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Dallas, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
bridge. On the morning of April 3, 1865, he received from the Mayor of Richmond a formal surrender of the city, led his squadron within the walls, and displayed the Stars and Stripes upon the State House. Brevet Major. Charles J. Mills. Captains. Thomas H. Annable. Thomas O. Barri. Joseph H. Baxter. James B. Bell. George N. Bennett. Robert T. Bourne. John T. Burgess. Richard Gary. Charles H. Chapman. Joseph H. Clark. J. Warren Cotton. Lewis S. Dabney. Alexander J, Dallas. George H. Dana. James T. Davis. Horace Dexter. Edward G. Dyke. Charles W. Folsom. William H. Gertz. Joseph A. Hildreth. Arthur Hodges. George F. Holman. Henry A. Homer. Henry P. Hoppin. Samuel D. Hovey. William G. Howe. Alpheus Hyatt. William H. Jewell. Edward B. P. Kinsley. Leodegar M. Lipp. Roger S. Littlefield. Frederick A. Lull. John W. McGregor. Samuel McKeever. Robert R. Newell. William J. O'Brien. William Plumer. Josiah Porter. Thomas R. Robeso
Charles (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
20, Mr. Daniel Foxcroft spoken with to be sub-commissary in this expedition, and accepted. June 21, Capt. Gookin Sheriff of Middlesex, and son of Gen. Gookin. and Capt. Phips to be sent to for riding officers. June 22, Mr. Sheriff Gookin and Capt. Sam Mass. Arch., LXXI. 368.. Phips accepted to ride the circle for hastening the troops (Gookin commanded a company in this expedition). June 23, Lieut.-col. Goffe and Major Jonas Bond to provide quarters for the troops of the north of Charles River, appointed to rendezvous at Cambridge. Mass. Arch., LXXI. 806, 807. Col. Edmund Goffe submitted a memorial to Lieut.—gov. Dummer, in 1724, when the Province was engaged in a war with the Indians, representing that in the month of July last past, he was commissionated and appointed to be Colonel of all the forces in the western frontiers of Middlesex and Essex, together with the town of Brookfield, by his Honor the Lieutenant Governor, and that he had visited all the stations at gr
Roxbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
to Boston, May 20, 1644, being then styled Captain; he resided in Roxbury about years, but removed to Cambridge before April 9, 1648, when, ramingham; Lexington, 10; Lynn, 4; Medford, 2; Needham, 5; Newton; Roxbury; Salem, 1; Stow; Sudbury, 2; Watertown, 1; Woburn, 2. See FrothinAmerican army, of which the right wing was immediately extended to Roxbury, and the left, to Prospect and Winter Hills. General Ward establisand at several other places Several works were also constructed at Roxbury, and the British confined to Boston and Charlestown within the necWashington, the army was more fully organized. The right wing, at Roxbury, under the command of Major-general Ward, consisted of two brigade4; at different places,— Number One, Inman's House, &c., 3,460; at Roxbury, 3,795; at Dorchester, 814; at Sewall's Point, 400; at Cambridge Bton neck, south end of that town, as well as from the Americans at Roxbury, Cobble Hill, and Lechmere's Point at Cambridge. The position of
Brookfield, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
the Province was engaged in a war with the Indians, representing that in the month of July last past, he was commissionated and appointed to be Colonel of all the forces in the western frontiers of Middlesex and Essex, together with the town of Brookfield, by his Honor the Lieutenant Governor, and that he had visited all the stations at great personal expense, and at the hazard of his life; he reported the number of men now in the service of this Government in the towns following, viz.: Dunstable, 40; Dracut, 12; Almsbury, 10; Haverhill, 12; Groton, 14; Lancaster, 14; Turkey-Hills, 12; Rutland, 25; Brookfield, 10; total, 149. Ibid., LXXII. 169-172. At a later period, Rev. Ammi-Ruhamah Cutter (a Cambridge man), H. C. 1725, having been dismissed from his charge at North Yarmouth, served his country as Captain several years before his death, which occurred at Louisburg in March, 1746. Cutter Family, 55-59. The names of a few non-commissioned officers and privates also, during thes
Dana Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ck. Heath's Memoirs, p. 22. These works were extended, after the arrival of Washington, from Dorchester on the south, through Cambridge, to Mystic River on the north. In Cambridge a line of fortifications was constructed along the summit of Dana Hill, then called Butler's Hill, Probably so called because, in the first division of lands in Cambridge, lots on the northerly side of Main Street, extending from Dana Street somewhat beyond Hancock Street, were assigned to Richard Butler and Wittle outside of Cambridge bounds, not far from Union Square in Somerville. This served as a connecting link between the works on Prospect Hill, and the Cambridge lines which extended northwardly from the point where Broadway crosses the top of Dana Hill, and of which some vestiges still remain. Fort No. 2 was on the easterly side of Putnam Avenue, at its intersection with Franklin Street. It was in good condition a few years ago; but since Franklin Street was extended directly through it, a l
Brighton, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
s he ever maintained and avowed the highest sentiments of patriotism, so his conduct entirely cohered, and, actuated by this divine principle, entered the field of battle. And although he returned uncrowned with victorious bays, and his temples unadorned with laurel wreaths, yet doubtless he will be crowned with unfading honors in the unclouded regions of eternal day. Colonel Gardner's residence was near Union Square, in the southerly parish of Cambridge, which afterwards was the town of Brighton. On the day of Colonel Gardner's death, July 3d, General Washington assumed the command of the American Army, having arrived in Cambridge on the preceding day. Quarters were at first assigned to him in the President's house, erected in 1726, and still standing on Harvard Street, between Dane and Boylston Halls. The Provincial Congress, June 26, resolved, that the President's house in Cambridge, excepting one room reserved by the President for his own use, be taken, cleared, prepared, an
Stamford, Conn. (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ol. Rec., i. 75, 77.s These were the commanders of the incipient militia. Of Daniel Patrick, Winthrop says, This Captain was entertained by us out of Holland (where he was a common soldier of the Prince's guard) to exercise our men. We made him a captain, and maintained him. Savage's Winthrop, II. 151. He resided a short time in Watertown, but came to Cambridge before May 1, 1632, Ibid., i. 74. and remained here until Nov. 1637, when he removed to Ipswich, and subsequently to Stamford, Connecticut, where he was killed by a Dutchman in 1643. During his residence here, the tract of upland surrounded by marsh, on which the Powder Magazine stands at the foot of Magazine Street, was granted by the town to him; and since that time it has been known as Captain's Island. Thus, for five years, from 1632 to 1637, Cambridge was the Headquarters of one of the two principal military commanders. And when a more perfect organization of the militia was made, Dec. 13, 1636, the whole being
Lynn (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
terly border of Menotomy to their point of departure by Beech Street into the Milk Row Road, their passage was through a flame of fire. The provincials rallied from the towns in the vicinity The list of killed, wounded, and missing, gives the names of twenty-three towns, which, with their respective number of killed are as follows: Acton, 3; Bedford, 1; Beverly, 1; Billerica; Brookline, 1; Cambridge, 6; Charlestown, 2; Chelmsford; Concord; Danvers, 7; Dedham, 1; Framingham; Lexington, 10; Lynn, 4; Medford, 2; Needham, 5; Newton; Roxbury; Salem, 1; Stow; Sudbury, 2; Watertown, 1; Woburn, 2. See Frothingham's Siege of Boston, pp. 80, 81. Certainly some other towns, and probably many, besides these, were represented in this sanguinary conflict. even to as great a distance as Salem, and hung upon their rear and flanks, firing upon them from every advantageous point. The British loss, in this retreat, is reported to have been seventy-three killed, one hundred and seventy-four wounded,
Louisburg (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
rd of his life; he reported the number of men now in the service of this Government in the towns following, viz.: Dunstable, 40; Dracut, 12; Almsbury, 10; Haverhill, 12; Groton, 14; Lancaster, 14; Turkey-Hills, 12; Rutland, 25; Brookfield, 10; total, 149. Ibid., LXXII. 169-172. At a later period, Rev. Ammi-Ruhamah Cutter (a Cambridge man), H. C. 1725, having been dismissed from his charge at North Yarmouth, served his country as Captain several years before his death, which occurred at Louisburg in March, 1746. Cutter Family, 55-59. The names of a few non-commissioned officers and privates also, during these troublous times, have been preserved. Joseph Hastings was wounded and lost an eye in 1690. In the same year, among those who were engaged in the unfortunate expedition against Canada are found the names of John Andrew, William Blanchard, Nathaniel Bowman, Matthew Bridge, Daniel Champney, James Cutler, Edward Green, Stephen Hastings, Joseph Hicks, John Manning, John Peirc
Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ates, Sergt., Samll. Butterfield. Sergt., James Kittle, Sergt., Thos. Fillebrown, Corp., Belcher Hancock. Corp., Joshua Gamage, Drumr., Will. Bradish, Drumr., Joseph Ayers, John Batherick, Will. Bordman, Jr., Oliver Brown, Benj. Butterfield, Edmund Bowman, Will. Brewer, John Caldwell, Walter Coxs, Cox is the proper name. Samll. Coxs, Joseph Coxs, Solomon Cooper, Henry Dickson, Isaiah Dickson, John Dickson, John Evers, Ebenr Fisher, Stephen Frost, Jonathan Frost, David Frost, John Frost, Ebenr. Fessenden, Stephen Goddard, Benj. Goddard, Thos. Goddard, Nathaniel Goddard, Torry Hancock, Philemon Hastings, Thomas Hastings, Stephen Hastings, Will. Manning, Abel Moore, Alexander Nelson, John Phillips, Jr., Thomas Prentiss, Nathll. Prentice Daniel Prentice, Samll. Prentice, Israel Porter, Stephen Palmer, Jr., Joseph Palmer, James Stone, Robert Twadwell
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