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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register. Search the whole document.

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Daniel Hill (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
Cole, John Cole, Jr., Samuel Cole, Aaron Comstock. Joshua Converse, Joseph Cook, Daniel Cooper, John Craige, Samuel Cutter, Benjamin Darling, Edward Dickson, John Dickson, Jr., William Doty, Thomas Durant, Henry Evans, Edward Fillebrown, John Fillebrown, Richard Fillebrown, John Fowle, Simon Gardis. Samuel Gookin, Jr., Joseph Hamilton, Solomon Hancock, Cato Hanker, Joseph Hartwell, Elisha Hastings, William Hastings, Jason Hazard, Timothy Heath, Abraham Hill, Andrew Hill, Benjamin Hill, Daniel Hill, Zachariah Hill, Israel Hinds, Samuel Hinds, Aaron Hodges, Nathaniel Holden, Elisha Holmes, Daniel Hovey, Simon Howard, Jonathan Ingersol, Jonas Jackson, John Kidder, David Lamson, Edward Manning, William Marshall, John Mason, John Matthews, Thomas Mayhew, Francis Moore, Jr., William Moore, Christopher Mudgeon, John Mullett, John Nutting, Daniel Paine, Stephen Paine, Daniel Parkhurst, Thomas Peirce, Warren Perkins, Reuben Prentice, Addison Richardson, John Rickey, John Robbins, Joseph Rob
Billerica (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
conflict in which all the young men were actively engaged. But their retreat toward Boston was far different. From the westerly border of Menotomy to their point of departure by Beech Street into the Milk Row Road, their passage was through a flame of fire. The provincials rallied from the towns in the vicinity The list of killed, wounded, and missing, gives the names of twenty-three towns, which, with their respective number of killed are as follows: Acton, 3; Bedford, 1; Beverly, 1; Billerica; Brookline, 1; Cambridge, 6; Charlestown, 2; Chelmsford; Concord; Danvers, 7; Dedham, 1; Framingham; Lexington, 10; Lynn, 4; Medford, 2; Needham, 5; Newton; Roxbury; Salem, 1; Stow; Sudbury, 2; Watertown, 1; Woburn, 2. See Frothingham's Siege of Boston, pp. 80, 81. Certainly some other towns, and probably many, besides these, were represented in this sanguinary conflict. even to as great a distance as Salem, and hung upon their rear and flanks, firing upon them from every advantageous poi
Sudbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
into the Milk Row Road, their passage was through a flame of fire. The provincials rallied from the towns in the vicinity The list of killed, wounded, and missing, gives the names of twenty-three towns, which, with their respective number of killed are as follows: Acton, 3; Bedford, 1; Beverly, 1; Billerica; Brookline, 1; Cambridge, 6; Charlestown, 2; Chelmsford; Concord; Danvers, 7; Dedham, 1; Framingham; Lexington, 10; Lynn, 4; Medford, 2; Needham, 5; Newton; Roxbury; Salem, 1; Stow; Sudbury, 2; Watertown, 1; Woburn, 2. See Frothingham's Siege of Boston, pp. 80, 81. Certainly some other towns, and probably many, besides these, were represented in this sanguinary conflict. even to as great a distance as Salem, and hung upon their rear and flanks, firing upon them from every advantageous point. The British loss, in this retreat, is reported to have been seventy-three killed, one hundred and seventy-four wounded, and twenty-six missing,— the most of which were taken prisoners.
South Boston (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
lliam Wilton. Henry Win ship. Isaac Winship. John Winship. Coolidge Wood. Charles Wyman. Phipps Wyman. James Yates. The war against Great Britain, which was proclaimed on the 19th of June, 1812, was unpopular in Cambridge, as in New England generally. The muster rolls are not within my reach; and I am unable to furnish a full list of volunteers who may have entered the army. A certificate remains on file, however, that the Cambridge Light Infantry were in camp at South Boston fifty-one days, commencing Sept. 10, 1814. The company consisted of Captain Samuel Child, Jr.; Lieutenant Jonathan C. Prentiss; Ensign Eliab W. Metcalf; Sergeants, John Ruggles, William Hunnewell, Oliver L. Child, Rufus Roberts; Corporals, Jacob H. Bates, Asa Wyman; Fifer, Nathaniel Munroe; Privates, William Bates, Elijah Bellows, David Bowtell, John Brackett, William Brown, James Child, Nathaniel Colburn, Charles Everett, John Fillebrown, Timothy Flagg, Abraham J. Gould, Henry Greenwood
West Boston (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
e was after wards built. For the next few days the approaches were carried on briskly, nearly to the top of the hill. On the 17th, the morning was foggy. A detachment of 300 men, under the direction of Gen. Putnam, broke ground on the top of the hill, on Lechmere's Point, at a distance of not more than half a mile from the ship. Between twelve and one o'clock, the fog cleared away, and the ship began to cannonade the Americans with round and grape shot, and some shells were thrown from West-Boston. One soldier was wounded, and the party driven from the works. On the next day, Gen. Heath with 300 men renewed the work, and although severely cannonaded, held his ground without loss. The fortification was completed within a few days, during which the cannonade continued, but to no effect. Memoirs, pp. 32-34. This fortress rendered important service in the final attack, which resulted in the evacuation of Boston by the British army. Feb. 25, 1776, some heavy cannon were mounted o
Watertown (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
Savage's Winthrop, II. 151. He resided a short time in Watertown, but came to Cambridge before May 1, 1632, Ibid., i. 7, to take charge of the soldiers raised from Charlestown, Watertown, and Cambridge, which are about sixty men, and to go fort, the committee of militia of Charlestown, Cambridge, and Watertown, were ordered and required to impress such armor, breasts sent warrants to the commanders-in-chief of Charlestown, Watertown, Cambridge, and the Village, Malden, and Woburn, to raise Needham, 5; Newton; Roxbury; Salem, 1; Stow; Sudbury, 2; Watertown, 1; Woburn, 2. See Frothingham's Siege of Boston, pp. 80ss, p. 292. The other field officers were William Bond of Watertown, Lieut.-col., and Michael Jackson, of Newton, Major. A fo 0. December 16, 1776, Voted, to desire the Selectmen of Watertown to find a Drum and deliver the same to Mr. Eayers, our dr: The powder last bought by Deacon Hill and Mr. Wyeth (at Watertown) came to £ 37. 10. 0. July 26, 1780. Voted to meet at 5
Sewell's Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
idge. Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment at West side of Prospect Hill on the road leading from Charlestown Road to Menotomy. Colonel Sargeant's Regiment at Inman's Farm. Mass. Arch., CXLVI. 340. It is said that Gen. Putnam's Headquarters were in the Inman house. Frothingham says that during the next winter the troops were accommodated in barracks thus: At Prospect Hill, 3,464; at different places,— Number One, Inman's House, &c., 3,460; at Roxbury, 3,795; at Dorchester, 814; at Sewall's Point, 400; at Cambridge Barracks, 640; at Winter Hill, 3,380; in the College, 640; in the New College, 640; in the Old College, 240; North Chapel, 160; total, 17,633; exclusive of private houses in Cambridge. Siege of Boston, p. 291. After the 19th of April, 1775, not many important military events occurred within the borders of this town, while it was occupied by the army. A few are mentioned by Gen. Heath, who was an eye-witness: Nov. 9th. At the top of high water, the tide being v
Dracut (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ce was engaged in a war with the Indians, representing that in the month of July last past, he was commissionated and appointed to be Colonel of all the forces in the western frontiers of Middlesex and Essex, together with the town of Brookfield, by his Honor the Lieutenant Governor, and that he had visited all the stations at great personal expense, and at the hazard of his life; he reported the number of men now in the service of this Government in the towns following, viz.: Dunstable, 40; Dracut, 12; Almsbury, 10; Haverhill, 12; Groton, 14; Lancaster, 14; Turkey-Hills, 12; Rutland, 25; Brookfield, 10; total, 149. Ibid., LXXII. 169-172. At a later period, Rev. Ammi-Ruhamah Cutter (a Cambridge man), H. C. 1725, having been dismissed from his charge at North Yarmouth, served his country as Captain several years before his death, which occurred at Louisburg in March, 1746. Cutter Family, 55-59. The names of a few non-commissioned officers and privates also, during these troublou
Concord (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
ordered, Charlestowne, Newetowne, Watertowne, Concord, Deddam, to bee another regiment, whearof Johenue to Menotomy, and thence to Lexington and Concord, Captain Thatcher and his company were among nty-eight,— equal to the distance to and from Concord. In commemoration of their patriotism, I insn of 1775, when the British troops marched to Concord. On the 19th of April, as soon as intelligenn of 1775, when the British troops marched to Concord. On the 19th of April, as soon as intelligenn of 1775, when the British troops marched to Concord. On the 19th of April, as soon as intelligenaughter, which they had made at Lexington and Concord, fired more than one hundred bullets into thethe damages done at Cambridge, Lexington, and Concord, by the King's troops, on the nineteenth of AConcord, £ 274. 16. 7. In the morning, at Concord, the military movements seem to have been dirn arrangement was made to give instruction at Concord, to which place a part of the library and app[2 more...]
France (France) (search for this): chapter 22
in 1758; Brigadier-general, as early as 1760, and Major-general of the militia throughout the Province in 1771. During the French War, which commenced in 1753 (though not formally declared until 1756) and continued until 1763, he was active and energetic in the raising of troops and the general administration of military affairs in the Province; but in the Army Cambridge seems to have had no officer of higher rank than Captain. The same remark holds true in regard to the shorter war with France, 1744 to 1748. A paper is on file in the office of the City Clerk, endorsed, Men enlisted in Cambridge against Canada, 1745 and 1746, containing the following names: Capt. [William] Phips, Lieut. [Spencer] Phips, Lieut. Moore, Sergeant Gee, Sam uel Andrew, William Barrett, Jr., John Batherick, W. Brown, Nathaniel Chad ick, Downing Champney, Solomon Champney, John Clark, Abraham Colfrey, Benjamin Crackbone, Robert Crowell, Cutter's Man,——Fillebrown, Simon Goddinz, Nathaniel Hancock, Andrew H
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