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, attributed to me by such speakers, but I know that I love the Club and love the world of my own time, so far as I know it. They called me Queen and kissed my hand. When I came home I fell in spirit before the feet of the dear God, thanking Him for the regard shown me, and praying that it might not for one moment make me vain. I read my translation of Horace's ode, Quis Desiderio, and it really seemed to suit the mention made by Mrs. Cheney of our departed members, praecipue, Dr. Zack; Dr. Hoder [?] of England was there, and ex-Governor Long and T. W. Higginson, also Agnes Irwin. It was a great time. July 5.... I wrote to Ethel V. Partridge, Omaha, a high-school student: Get all the education that you can. Cultivate habits of studious thought with all that books can teach. The fulfilment of the nearest duty gives the best education. I fear that I have come to know this by doing the exact opposite, i.e., neglecting much of the nearest duty in the pursuit of an intellectual wi
Sarah Jewett (search for this): chapter 29
Fields after church. Heard a very inspiring sermon from Samuel A. Eliot. This young man has a very noble bearing and a stringent way of presenting truth. He has that vital religious power which is rare and most precious. Before he had spoken I had been asking in my mind, how can we make the past present to us? The Easter service and Lent also seem intended to do this, but our imaginations droop and lag behind our desires... April 2. ... Went in the evening to see Ren-Hur with kind Sarah Jewett — her treat, as was my attendance at the opera. The play was altogether spectacular, but very good in that line.... April 3.... Went to the celebration of E. E. Hale's eightieth birthday, in which the community largely participated. Senator Hoar was the orator and spoke finely.... Hale's response was manly, cheery, and devout. He has certainly done much good work, and has suggested many good things. April 12. Lunch with Mrs. Wheelwright. I found Agnes Repplier very agreeable.
rous warfare waging. Here's to Teddy! Safe and steady, Loved by every section! South and North Will hurry forth To hasten his election. 1904. On September 12, a notice of the death of William Allen Butler is pasted in the Diary. Below it she writes:-- A pleasant man. I met him at the Hazeltines' in Rome in 1898 and 1899. His poem [Nothing to wear] was claimed by one or two people. I met his father [a Cabinet Minister] at a dinner at the Bancrofts' in New York, at which ex-President Van Buren was also present, and W. M. Thackeray, who said to me across the table that Browning's How they brought the good news was a good jingle. On the 29th she spoke at a meeting of the New England Woman's Club in memory of Dr. Zakrzewska, and records her final words:-- I pray God earnestly that we women may never go back from the ground which has been gained for us by our noble pioneers and leaders. I pray that these bright stars of merit, set in our human firmament, may shine up
Agnes Irwin (search for this): chapter 29
rld of my own time, so far as I know it. They called me Queen and kissed my hand. When I came home I fell in spirit before the feet of the dear God, thanking Him for the regard shown me, and praying that it might not for one moment make me vain. I read my translation of Horace's ode, Quis Desiderio, and it really seemed to suit the mention made by Mrs. Cheney of our departed members, praecipue, Dr. Zack; Dr. Hoder [?] of England was there, and ex-Governor Long and T. W. Higginson, also Agnes Irwin. It was a great time. July 5.... I wrote to Ethel V. Partridge, Omaha, a high-school student: Get all the education that you can. Cultivate habits of studious thought with all that books can teach. The fulfilment of the nearest duty gives the best education. I fear that I have come to know this by doing the exact opposite, i.e., neglecting much of the nearest duty in the pursuit of an intellectual wisdom which I have not attained.... Maud and Florence were both away in the early
at the dear Lord would one day break these separate boxes, and that then their fragrance would fill the whole earth, which is His house. This is my first writing in this book. From this thought and the Be still, I may try to make two sermons. In afternoon came William Wesselhoeft, Sr., and prescribed entire quiet and rest for some days to come. Oh! I do long to be at work. January 9. To-day for the first time since January 3, I have opened a Greek book. I read in my Aeschylus [ Eumenides ] how Apollo orders the Furies to leave his shrine, to go where deeds of barbarity, tortures, and mutilations are practised. At this time she heard of her son's receiving from the Czar the cross of the Order of St. Stanislas. She writes to him:-- Goodness gracious me! Are you sure it is n't by mistake? Do you remember that you are my naughty little imp?... Well, well, it takes away my breath! Dearest Boy, my heart is lifted up with gratitude. If your father were only here,
Battle Hymn (search for this): chapter 29
ck to us to-day, and we see his radiant smile as he led her forward. It is only the older ones among us, he said, who have seen Dr. Howe, but there are hundreds here who will want to tell their children that they have seen the author of the Battle Hymn of the Republic. Part of her word was as follows:-- We have listened to-day to very heroic memories; it almost took away our breath to think that such things were done in the last century. I feel very grateful to the pupils and gradua This was a very distinguished honor. The conversation was rather literary. The President admires Emerson's poems, and also Longfellow and Sienkiewicz. He paid me the compliment of saying that Kipling alone had understood the meaning of my Battle Hymn, and that he admired him therefor. Wister proposed the baby's health, and I recited a quatrain which came to me early this morning. Here it is:--Roses are the gift of God, Laurels are the gift of fame; Add the beauty of thy life To the glory
William Allen Butler (search for this): chapter 29
on, Undismayed explorer; Challenge dares him, Pullman bears him Swifter than Aurora. Here's to Teddy! Let no eddy Block the onward current. Him we trust, And guard we must From schemes to sight abhorrent. When the tuba Called to Cuba Where the fight was raging, Rough and ready Riders led he, Valorous warfare waging. Here's to Teddy! Safe and steady, Loved by every section! South and North Will hurry forth To hasten his election. 1904. On September 12, a notice of the death of William Allen Butler is pasted in the Diary. Below it she writes:-- A pleasant man. I met him at the Hazeltines' in Rome in 1898 and 1899. His poem [Nothing to wear] was claimed by one or two people. I met his father [a Cabinet Minister] at a dinner at the Bancrofts' in New York, at which ex-President Van Buren was also present, and W. M. Thackeray, who said to me across the table that Browning's How they brought the good news was a good jingle. On the 29th she spoke at a meeting of the New En
f her great pleasures, and she looked forward eagerly to the meetings, delighted to hear and to use the beautiful speech she had loved since childhood. February 22. The new club, Il Circolo Italiano, met at our house. Count Campello had asked me to say a few words, so I prepared a very little screed in Italian, not daring to trust myself to speak extempore in this language. We had a large attendance; I thought one hundred were present. My bit was well received, and the lecture by Professor Speranza, of New York, was very interesting, though rather difficult to follow. The theme was D'Annunzio's dramas, from which he gave some quotations and many characterizations. He relegates D'Annunzio to the Renaissance when Virtue had no real moral significance. Compared him with Ibsen. The occasion was exceedingly pleasant. To Laura I had hoped to go to church to-day, but my Maud and your Julia decided against it, and so I am having the day at home. It is just noon by my dial, and
Mabel Loomis Todd (search for this): chapter 29
sical strength. I said, He bleeds at every pore. I used to say this of myself with regard to ordinary social life. Went to the Club, where was made to preside. Todd and Todkinee Professor Todd, of Amherst, and his wife, Mabel Loomis Todd. both spoke excellently. Then to Symphony Concert to hear Kreisler and the Pastoral SyProfessor Todd, of Amherst, and his wife, Mabel Loomis Todd. both spoke excellently. Then to Symphony Concert to hear Kreisler and the Pastoral Symphony. February 16.... The Philosophy meeting and Griggs's lecture revived in me the remembrance of my philosophic studies and attempts of thirty-five years ago, and I determined to endeavor to revise them and to publish them in some shape. Have thought a good deal this morning of this cream of genius in which the fervent heaMabel Loomis Todd. both spoke excellently. Then to Symphony Concert to hear Kreisler and the Pastoral Symphony. February 16.... The Philosophy meeting and Griggs's lecture revived in me the remembrance of my philosophic studies and attempts of thirty-five years ago, and I determined to endeavor to revise them and to publish them in some shape. Have thought a good deal this morning of this cream of genius in which the fervent heat of youth fuses conviction and imagination and gives the world its great masters and masterpieces. It cannot outlast the length of human life of which it is the poetry. Age follows it with slow philosophy, but can only strengthen the outposts which youth has gained with daring flight. Both are divinely ordained and most blessed
this beautiful occasion. But the service and talk about the baby's being born in sin, etc., etc., seemed to me very inconsistent with Christ's saying that he who would enter into the Kingdom of Heaven must become as a little child. He also said, of such is the kingdom of heaven. She had a high admiration for Colonel Roosevelt, and a regard so warm that she would never allow any adverse criticism of him in her presence. The following verses express this feeling:-- Here's to Teddy, Blythe and ready, Fit for each occasion! Who as he Acceptably Can represent the Nation? Neither ocean Binds his motion, Undismayed explorer; Challenge dares him, Pullman bears him Swifter than Aurora. Here's to Teddy! Let no eddy Block the onward current. Him we trust, And guard we must From schemes to sight abhorrent. When the tuba Called to Cuba Where the fight was raging, Rough and ready Riders led he, Valorous warfare waging. Here's to Teddy! Safe and steady, Loved by every section! South
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