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like the Millennium. It is the enlargement of religious sympathy; not, as some may think, the progress of critical indifferentism. During this morning's service my desire to speak to prisoners reasserted itself strongly; also my thought of one of my sermons which I wish to write. One should be to the text: The glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ, the reflection of divine glory in God's saints, like the reflection of the sun's light in the planets. Another about Adam being placed in Eden to tend the flowers and water them. This should concern our office in the land of our birth, into which we are born to love and serve our country. Will speak of the self-banished Americans, Hale's Man without a Country, etc. This day has been so full of thought and suggestion that I hardly know how to let it go. I pray that it may bear some fruit in my life, what is left of it. May 24. The annual Club luncheon in honor of my birthday. I felt almost overwhelmed by the great attention sho
Ednah Cheney (search for this): chapter 29
self.... I don't find in myself this charm, this goodness, attributed to me by such speakers, but I know that I love the Club and love the world of my own time, so far as I know it. They called me Queen and kissed my hand. When I came home I fell in spirit before the feet of the dear God, thanking Him for the regard shown me, and praying that it might not for one moment make me vain. I read my translation of Horace's ode, Quis Desiderio, and it really seemed to suit the mention made by Mrs. Cheney of our departed members, praecipue, Dr. Zack; Dr. Hoder [?] of England was there, and ex-Governor Long and T. W. Higginson, also Agnes Irwin. It was a great time. July 5.... I wrote to Ethel V. Partridge, Omaha, a high-school student: Get all the education that you can. Cultivate habits of studious thought with all that books can teach. The fulfilment of the nearest duty gives the best education. I fear that I have come to know this by doing the exact opposite, i.e., neglecting much
ok ill with rheumatism. I made my bed, turning the mattress, and put my room generally to rights. When I lay down to take my usual obligato rest, a fit of verse came upon me, and I had to abbreviate my lie-down to write out my inspiration. The obligato rest l How she did detest it! She recognized the necessity of relaxing the tired nerves and muscles; she yielded, but never willingly. The noon hour would find her bending over her desk, writing for dear life, or plunged fathoms deep in Grote's Greece, or some other light and playful work. Daughter or granddaughter would appear, watch in hand, countenance steeled against persuasion. Time for your rest, dearest! The rapt face looks up, breaks into sunshine, melts into entreaty. Let me finish this note, this page; then I will go! Or it may be the sprite that looks out of the gray eyes. Get out! she says. Leave the room! I never saw you before! Finally she submits to the indignity of being tucked in for her nap; but ev
Charles Albert (search for this): chapter 29
man still in the prime of life, with exquisite manners, as much at home in our simplicity as he doubtless is in scenes of luxury and magnificence. Daisy Chanler drove out for afternoon tea, at my request, and made herself charming. After her came Emily Ladenberg, who also made a pleasing impression. Our guest played on the piano and joined in our evening whist. We were all delighted with him. After the Ambassador's departure she writes:-- He gave me an interesting account of King Charles Albert of Savoia. He is a man of powerful temperament, which we all felt; has had to do with Bismarck and Salisbury and all the great European politicians of his time. We were all sorry to see him depart. The Journal tells of many pleasures, among them a delightful morning in the green parlor with Margaret Deland and dear Maud. On August 24 she writes:-- This day has been devoted to a family function of great interest, namely, the christening of Daisy and Wintie's boy baby, Theo
Laura Bridgman (search for this): chapter 29
word was as follows:-- We have listened to-day to very heroic memories; it almost took away our breath to think that such things were done in the last century. I feel very grateful to the pupils and graduates of the Perkins Institution for the Blind who have planned this service in honor of my husband. It is a story that should be told from age to age to show what one good resolute believer in humanity was able to accomplish for the benefit of his race.... The path by which he led Laura Bridgman to the light has become one of the highways of education, and a number of children similarly afflicted are following it, to their endless enlargement and comfort. What an encouragement does this story give to the undertaking of good deeds! I thank those who are with us to-day for their sympathy and attention. I do this, not in the name of a handful of dust, dear and reverend as it is, that now rests in Mount Auburn, but in the name of a great heart which is with us to-day and which
William McKinley (search for this): chapter 29
the beautiful morning meeting and specially of the truth which comes down to us, mixed with so much rubbish of tradition. I spoke of the power of truth which burns all this accumulation of superstition and shines out firm and clear, so we may say that the myth crumbles but the majesty remains. She managed to do a good deal of writing this summer: wrote a number of screeds, some to order, some from inward leading: e.g., a paper on Girlhood seventy years ago, a poem on the death of President McKinley. October 5. A package came to-day from McClure's Syndicate. I thought it was my manuscript returned and rejected, and said, God give me strength not to cry. I opened it and found a typewritten copy of my paper on Girlhood, sent to me for correction in lieu of printer's proof. Wrote a little on my screed about Anarchy. Had a sudden thought that the sense and spirit of government is responsibility. October 6.... Wrote a poem on The Dead Century, which has in it some good lines
Frank B. Sanborn (search for this): chapter 29
owing instead of diminishing. When I say a vision, I mean a vivid thought and mind picture. April 3. Have writ to Larz Anderson, telling him where to find the quotation from Horace which I gave him for a motto to his automobile, Ocior Euro. Sanborn found it for me and sent it by postal. It must have been more than thirty years since dear Brother Sam showed it to me. .. . April 7. A really inspired sermon from C. G. A., The power of an unending life. . .. The Communion which followed wa The occasion was to me one of solemn joy and thankfulness. Senator Hoar presided with beautiful grace, preluding with some lovely reminiscences of Dr. Howe's visit to his office in Worcester, Massachusetts, when he, Hoar, was a young lawyer. Sanborn and Manatt excelled themselves, Humphreys did very well. Hoar requested me to stand up and say a few words, which I did, he introducing me in a very felicitous manner. I was glad to say my word, for my heart was deeply touched. With me on the
George W. De Long (search for this): chapter 29
know that I love the Club and love the world of my own time, so far as I know it. They called me Queen and kissed my hand. When I came home I fell in spirit before the feet of the dear God, thanking Him for the regard shown me, and praying that it might not for one moment make me vain. I read my translation of Horace's ode, Quis Desiderio, and it really seemed to suit the mention made by Mrs. Cheney of our departed members, praecipue, Dr. Zack; Dr. Hoder [?] of England was there, and ex-Governor Long and T. W. Higginson, also Agnes Irwin. It was a great time. July 5.... I wrote to Ethel V. Partridge, Omaha, a high-school student: Get all the education that you can. Cultivate habits of studious thought with all that books can teach. The fulfilment of the nearest duty gives the best education. I fear that I have come to know this by doing the exact opposite, i.e., neglecting much of the nearest duty in the pursuit of an intellectual wisdom which I have not attained.... Maud a
Henryk Sienkiewicz (search for this): chapter 29
e being ill. The President made his response quite audibly. The Chanler children looked lovely, and the baby as dear as a baby can look. His godfather gave him a beautiful silver bowl lined with gold. I gave a silver porringer, Maud a rattle with silver bells; lunch followed. President Roosevelt took me in to the table and seated me on his right. This was a very distinguished honor. The conversation was rather literary. The President admires Emerson's poems, and also Longfellow and Sienkiewicz. He paid me the compliment of saying that Kipling alone had understood the meaning of my Battle Hymn, and that he admired him therefor. Wister proposed the baby's health, and I recited a quatrain which came to me early this morning. Here it is:--Roses are the gift of God, Laurels are the gift of fame; Add the beauty of thy life To the glory of thy name. I said, Two lines for the President and two for the baby ; the two first naturally for the President. As I sat waiting for the ce
still abide with those who work in its spirit. November 26. Thursday. A day of pleasant agitation from beginning to end. I tried to recognize in thought the many mercies of the year. My fortunate recoveries from illness, the great pleasures of study, friendly intercourse, thought and life generally. Our Thanksgiving dinner was at about 1.30 P. M., and was embellished by the traditional turkey, a fine one, to which David, Flossy, Maud, and I did justice. The Richards girls, Julia and Betty, and Chug Dr. Lawrence J. Henderson. and Jack Hall, flitted in and out, full of preparation for the evening event, the marriage of my dear Harry Hall to Alice Haskell. I found time to go over my screed for Maynard very carefully, rewriting a little of it and mailing it in the afternoon. In the late afternoon came Harry Hall and his best man, Tom McCready, to dine here and dress for the ceremony. Maud improvised a pleasant supper: we were eight at table. Went to the church in two ca
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