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Boston (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
Horace Sargent Dunn. Second Lieutenant 22d Mass. Vols. (Infantry), October 1; 1861; died at New York, May 22, 1862, of disease contracted in the service. Horace Sargent Dunn was the son of James Cutler and Sophia (Paine) Dunn, of Boston, Massachusetts. He was born in Williamstown, Vermont, at the residence of his maternal grandfather, the Hon. Elijah Paine, on the 12th of June, 1842. Much of his early years was spent among the green hills of Vermont. At the age of twelve years he enols. (Infantry), September 12, 1862-June 18, 1863; Second Lieutenant 54th Mass. Vols. January 31, 1864; first Lieutenant, December 16, 1864; killed at Boykin's Mills, near Camden, S. C., April 18, 1865. Edward Lewis Stevens was born in Boston, Massachusetts, September 30, 1842. His father, Silas Stevens, at the time resided in Boston, but afterwards removed to Brighton. His mother was Jane, eleventh child of Nathan Smith, who fought in the battle of Lexington. She was descended from Thoma
St. Peter's church (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 31
mortal wound. He was immediately carried to the house of Mr. Harris Freeman, near Mount Holly Church, about one mile from Kelly's Ford. From this gentleman and his family the dying soldier received the most tender attentions. Everything in their power was done to alleviate his sufferings; but he survived his wounds only twelve hours, dying on the 18th of September, 1863, in the twenty-second year of his age. His body was taken to Albany, where it was buried with military honors from St. Peter's Church, October 10, 1863. Winthrop Perkins Boynton. Second Lieutenant 55th Mass. Vols. (Infantry), July 8, 1863; first Lieutenant, November 21, 1863; Captain, November 23, 1864; killed at Honey Hill, S. C., November 30, 1864. the subject of this sketch was born in Boston, August 29, 1841. His parents were Perkins and Mary Anne (Simonds) Boynton. After two years spent at the Endicott School in Boston, he was sent to the public Latin School, of which Francis Gardner, Esq. was pri
South Mills (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
career of Lieutenant Stevens, after he joined the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Volunteers, is identical with that of the regiment. He was killed at the battle of Boykin's Mills, April 18, 1865, near Camden, South Carolina, during an expedition to Camden under Brigadier-General Potter, which left Georgetown, April 5, 1865. The Fifty-fourth was ordered to cross Swift's Creek, about eight miles from Camden, at a point to the right of the road, in order to flank the enemy, (who were opposite the heCamden, at a point to the right of the road, in order to flank the enemy, (who were opposite the head of the column,) and, after considerable opposition, succeeded in crossing at Boykin's Mills, ten miles from the creek. The enemy vigorously resisted the movement, but began to fall back on the appearance of a piece of artillery, and five companies of the Fifty-fourth charged across the stream, when the Rebels fled. Lieutenant Stevens fell in the action, and was buried on the spot. In the words of the obituary drawn up by his fellow officers:— He fell so near the enemy's works, that
Ossining (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
t May 3, 1862; Captain, October 24, 1862; died near Kelly's Ford, Va., September 18, 1863, of wounds received from guerillas, September 17. Augustus Barker was born in Albany, New York, April 24, 1842. He was the son of William Hazard and Jeannette (James) Barker. His grandfather on the paternal side was Jacob Barker of New Orleans, Louisiana. His mother, who died soon after his birth, was the daughter of the late William James of Albany. He attended a variety of schools,—at Albany, Sing-Sing, and Geneva, in New York; at New Haven, Connecticut; and finally at Exeter, New Hampshire, where he was a pupil of the Academy. In July, 1859, he entered the Freshman Class of Harvard University. In College he was genial, frank, and popular. His college life, however, closed with the second term of the Sophomore year, and he soon after entered the volunteer cavalry service of New York as a private in the Harris Light Cavalry, afterwards known as the Fifth New York Cavalry, Colonel De
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
ss which is so apt to paralyze the free actions and thoughts of a young fellow; but he is such a man that he won my affections so much that I felt and even wished that danger might have threatened, so I could have shown my feeling towards him by my ardor and sincerity in averting it. . . . . Besides the invaluable instruction I have received from him in person, his official business so required his presence here and there and everywhere, that I gained quite an idea of the country between Harper's Ferry and Woodstock (which was then the advanced Headquarters), a distance of sixty-two miles. My idea of scenery hitherto has been governed entirely by the region of the Catskills and Berkshire County; but never have I seen so beautiful and peaceful a scene, at the same time grand and extensive, as the Valley of the Shenandoah presented. Forever our home on the Hudson, and our haunt in the hills of Berkshire, may be silent when the recollections of Central Virginia occur. Very soon after
New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
1863. Augustus Barker. Second Lieutenant 5th New York Cavalry, October 3, 186; first Lieutenant May 3, 1862; Captain, October 24, 1862; died near Kelly's Ford, Va., September 18, 1863, of wounds received from guerillas, September 17. Augustus Barker was born in Albany, New York, April 24, 1842. He was the son of William Hazard and Jeannette (James) Barker. His grandfather on the paternal side was Jacob Barker of New Orleans, Louisiana. His mother, who died soon after his birth, was the daughter of the late William James of Albany. He attended a variety of schools,—at Albany, Sing-Sing, and Geneva, in New York; at New Haven, Connecticut; and finally at Exeter, New Hampshire, where he was a pupil of the Academy. In July, 1859, he entered the Freshman Class of Harvard University. In College he was genial, frank, and popular. His college life, however, closed with the second term of the Sophomore year, and he soon after entered the volunteer cavalry service of New Yo
Dorchester, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
ty has over-estimated Horace Sargent Dunn. Samuel Shelton Gould. Private 13th Mass. Vols. (Infantry), September, 1862; killed at Antietam, Md., September 17, 1862. Samuel Shelton Gould was born in Boston, January 1, 1843. His parents were Samuel L. Gould, at that time master of the Winthrop School, Boston, and Frances A. (Shelton) Gould. He was educated in the Boston schools till the twelfth year of his age, passing two years in the Latin School. His parents then removed to Dorchester, and he finished his preparatory course at the Roxbury Latin School. He entered College when he was fifteen years old, in 1858, and remained there one year, after which, for reasons of his own, but with the consent of his parents, he left College and went to sea as a common sailor in the Peabody, a vessel engaged at that time in the Australian trade. His journal, which he kept regularly and minutely during all his voyages, records a growing dissatisfaction with the hard work and poor f
Williamstown, Vermont (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
, and that he was struck by his beautiful appearance, and ordered a party to bury the remains. Thus fell this true Christian gentleman and soldier. No purer offering has been laid on the altar of freedom. Horace Sargent Dunn. Second Lieutenant 22d Mass. Vols. (Infantry), October 1; 1861; died at New York, May 22, 1862, of disease contracted in the service. Horace Sargent Dunn was the son of James Cutler and Sophia (Paine) Dunn, of Boston, Massachusetts. He was born in Williamstown, Vermont, at the residence of his maternal grandfather, the Hon. Elijah Paine, on the 12th of June, 1842. Much of his early years was spent among the green hills of Vermont. At the age of twelve years he entered the Boston Latin School where for five tears he pursued his studies diligently. Gentle and unselfish in his nature, truthful and conscientious, he was a general favorite both at home and at school. The resolutions passed by the Everett Literary Association of the Latin School, aft
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
efore Yorktown. Suddenly Yorktown was evacuated, and the army poured through, May 4th, to its first battle-field at Williamsburg, Hooker's division moving to the left against Fort Magruder. Colonel Dwight, considering Lieutenant Stevens's wound ste attack, and became hotly engaged in the woods directly in front of Fort Magruder, the principal work of the enemy at Williamsburg. There for several hours Hooker held his own against large odds, expecting help every minute, till a full third of hionel did not forget him, and, as I have said, often paid the tribute to his memory of telling how splendidly he did at Williamsburg; and I have no doubt he continued to do so till he met his own fate, two years and more afterwards. Lieutenant Stee, his name will ever be remembered, by those who knew him, for the distinguished services he rendered on the field of Williamsburg. Those services were beyond his rank and station, and were appreciated beyond his regiment, and through the whole div
Canton, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
r in South Boston. It is certain that his death occurred from disease, somewhere within the limits of the city, on the 3d of March, 1863. William Dwight Crane. Private 44th Mass. Vols. (Infantry), August 11, 1862; first Lieutenant 55th Mass. Vols., June 7, 1863; Captain, June 19, 1863; killed at Honey Hill, S. C., November 30, 1864. William Dwight Crane was born in East Boston, Massachusetts, November 29, 1840. He was the son of Phineas Miller Crane, M. D., a native of Canton, Massachusetts, and Susan Hooker Dwight, daughter of Seth Dwight, a merchant of Utica, New York, and one of the earliest settlers of the place. His grandfather on his father's side was Elijah Crane of Canton, for several years Major-General of the militia forces of Massachusetts, and also Grand-Master of the Grand Masonic Lodge of the State. General Crane was a man of strict integrity and uncommon firmness of will. His grandson William, though he had never seen him, had conceived a great admir
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