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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. Search the whole document.

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. To New England Woman's Club; first time this year, to my great regret and loss. I was cordially welcomed.... A thought suddenly came to me, namely, that the liberal education of women would give the death-blow to superstition. I said, We women have been the depositaries of religious sensibility, but we have also furnished the impregnable storehouse of superstition, sometimes gracious, sometimes desperately cruel and hurtful to our race. No one noticed this, but I hold fast to it.... March 8. ... To Symphony Concert in afternoon, which I enjoyed but little, the music being of the multi-muddle order so much in vogue just now. An air of Haydn's sounded like a sentence of revelation in a chatter.. It may have been after this concert that she wrote these lines, found in one of her notebooks:--Such ugly noises never in my life My ears endured, such hideous fiddle-strife. A dozen street bands playing different tunes, A choir of chimney sweeps with various runes, The horn that doth
January 3rd (search for this): chapter 29
ntment, exceedingly precious while shut up, but I thought also that the dear Lord would one day break these separate boxes, and that then their fragrance would fill the whole earth, which is His house. This is my first writing in this book. From this thought and the Be still, I may try to make two sermons. In afternoon came William Wesselhoeft, Sr., and prescribed entire quiet and rest for some days to come. Oh! I do long to be at work. January 9. To-day for the first time since January 3, I have opened a Greek book. I read in my Aeschylus [ Eumenides ] how Apollo orders the Furies to leave his shrine, to go where deeds of barbarity, tortures, and mutilations are practised. At this time she heard of her son's receiving from the Czar the cross of the Order of St. Stanislas. She writes to him:-- Goodness gracious me! Are you sure it is n't by mistake? Do you remember that you are my naughty little imp?... Well, well, it takes away my breath! Dearest Boy, my he
perience ought to pledge me to new and more active efforts to help others. In my mind I said, the obstacle to this is my natural inertia, my indolence; then the thought, God can overcome this indolence and give me increased power of service and zeal for it. Those present, I think, all considered the sermon and Communion as of special power and interest. It almost made me fear lest it should prove a swan song from the dear minister. Perhaps it is I, not he, who may soon depart. Later in April she was able to fulfil some lecture engagements in New York State with much enjoyment, but also much fatigue. After her return she felt for a little while as if it was about time for her to go, but her mind soon recovered its tone. Being gently reproved for giving a lecture and holding a reception on the same day, she said, That is perfectly proper: I gave and I received: I was scriptural and I was blessed. Asked on another occasion if it did not tire her to lecture,--Why, no! it is
Lombroso's theory seems to be that genius, almost equally with insanity, is a result of degeneration.... March 1. The first day of spring, though in this climate this is a wintry month. I am thankful to have got on so far in this, my eighty-second year. My greatest trouble is that I use so poorly the precious time spared to me. Latterly I have been saying to myself, Can you not see that the drama is played out? This partly because my children wish me to give up public speaking. March 4.... To New England Woman's Club; first time this year, to my great regret and loss. I was cordially welcomed.... A thought suddenly came to me, namely, that the liberal education of women would give the death-blow to superstition. I said, We women have been the depositaries of religious sensibility, but we have also furnished the impregnable storehouse of superstition, sometimes gracious, sometimes desperately cruel and hurtful to our race. No one noticed this, but I hold fast to it....
March 17th (search for this): chapter 29
ddle-strife. A dozen street bands playing different tunes, A choir of chimney sweeps with various runes, The horn that doth to farmer's dinner call, The Chinese gong that serves in wealthier hall, The hammer, scrub brush, and beseeching broom, While here and there the guns of freedom boom, “Tzing! bang! this soul is saved!” “Clang! clang! it is n't!” And mich and dich and ich and sich and sisn't! Five dollar bills the nauseous treat secured, But what can pay the public that endured? March 17. Before lying down for a needed rest, I must record the wonderful reception given to-day to Jack Elliott's ceiling. The Triumph of Time, at the Public Library. The day was fine, clear sunlight. Many friends congratulated me, and some strangers. Vinton, the artist, Annie Blake, Ellen Dixey were enthusiastic in their commendation of the work, as were many others. I saw my old friend, Lizzie Agassiz, my cousin Mary Robeson and her daughter, and others too numerous to mention.... This I
January 7th (search for this): chapter 29
of the spiral can save us. We must make the round, but we may make it with an upward inclination. Let there be light! is sometimes said in accents so emphatic, that the universe remembers and cannot forget it. We carry our problems slowly forward. With all the ups and downs of every age, humanity constantly rises. Individuals may preserve all its early delusions, commit all its primitive crimes; but to the body of civilized mankind, the return to barbarism is impossible. J. W. H. January 7. I have had a morning of visioning, lying in bed. Be still and know that I am God, seemed to be my sentence. I thought of the Magdalen's box of spikenard, whose odor, when the box was broken, filled the house. The separate religious convictions of the sects seemed to me like so many boxes of ointment, exceedingly precious while shut up, but I thought also that the dear Lord would one day break these separate boxes, and that then their fragrance would fill the whole earth, which is His ho
January 9th (search for this): chapter 29
sects seemed to me like so many boxes of ointment, exceedingly precious while shut up, but I thought also that the dear Lord would one day break these separate boxes, and that then their fragrance would fill the whole earth, which is His house. This is my first writing in this book. From this thought and the Be still, I may try to make two sermons. In afternoon came William Wesselhoeft, Sr., and prescribed entire quiet and rest for some days to come. Oh! I do long to be at work. January 9. To-day for the first time since January 3, I have opened a Greek book. I read in my Aeschylus [ Eumenides ] how Apollo orders the Furies to leave his shrine, to go where deeds of barbarity, tortures, and mutilations are practised. At this time she heard of her son's receiving from the Czar the cross of the Order of St. Stanislas. She writes to him:-- Goodness gracious me! Are you sure it is n't by mistake? Do you remember that you are my naughty little imp?... Well, well, i
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