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ught also that the dear Lord would one day break these separate boxes, and that then their fragrance would fill the whole earth, which is His house. This is my first writing in this book. From this thought and the Be still, I may try to make two sermons. In afternoon came William Wesselhoeft, Sr., and prescribed entire quiet and rest for some days to come. Oh! I do long to be at work. January 9. To-day for the first time since January 3, I have opened a Greek book. I read in my Aeschylus [ Eumenides ] how Apollo orders the Furies to leave his shrine, to go where deeds of barbarity, tortures, and mutilations are practised. At this time she heard of her son's receiving from the Czar the cross of the Order of St. Stanislas. She writes to him:-- Goodness gracious me! Are you sure it is n't by mistake? Do you remember that you are my naughty little imp?... Well, well, it takes away my breath! Dearest Boy, my heart is lifted up with gratitude. If your father were
J. W. Howe (search for this): chapter 29
H. Perkins. The occasion was to me one of solemn joy and thankfulness. Senator Hoar presided with beautiful grace, preluding with some lovely reminiscences of Dr. Howe's visit to his office in Worcester, Massachusetts, when he, Hoar, was a young lawyer. Sanborn and Manatt excelled themselves, Humphreys did very well. Hoar req Senator Hoar's words come back to us to-day, and we see his radiant smile as he led her forward. It is only the older ones among us, he said, who have seen Dr. Howe, but there are hundreds here who will want to tell their children that they have seen the author of the Battle Hymn of the Republic. Part of her word was as fabout Wordsworth. I hunted up some verses written about him in my early enthusiasm, probably in 1840 or 1841. This I read and then told of my visit to him with Dr. Howe and the unpleasantness of the experience. Spoke also of the reaction in England against the morbid discontent which is so prominent and powerful in much of Byro
Frank Batcheller (search for this): chapter 29
ow you had taken it! But-how did you get along without a dictionary? The elder looked her surprise. I never use a word whose meaning I do not know! But the spelling? There was no answer to this, save a whimsical shrug of the shoulders. November 11. The day of the celebration of dear Chev's one hundredth birthday. Before starting for the Temple I received three beautiful gifts of flowers, a great bunch of white roses from Lizzie Agassiz, a lovely bouquet of violets from Mrs. Frank Batcheller, and some superb chrysanthemums from Mrs. George H. Perkins. The occasion was to me one of solemn joy and thankfulness. Senator Hoar presided with beautiful grace, preluding with some lovely reminiscences of Dr. Howe's visit to his office in Worcester, Massachusetts, when he, Hoar, was a young lawyer. Sanborn and Manatt excelled themselves, Humphreys did very well. Hoar requested me to stand up and say a few words, which I did, he introducing me in a very felicitous manner. I w
ary 13.... Felt greatly discouraged at first waking. It seemed impossible for me to make a first move under so many responsibilities. A sudden light came into my soul at the thought that God will help me in any good undertaking, and with this there came an inkling of first steps to be taken with regard to Sig. Leoni's parchment. That is, to have it bought by some public society. I went to work again on my prize poem, with better success than hitherto ... February 14. Philosophy at Mrs. Bullard's.... Sent off my prize poem with scarcely any hope of its obtaining or indeed deserving the prize, but Mar An editor. has promised to pay me something for it in any case, and I was bound to try for the object, namely, a good civic poem . . February 15.... A day of great pleasure, profit and fatigue ... Griggs's lecture.... The address on Erasmus and Luther was very inspiring. Griggs is in the full tide of youthful inspiration and gives himself to his audience without stint. He di
the green parlor with Margaret Deland and dear Maud. On August 24 she writes:-- This day has been devoted to a family function of great interest, namely, the christening of Daisy and Wintie's boy baby, Theodore Ward, the President Theodore Roosevelt. himself standing godfather. Jack Elliott and I were on hand in good time, both of us in our best attire. We found a very chosen company, the Sydney Websters, Owen Wister, Senator Lodge and wife, the latter standing as godmother. Mr. Diman, of the School, St. George's, Newport. officiated, Parson Stone being ill. The President made his response quite audibly. The Chanler children looked lovely, and the baby as dear as a baby can look. His godfather gave him a beautiful silver bowl lined with gold. I gave a silver porringer, Maud a rattle with silver bells; lunch followed. President Roosevelt took me in to the table and seated me on his right. This was a very distinguished honor. The conversation was rather literary.
Julia Richards (search for this): chapter 29
ell. Hoar requested me to stand up and say a few words, which I did, he introducing me in a very felicitous manner. I was glad to say my word, for my heart was deeply touched. With me on the platform were my dear children and Jack Hall and Julia Richards; Anagnos, of course; the music very good. Senator Hoar's words come back to us to-day, and we see his radiant smile as he led her forward. It is only the older ones among us, he said, who have seen Dr. Howe, but there are hundreds here ebruary 21.... My dearest Maud left by 1 P. M. train to sail for Europe to-morrow. I could not go to the hearing. Was on hand to think of small details which might have been overlooked. Gave them my fountain pen, to Jack's great pleasure. Julia Richards came to take care of me. I suffered extreme depression in coming back to the empty house, every corner of which is so identified with Maud's sweet and powerful presence. The pain of losing her, even for a short time, seemed intolerable. I w
ipinos. This seemed like the Millennium. It is the enlargement of religious sympathy; not, as some may think, the progress of critical indifferentism. During this morning's service my desire to speak to prisoners reasserted itself strongly; also my thought of one of my sermons which I wish to write. One should be to the text: The glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ, the reflection of divine glory in God's saints, like the reflection of the sun's light in the planets. Another about Adam being placed in Eden to tend the flowers and water them. This should concern our office in the land of our birth, into which we are born to love and serve our country. Will speak of the self-banished Americans, Hale's Man without a Country, etc. This day has been so full of thought and suggestion that I hardly know how to let it go. I pray that it may bear some fruit in my life, what is left of it. May 24. The annual Club luncheon in honor of my birthday. I felt almost overwhelmed by th
Robert C. Winthrop (search for this): chapter 29
om the ground which has been gained for us by our noble pioneers and leaders. I pray that these bright stars of merit, set in our human firmament, may shine upon us and lead us to better and better love and service for God and man. In the afternoon to hear reports of delegates to Biennial at Los Angeles. These were very interesting, but the activity shown made me feel my age, and its one great infirmity, loss of power of locomotion. I felt somehow the truth of the line which Mr. Robert C. Winthrop once quoted to me:-- Superfluous lags the veteran on the stage. Yet a few days later she writes:-- I had this morning so strong a feeling of the goodness of the divine Parent in the experience of my life, especially of its most trying period, that I had to cry out, What shall I, who have received so much, give in return? I felt that I must only show that forbearance and forgiveness to others which the ever blessed One has shown to me. My own family does not call for this.
G. Gordon Byron (search for this): chapter 29
ry remarkable work, and one which ought to remain in this country. February 11. Dreamed of an interview with a female pope. I had to go to Alliance Meeting to speak about Wordsworth. I hunted up some verses written about him in my early enthusiasm, probably in 1840 or 1841. This I read and then told of my visit to him with Dr. Howe and the unpleasantness of the experience. Spoke also of the reaction in England against the morbid discontent which is so prominent and powerful in much of Byron's poetry.... February 12. ... In my dream of yesterday morning the woman pope and I were on very friendly terms. I asked on leaving whether I might kiss her hand. She said, You may kiss my hand. I found it fat and far from beautiful. As I left her, methought that her countenance relaxed and she looked like a tired old woman. In my dream I thought, How like this is to what Pope Leo would do. February 13.... Felt greatly discouraged at first waking. It seemed impossible for me to m
Larz Anderson (search for this): chapter 29
Lizzie Agassiz, my cousin Mary Robeson and her daughter, and others too numerous to mention.... This I consider a day of great honor for my family. .. .Deo gratias for this as well as for my son's decoration. March 31.... Had a sort of vision in church of Moses and Christ, the mighty breath of the prophets reaching over many and dark ages to our own time, with power growing instead of diminishing. When I say a vision, I mean a vivid thought and mind picture. April 3. Have writ to Larz Anderson, telling him where to find the quotation from Horace which I gave him for a motto to his automobile, Ocior Euro. Sanborn found it for me and sent it by postal. It must have been more than thirty years since dear Brother Sam showed it to me. .. . April 7. A really inspired sermon from C. G. A., The power of an unending life. . .. The Communion which followed was to me almost miraculous. Mr. Ames called it a festival of commemoration, and it brought me a mind vision of the many depar
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