
; He will, if He thinks it right, Preserve me through this day. Let thy holy Spirit send Of heavenly light a ray; Thy face, oh! Lord, I fain would seek, But I am feeble, vain and weak; Oh, guide me in thy way! Let thy assistance, Lord, be given, That when life's path I've trod, And when the last frail tie is riven, My spirit may ascend to heaven, To dwell with thee, My God. We cannot resist quoting a stanza from the effusion entitled Father's Birthday :--Louisa brings a cushion rare, Anne Eliza a toothpick bright and fair; And O! accept the gift I bring, It is a daughter's offering. Julia's mind was not destined to remain in the evangelical mould which must have so rejoiced the heart of her father. In 1834, at the ripe age of fifteen, she describes her Vain Regrets written on looking over a diary kept while I was under serious impressions :-- Oh! happy days, gone, never to return At which fond memory will ever burn, Oh, Joyous hours, with peace and gladness blest, Whe
Owen Feltham (search for this): chapter 2
rd told Julia of the anguish he suffered from this uncertainty. It is with No. 16 Bond Street that we chiefly associate the sprightly figure of Grandma Cutler, who was a frequent visitor there. The affection between Mr. Ward and his mother-in-law was warm and lively. They had a little language of their own, and she was Lady Feltham (from her fondness for Feltham's Resolves, a book little in demand in the twentieth century); and he was her saucy Lark, or Plato. Mrs. Cutler died in 1836. d told Julia of the anguish he suffered from this uncertainty. It is with No. 16 Bond Street that we chiefly associate the sprightly figure of Grandma Cutler, who was a frequent visitor there. The affection between Mr. Ward and his mother-in-law was warm and lively. They had a little language of their own, and she was Lady Feltham (from her fondness for Feltham's Resolves, a book little in demand in the twentieth century); and he was her saucy Lark, or Plato. Mrs. Cutler died in 1836.
y; she soon began the study of Latin. Hearing a class reciting an Italian lesson, she was enchanted with the musical sound of the language; listened and marked, day after day, and presently handed to the amazed principal a note correctly written in Italian, begging permission to join the class. At nine years old she was reading Pilgrim's progress, and seeking its characters in the people she met every day. She always counted it one of the books which had most influenced her. Another was Gibbon's Decline and fall of the Roman Empire, which she read at seventeen. In later life she added to these the works of Spinoza, and of Theodore Parker. She began at an early age to write verse. A manuscript volume has been preserved in which some of these early poems were copied for her father. The title-page and dedication are here reproduced: Poems Dedicated to Samuel Ward esq By His affectionate daughter Julia Ward. Let me be thine Regard not with a critic's eye. New York 1831.
Dearest Laura Child (search for this): chapter 2
“Wash you, children, clean and white; God may call you any night.” Close my tender brother clung, While I said with doubtful tongue: “No, we cannot die so soon; For you told, the other noon, ” Of those months in order fine That should make the earth divine. I've not seen, scarce five years old, Months like those of which you told. “ Softly, then, the woman's hand Loosed my frock from silken band, Tender smoothed the fiery head, Often shamed for ringlets red. Somewhat gently did she say, ” Child, those months are every day. “ Still, methinks, I wait in fear, For that wonder-glorious year For a spring without a storm, Summer honey-dewed and warm, Autumn of robuster strength, Winter piled in crystal length. I will wash me clean and white; God may call me any night. I must tell Him when I go His great year is yet to know-- Year when working of the race Shall match Creation's dial face; Each hour be born of music's chime, And Truth eternal told in Time. J. W. H. Lieutenant
Sarah Hyrne (search for this): chapter 2
, of promoting liberal and beneficent enterprises, and of conducing to the welfare and prosperity of society, than for the means of individual and selfish gratification or indulgence. Mr. Ward's activities were not confined to financial affairs. He was founder and first president of the Bank of Commerce; one of the founders of the New York University and of the Stuyvesant Institute, etc., etc. In 1812 he married Julia Rush Cutler, second daughter of Benjamin Clarke and Sarah Mitchell (Hyrne) Cutler. Julia Cutler was sixteen years old at the time of her marriage, lovely in character and beautiful in person. She had been a pupil of the saintly Isabella Graham, and her literary taste had been carefully cultivated in the style of the day. One of her poems, found in Griswold's Female Poets of America, shows the deeply religious cast of her mind; yet she was full of gentle gayety, loved music, laughter, and pretty things. During the first years of their married life, Mr. and Mrs
she was, Julia felt at once that her embrace was unexpected and unwelcome. Sometimes they went to the pleasant farm at Jamaica, Long Island, where Lieutenant-Colonel Ward was living at this time, with his unmarried sons, and his two daughters, Phoebe and Anne. Phoebe was an invalid saint. She lived in a darkened room, and the plates and dishes from which she ate were of brown china or crockery, as she fancied her eyes could not bear white. Anne was equally pious, but more normal. She itPhoebe was an invalid saint. She lived in a darkened room, and the plates and dishes from which she ate were of brown china or crockery, as she fancied her eyes could not bear white. Anne was equally pious, but more normal. She it was who managed the farm, and who would always bring the cheeses to New York herself for the market, lest any of the family grow proud and belittle the dignity of honest work. It is from Jamaica that Mrs. Ward writes to her mother a letter which shows that though the tenderest of mothers, she had been strictly imbued with the Old Testament ideas of bringing up children. Dearest Mother, I find myself better since I came hither.... Husband more devoted than ever; children sweet thoa some
Julia Ward (search for this): chapter 2
Chapter 2: little Julia Ward 1819-1835; aet. 1-16 From my nursery: forty-six years ago Wheecond daughter was born, and named Julia. Julia Ward was very little when her parents moved to a ime before the birth of the lastnamed child, Mrs. Ward's health had been gradually failing, though t farm at Jamaica, Long Island, where Lieutenant-Colonel Ward was living at this time, with his unmy of honest work. It is from Jamaica that Mrs. Ward writes to her mother a letter which shows then she died and had borne seven children. Mr. Ward's grief at the death of this beloved wife waso the south across the woods and fields. The Ward children saw the street grow up around them; sas, Morgans, Grinnells, most of all by Wards. Mr. Ward was then at No. 16; his father, the old Revol of nine, but even the name of it is lost. Mr. Ward did not encourage intimacies with other childSamuel Ward esq By His affectionate daughter Julia Ward. Let me be thine Regard not with a critic'[6 more...]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8