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Andrew Cabot (search for this): chapter 6
Bristol, England, in 1815. On his departure the house was taken possession of by the Committee of Correspondence. It was next used as a hospital for the men who were wounded in the battle of Bunker Hill, and in the field opposite this and the Fayerweather house those who died in these mansions, temporarily converted into hospitals, were buried. Elmwood then became for three weeks the headquarters for Benedict Arnold and his company of forty men from New Haven. In 1779 it was sold to Andrew Cabot, who eight years later resold the residence to Elbridge Gerry of Marblehead, a well-known patriot and one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. He afterwards served as governor of Massachusetts, and later still as vice-president of the United States. In 1818 the estate was purchased of Mr. Gerry's widow by Rev. Charles Lowell, who was pastor of the West Church in Cambridge for over forty years. A year later his youngest and most distinguished son, James Russell Lowell, wa
Nathan Dane (search for this): chapter 6
d, arriving the second of July at Watertown, where the Provincial Congress of Massachusetts was in session, by which body he was warmly greeted. He then proceeded to the quarters assigned to him in Cambridge. As he approached the camp of the army which occupied about the site of the present common, he was greeted with shouts and the firing of artillery. Congress ordered that all the rooms but one in the house of the president of Harvard College, now standing on Massachusetts avenue between Dane and Boylston Halls and known as the Wadsworth house, should be prepared for the use of General Washington and of General Lee who accompanied him. On the morning of the next day, July 3, the army being drawn up on the com- mon, Washington formally took command under the wide-spreading branches of the venerable tree which will always be associated with this event. In a very short time Washington left the president's house, probably because he considered it too near Boston for safety, as a sh
Benedict Arnold (search for this): chapter 6
omas Oliver. He left Cambridge immediately and never returned. He died in exile at Bristol, England, in 1815. On his departure the house was taken possession of by the Committee of Correspondence. It was next used as a hospital for the men who were wounded in the battle of Bunker Hill, and in the field opposite this and the Fayerweather house those who died in these mansions, temporarily converted into hospitals, were buried. Elmwood then became for three weeks the headquarters for Benedict Arnold and his company of forty men from New Haven. In 1779 it was sold to Andrew Cabot, who eight years later resold the residence to Elbridge Gerry of Marblehead, a well-known patriot and one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. He afterwards served as governor of Massachusetts, and later still as vice-president of the United States. In 1818 the estate was purchased of Mr. Gerry's widow by Rev. Charles Lowell, who was pastor of the West Church in Cambridge for over forty
Charles Lowell (search for this): chapter 6
uried. Elmwood then became for three weeks the headquarters for Benedict Arnold and his company of forty men from New Haven. In 1779 it was sold to Andrew Cabot, who eight years later resold the residence to Elbridge Gerry of Marblehead, a well-known patriot and one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. He afterwards served as governor of Massachusetts, and later still as vice-president of the United States. In 1818 the estate was purchased of Mr. Gerry's widow by Rev. Charles Lowell, who was pastor of the West Church in Cambridge for over forty years. A year later his youngest and most distinguished son, James Russell Lowell, was born there. During the life of Rev. Mr. Lowell both sides of Elmwood avenue were bordered by hedges of lilac and other shrubs which grew in great luxuriance. He wished it to be kept in this state of nature, as it was a reminder to him of the lanes in England. All who have read the letters of James Russell Lowell, edited by Charles Eli
Joseph Lee (search for this): chapter 6
red that all the rooms but one in the house of the president of Harvard College, now standing on Massachusetts avenue between Dane and Boylston Halls and known as the Wadsworth house, should be prepared for the use of General Washington and of General Lee who accompanied him. On the morning of the next day, July 3, the army being drawn up on the com- mon, Washington formally took command under the wide-spreading branches of the venerable tree which will always be associated with this event. most substantial manner, the partitions between the rooms being a foot thick, and the depth of the outer walls is shown by the wide window seats. The walls of some of the rooms were covered with landscape paper. It was afterwards owned by Judge Joseph Lee. On the occupation of Cambridge by the troops he removed to Boston where he remained during the siege of that town, but after the siege was raised he returned to Cambridge and was allowed to live in his residence on condition that he would
Thomas Mifflin (search for this): chapter 6
e from their country. Their estates were confiscated and leased by the Committee of Correspondence. Taking the houses in the order in which they are located, commencing at the east end of the street, we come first to the house on the left hand side of Brattle street next to the University Press, now occupied by the Social Union. It was built about 1740 by Brigadier-General William Brattle of His Majesty's army. When General Brattle was obliged to leave his house, it was used by Col. Thomas Mifflin, quartermaster of the American army. The mansion was situated about in the centre of the extensive grounds which stretched from the present Brattle square to the Vassall estate. They were so beautifully laid out that they were said to be the finest in New England, with their shaded walks and lawns reaching to the banks of the Charles. Here were held a number of receptions while the army was in Cambridge. One was given in honor of Mrs. John Adams, and at another Mr. Adams was prese
Samuel Batchelder (search for this): chapter 6
s have been shown in one of the rooms where it is said a slave was killed by a member of this family; but there is no evidence of the truth of the legend. On the contrary it is on record that Madame Vassall paid twenty pounds to free the child of their slave Tony. After the war this estate was purchased by Nathaniel Tracy of Newburyport, and later, in 1792, it was bought by Andrew Cragie who also owned the Longfellow house. About fifty years afterwards it came into the possession of Samuel Batchelder, the father of the present proprietors. The Longfellow or Craigie house, the third of these notable places, stands nearly opposite the Batchelder estate. It was built in 1759 by Colonel John Vassall, a brother of Colonel Henry Vassall whose home we have just been considering. After he was obliged to vacate these premises, a regiment from Marblehead commanded by Colonel Glover occupied the mansion. This is perhaps the most interesting of the houses in Tory Row, as with it are asso
Charles Eliot Norton (search for this): chapter 6
rles Lowell, who was pastor of the West Church in Cambridge for over forty years. A year later his youngest and most distinguished son, James Russell Lowell, was born there. During the life of Rev. Mr. Lowell both sides of Elmwood avenue were bordered by hedges of lilac and other shrubs which grew in great luxuriance. He wished it to be kept in this state of nature, as it was a reminder to him of the lanes in England. All who have read the letters of James Russell Lowell, edited by Charles Eliot Norton, will recall the love which tile poet felt for this mansion, his birthplace. and its beautiful grounds, where doubtless he received many of his poetic inspirations; and will feel, for the sake of the author whose personality will ever hallow this spot, an added interest in this, the last of the houses which constituted our historic Tory Row. Waifse. All through the golden haze Leaves were drifting and falling. All through the mellow days Boughs were bending and calling To their
George Washington (search for this): chapter 6
the world of letters. As the headquarters of General Washington it will always hold a foremost place among thorth house, should be prepared for the use of General Washington and of General Lee who accompanied him. On thassociated with this event. In a very short time Washington left the president's house, probably because he cout nine months later. How many troubled hours Washington spent under this roof! Prominent among his causeknowledge of this be kept from the invaders. Mrs. Washington arrived in Cambridge from her home in Virginia, the southeast room on the first floor, which General Washington used as his study; the room over this, which he left as one enters (the southwest), in which Mrs. Washington received her friends. This is now called the L and the wood-work is the same as in 1775. General Washington's appearance was very stately in his blue andt in the house on account of its connection with Washington is overshadowed by the associations with our much
Joseph E. Worcester (search for this): chapter 6
East Cambridge, the bridge there still being known by his name. He became involved financially through his speculations, andd during the last years of his life he was virtually a prisoner in his own house. He was liable to arrest for debt if he was seen outside his home on week days, though on Sundays he could go out with no fear of molestation. After his death his widow continued to reside here, helping out her income by letting rooms to students; and Edward Everett, Jared Sparks, Joseph E. Worcester and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow among others occupied rooms in the venerable mansion at this time. Soon after Mrs. Craigie's death in 1843, the estate was purchased by Mr. Longfellow. Since then the interest in the house on account of its connection with Washington is overshadowed by the associations with our much loved and greatly honored poet. He first occupied the southeast chamber, and it was in this room that all of his poems from 1837 to 1845 were written. Later the room b
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