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Nantasket (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
wards President of the College), who, with his associates, Col. Elisha Hutchinson and Col. Penn Townsend, received instructions from Governor Dudley, July 3, 1707, as joint commissioners for the superior command, conduct, rule and government of her majesty's forces on the expedition to Nova Scotia and L'Accadie. Mass. Arch., LXXI. 368. Andrew Belcher, previously of Cambridge, was Commissary five years before 1708. Ibid., p. 456. In the expedition against Port Royal, which sailed from Nantasket Sept. 18, 1710, Edmund Goffe was Lieut.-colonel of the regiment whereof William Tailer was Colonel and William Dudley was Major. Samuel Gookin (grandson of General Gookin) was a Lieutenant in the company commanded by Capt. Robert Handy. Ibid., p. 673. In the Minutes of Council, when raising troops for an expedition against Canada in 1711, are some memoranda concerning Cambridge men: June 20, Mr. Daniel Foxcroft spoken with to be sub-commissary in this expedition, and accepted. June 21
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ant colonell. Mass. Col. Rec., i. 187. Both were Cambridge men; the former had been Governor of Massachusetts, and was afterwards for many years Governor of Connecticut; the latter was one of the Assistants, and remained in office, both civil and military, until Nov. 17, 1638, when he departed this life. At the session of th Middlesex Court Files. Lieutenant Spencer was one of the corporate members of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, 1638-9, in which year he removed to Connecticut, where, as well as here, he was an active and useful civil officer. Both here and in Connecticut he was a Deputy in the General Court. Ensign Shepard returneConnecticut he was a Deputy in the General Court. Ensign Shepard returned to England with Captain Cooke, being excused by the General Court in October, 1645, from further attendance as a member, being to go for England. He was a Major in Cromwell's army, and very probably in Colonel Cooke's regiment. He is represented in Mitchell's Church Record, 1658, as then living in Ireland, where he probably die
Quincy (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
5College. Capt. John Cowls35College. Richard Montague, Adjt., Col. Woodbridge's Regt. and elsewhere, as accommodations could be found. The buildings of the College were taken possession of, and occupied as barracks, by the American Army. Quincy's Hist. Harvard University, II. 168. As early as May 1, 1775, the Committee of Safety Voted, That the quarter-master general be directed to clear that chamber in Stoughton College, occupied by S. Parsons Jr., for a printing office for Messrs. Have instruction at Concord, to which place a part of the library and apparatus was removed in November from Andover. On the 24th of June (1776), the students were again assembled within the College walls, after a dispersion of fourteen months. Quincy's Hist., II. 164-169. The Episcopal Church also was converted into barracks for the Connecticut troops. Frothingham's Hist. Siege of Boston, p. 132. It had previously been deserted by its owners, most of whom were adherents to the British gov
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
nization of the military force, Captain Gardner was elected Colonel of the First Middlesex Regiment, and his Lieutenant, Samuel Thatcher, was promoted to the office of Captain. On the memorable 19th of April, 1775, when the British troops landed at Lechmere's Point (East Cambridge), under cover of the night, crossed the marshes to the Milk Row Road (now Milk Street, Somerville), and marched through Beech Street Beech Street was then the only open passage-way between the Milk Row Road and North Avenue. Milk Street in Cambridge, from Milk Street in Somerville to North Avenue at Union Square, was not established as a highway until a much later day. and North Avenue to Menotomy, and thence to Lexington and Concord, Captain Thatcher and his company were among the foremost to rally for the public defence. There is a tradition that a British soldier, becoming sick, was left at Lechmere's Point, and sought relief at the solitary house then standing there; and that the occupant of the ho
Dedham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ston was far different. From the westerly border of Menotomy to their point of departure by Beech Street into the Milk Row Road, their passage was through a flame of fire. The provincials rallied from the towns in the vicinity The list of killed, wounded, and missing, gives the names of twenty-three towns, which, with their respective number of killed are as follows: Acton, 3; Bedford, 1; Beverly, 1; Billerica; Brookline, 1; Cambridge, 6; Charlestown, 2; Chelmsford; Concord; Danvers, 7; Dedham, 1; Framingham; Lexington, 10; Lynn, 4; Medford, 2; Needham, 5; Newton; Roxbury; Salem, 1; Stow; Sudbury, 2; Watertown, 1; Woburn, 2. See Frothingham's Siege of Boston, pp. 80, 81. Certainly some other towns, and probably many, besides these, were represented in this sanguinary conflict. even to as great a distance as Salem, and hung upon their rear and flanks, firing upon them from every advantageous point. The British loss, in this retreat, is reported to have been seventy-three killed,
Groton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
representing that in the month of July last past, he was commissionated and appointed to be Colonel of all the forces in the western frontiers of Middlesex and Essex, together with the town of Brookfield, by his Honor the Lieutenant Governor, and that he had visited all the stations at great personal expense, and at the hazard of his life; he reported the number of men now in the service of this Government in the towns following, viz.: Dunstable, 40; Dracut, 12; Almsbury, 10; Haverhill, 12; Groton, 14; Lancaster, 14; Turkey-Hills, 12; Rutland, 25; Brookfield, 10; total, 149. Ibid., LXXII. 169-172. At a later period, Rev. Ammi-Ruhamah Cutter (a Cambridge man), H. C. 1725, having been dismissed from his charge at North Yarmouth, served his country as Captain several years before his death, which occurred at Louisburg in March, 1746. Cutter Family, 55-59. The names of a few non-commissioned officers and privates also, during these troublous times, have been preserved. Joseph Has
Framingham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
different. From the westerly border of Menotomy to their point of departure by Beech Street into the Milk Row Road, their passage was through a flame of fire. The provincials rallied from the towns in the vicinity The list of killed, wounded, and missing, gives the names of twenty-three towns, which, with their respective number of killed are as follows: Acton, 3; Bedford, 1; Beverly, 1; Billerica; Brookline, 1; Cambridge, 6; Charlestown, 2; Chelmsford; Concord; Danvers, 7; Dedham, 1; Framingham; Lexington, 10; Lynn, 4; Medford, 2; Needham, 5; Newton; Roxbury; Salem, 1; Stow; Sudbury, 2; Watertown, 1; Woburn, 2. See Frothingham's Siege of Boston, pp. 80, 81. Certainly some other towns, and probably many, besides these, were represented in this sanguinary conflict. even to as great a distance as Salem, and hung upon their rear and flanks, firing upon them from every advantageous point. The British loss, in this retreat, is reported to have been seventy-three killed, one hundred a
Bedford, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
n too old to go into the conflict in which all the young men were actively engaged. But their retreat toward Boston was far different. From the westerly border of Menotomy to their point of departure by Beech Street into the Milk Row Road, their passage was through a flame of fire. The provincials rallied from the towns in the vicinity The list of killed, wounded, and missing, gives the names of twenty-three towns, which, with their respective number of killed are as follows: Acton, 3; Bedford, 1; Beverly, 1; Billerica; Brookline, 1; Cambridge, 6; Charlestown, 2; Chelmsford; Concord; Danvers, 7; Dedham, 1; Framingham; Lexington, 10; Lynn, 4; Medford, 2; Needham, 5; Newton; Roxbury; Salem, 1; Stow; Sudbury, 2; Watertown, 1; Woburn, 2. See Frothingham's Siege of Boston, pp. 80, 81. Certainly some other towns, and probably many, besides these, were represented in this sanguinary conflict. even to as great a distance as Salem, and hung upon their rear and flanks, firing upon them fr
North Yarmouth (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
Governor, and that he had visited all the stations at great personal expense, and at the hazard of his life; he reported the number of men now in the service of this Government in the towns following, viz.: Dunstable, 40; Dracut, 12; Almsbury, 10; Haverhill, 12; Groton, 14; Lancaster, 14; Turkey-Hills, 12; Rutland, 25; Brookfield, 10; total, 149. Ibid., LXXII. 169-172. At a later period, Rev. Ammi-Ruhamah Cutter (a Cambridge man), H. C. 1725, having been dismissed from his charge at North Yarmouth, served his country as Captain several years before his death, which occurred at Louisburg in March, 1746. Cutter Family, 55-59. The names of a few non-commissioned officers and privates also, during these troublous times, have been preserved. Joseph Hastings was wounded and lost an eye in 1690. In the same year, among those who were engaged in the unfortunate expedition against Canada are found the names of John Andrew, William Blanchard, Nathaniel Bowman, Matthew Bridge, Daniel C
Rutland, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
rsonal expense, and at the hazard of his life; he reported the number of men now in the service of this Government in the towns following, viz.: Dunstable, 40; Dracut, 12; Almsbury, 10; Haverhill, 12; Groton, 14; Lancaster, 14; Turkey-Hills, 12; Rutland, 25; Brookfield, 10; total, 149. Ibid., LXXII. 169-172. At a later period, Rev. Ammi-Ruhamah Cutter (a Cambridge man), H. C. 1725, having been dismissed from his charge at North Yarmouth, served his country as Captain several years before hirs elsewhere. The soldiers occupied barracks on Prospect and Winter Hills. Between 11 and 12 o'clock on the 5th of April, 1778, General Burgoyne left Cambridge for Rhode Island; and on the 15th a division of the Convention troops marched for Rutland, under escort of a detachment of militia, commanded by Major Read. Ibid., pp. 161, 162. The remainder of the Convention troops marched for Virginia, on the 10th and 11th of November, 1778, Ibid., p. 198. after having been prisoners of war
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