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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register. Search the whole document.

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Dorchester, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
Common, and at several other places Several works were also constructed at Roxbury, and the British confined to Boston and Charlestown within the neck. Heath's Memoirs, p. 22. These works were extended, after the arrival of Washington, from Dorchester on the south, through Cambridge, to Mystic River on the north. In Cambridge a line of fortifications was constructed along the summit of Dana Hill, then called Butler's Hill, Probably so called because, in the first division of lands in Cam's Headquarters were in the Inman house. Frothingham says that during the next winter the troops were accommodated in barracks thus: At Prospect Hill, 3,464; at different places,— Number One, Inman's House, &c., 3,460; at Roxbury, 3,795; at Dorchester, 814; at Sewall's Point, 400; at Cambridge Barracks, 640; at Winter Hill, 3,380; in the College, 640; in the New College, 640; in the Old College, 240; North Chapel, 160; total, 17,633; exclusive of private houses in Cambridge. Siege of Bost
Benjamin Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
omas Coe, John Cole, John Cole, Jr., Samuel Cole, Aaron Comstock. Joshua Converse, Joseph Cook, Daniel Cooper, John Craige, Samuel Cutter, Benjamin Darling, Edward Dickson, John Dickson, Jr., William Doty, Thomas Durant, Henry Evans, Edward Fillebrown, John Fillebrown, Richard Fillebrown, John Fowle, Simon Gardis. Samuel Gookin, Jr., Joseph Hamilton, Solomon Hancock, Cato Hanker, Joseph Hartwell, Elisha Hastings, William Hastings, Jason Hazard, Timothy Heath, Abraham Hill, Andrew Hill, Benjamin Hill, Daniel Hill, Zachariah Hill, Israel Hinds, Samuel Hinds, Aaron Hodges, Nathaniel Holden, Elisha Holmes, Daniel Hovey, Simon Howard, Jonathan Ingersol, Jonas Jackson, John Kidder, David Lamson, Edward Manning, William Marshall, John Mason, John Matthews, Thomas Mayhew, Francis Moore, Jr., William Moore, Christopher Mudgeon, John Mullett, John Nutting, Daniel Paine, Stephen Paine, Daniel Parkhurst, Thomas Peirce, Warren Perkins, Reuben Prentice, Addison Richardson, John Rickey, John Robbi
Lancaster, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
infirmities of body as age, is by this court released from all ordinary trainings. And he is to make such annual allowance to the military company as himself shall see meet. Middlesex Court Record. Ordinarily, five shillings per annum was required to be paid in consideration of such exemption, as in the case of Gilbert Crackbone, April 6, 1658, and Robert Parker and William Mann, October, 1658, Ibid. all Cambridge men. So also, June, 1659, William Kerley, Ibid. Kerley resided in Lancaster. aged about 76 years, is released from all ordinary trainings, paying 5s. per annum to the use of the military company in the town where he dwelleth. In the Middlesex Court Files of 1659 is preserved a document without date, entitled, Reasons, showing why old men of sixty years are not to train:— First. From the word of God, though not in express terms, yet by consequence, may be gathered, that if the Levites were to be dismissed at fifty years from their service at the tabernacle,
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ive number of killed are as follows: Acton, 3; Bedford, 1; Beverly, 1; Billerica; Brookline, 1; Cambridge, 6; Charlestown, 2; Chelmsford; Concord; Danvers, 7; Dedham, 1; Framingham; Lexington, 10; Lynn, 4; Medford, 2; Needham, 5; Newton; Roxbury; Salem, 1; Stow; Sudbury, 2; Watertown, 1; Woburn, 2. See Frothingham's Siege of Boston, pp. 80, 81. Certainly some other towns, and probably many, besides these, were represented in this sanguinary conflict. even to as great a distance as Salem, and hSalem, and hung upon their rear and flanks, firing upon them from every advantageous point. The British loss, in this retreat, is reported to have been seventy-three killed, one hundred and seventy-four wounded, and twenty-six missing,— the most of which were taken prisoners. Frothingham's Siege of Boston, p. 82. Of the provincials the loss was less, being forty-nine killed, thirty-nine wounded, and five missing. Ibid., p. 81. The place of residence of those who were killed is indicated in the prece
Halifax (Canada) (search for this): chapter 22
his associates, Col. Elisha Hutchinson and Col. Penn Townsend, received instructions from Governor Dudley, July 3, 1707, as joint commissioners for the superior command, conduct, rule and government of her majesty's forces on the expedition to Nova Scotia and L'Accadie. Mass. Arch., LXXI. 368. Andrew Belcher, previously of Cambridge, was Commissary five years before 1708. Ibid., p. 456. In the expedition against Port Royal, which sailed from Nantasket Sept. 18, 1710, Edmund Goffe was Lieuives in General Court assembled at Boston, December, 1763,— Humbly sheweth William Angier of Cambridge, that on the second day of November, A. D. 1759, he was Captain of a company in Col. Joseph Frye's Regiment, stationed at Fort Cumberland in Nova Scotia: that the Regiment appearing inclined to mutiny, and refusing to do duty because (they said) the time they enlisted for expired the day before; and as there was no troops arrived to relieve the Regiment, the Fort would undoubtedly fall into th
Fort Putnam (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
was carefully preserved by the Dana family, for many years, until by an arrangement with the owners, and at the joint expense of the City and the Commonwealth, it was restored in 1858 as nearly as possible to its original state, and enclosed by a substantial iron fence. The United States contributed three cannon, which were duly mounted. Let no unpatriotic hand destroy this revolutionary relic, now known as Fort Washington. A still more formidable fortress, at Lechmere's Point, called Fort Putnam, will be mentioned in another place. Immediately after the arrival of General Washington, the army was more fully organized. The right wing, at Roxbury, under the command of Major-general Ward, consisted of two brigades, commanded by Brigadier-generals Thomas and Spencer. The left wing, commanded by Major-general Lee, consisted of two brigades, under Brigadier-generals Sullivan and Greene. The centre, at Cambridge, commanded by Majoreral Putnam, consisted of two brigades; one under
Middlesex Court (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 22
colonel in Cromwell's army, and sacrificed his life in the service of the Commonwealth, being reported to be slain in the wars in Ireland in the year 1652. Middlesex Court Files. Lieutenant Spencer was one of the corporate members of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, 1638-9, in which year he removed to Connecticut, wh as age, is by this court released from all ordinary trainings. And he is to make such annual allowance to the military company as himself shall see meet. Middlesex Court Record. Ordinarily, five shillings per annum was required to be paid in consideration of such exemption, as in the case of Gilbert Crackbone, April 6, 1658, ace the last training day, although it was a warm day. So committing myself to your worships favor I rest your humble servant. Tho. SWOeTMAN. The 8 (8) 73. Middlesex Court Files. In 1689, the term of service had been shortened. All the inhabitants from sixteen to sixty years in each town are by the law and constant custom of th
Medford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
y-three towns, which, with their respective number of killed are as follows: Acton, 3; Bedford, 1; Beverly, 1; Billerica; Brookline, 1; Cambridge, 6; Charlestown, 2; Chelmsford; Concord; Danvers, 7; Dedham, 1; Framingham; Lexington, 10; Lynn, 4; Medford, 2; Needham, 5; Newton; Roxbury; Salem, 1; Stow; Sudbury, 2; Watertown, 1; Woburn, 2. See Frothingham's Siege of Boston, pp. 80, 81. Certainly some other towns, and probably many, besides these, were represented in this sanguinary conflict. evected, or the old one repaired does not distinctly appear. But, old or new, it is delineated on Marshal's Map as connecting the fortification on Lechmere's Point with Fort No. 3, and crossing Miller's River at or near the spot where the Gore (or Medford) Street Bridge was after wards built. For the next few days the approaches were carried on briskly, nearly to the top of the hill. On the 17th, the morning was foggy. A detachment of 300 men, under the direction of Gen. Putnam, broke ground on
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 22
White. James White. John Whiting. Andrew Whitney. Nathaniel R. Whitney. Oliver Whitney. Timothy Whitney. Francis Whittemore. Nathan Whittemore. Samuel Whittemore, Jr. Thomas Whittemore. James Williams. Nathaniel Williams. Timothy Willison. George Wilson. Josiah Wilson. Thomas Wilson. William Wilton. Henry Win ship. Isaac Winship. John Winship. Coolidge Wood. Charles Wyman. Phipps Wyman. James Yates. The war against Great Britain, which was proclaimed on the 19th of June, 1812, was unpopular in Cambridge, as in New England generally. The muster rolls are not within my reach; and I am unable to furnish a full list of volunteers who may have entered the army. A certificate remains on file, however, that the Cambridge Light Infantry were in camp at South Boston fifty-one days, commencing Sept. 10, 1814. The company consisted of Captain Samuel Child, Jr.; Lieutenant Jonathan C. Prentiss; Ensign Eliab W. Metcalf; S
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 22
t expense of the City and the Commonwealth, it was restored in 1858 as nearly as possible to its original state, and enclosed by a substantial iron fence. The United States contributed three cannon, which were duly mounted. Let no unpatriotic hand destroy this revolutionary relic, now known as Fort Washington. A still more formiam, and John Wyman, served as substitutes for other drafted men. To Cambridge rightfully belongs the honor of organizing the first company of militia in the United States, which was enlisted expressly for the defence of the government in the War of the Rebellion, 1861. Soon after the Presidential election in 1860, many who caret was announced that sixty persons had enlisted, and that the company had been accepted by the Governor. Two days afterwards, April 15th, the President of the United States issued a proclamation, calling for 75,000 volunteers, to serve three months, in defence of the Union. On the 16th, the Governor issued his orders; and this co
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