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Watertown (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
2, 1862-June 18, 1863; Second Lieutenant 54th Mass. Vols. January 31, 1864; first Lieutenant, December 16, 1864; killed at Boykin's Mills, near Camden, S. C., April 18, 1865. Edward Lewis Stevens was born in Boston, Massachusetts, September 30, 1842. His father, Silas Stevens, at the time resided in Boston, but afterwards removed to Brighton. His mother was Jane, eleventh child of Nathan Smith, who fought in the battle of Lexington. She was descended from Thomas Smith, who settled at Watertown in 1635. Stevens was fitted for Harvard University in the public schools of Brighton, and entered the Freshman Class in 1859. He left College, however, at the end of the Junior year, to join the Forty-fourth Massachusetts (Colonel F. L. Lee), a nine months regiment. He returned at the expiration of his service, in time to study for and receive his degree, and to write in the Class-Book his autobiography, of which the principal part here follows:— During the vacation of the summe
Camden, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
s of the struggle. Edward Lewis Stevens. Private 44th Mass. Vols. (Infantry), September 12, 1862-June 18, 1863; Second Lieutenant 54th Mass. Vols. January 31, 1864; first Lieutenant, December 16, 1864; killed at Boykin's Mills, near Camden, S. C., April 18, 1865. Edward Lewis Stevens was born in Boston, Massachusetts, September 30, 1842. His father, Silas Stevens, at the time resided in Boston, but afterwards removed to Brighton. His mother was Jane, eleventh child of Nathan Smitr the nation's life and freedom. The career of Lieutenant Stevens, after he joined the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Volunteers, is identical with that of the regiment. He was killed at the battle of Boykin's Mills, April 18, 1865, near Camden, South Carolina, during an expedition to Camden under Brigadier-General Potter, which left Georgetown, April 5, 1865. The Fifty-fourth was ordered to cross Swift's Creek, about eight miles from Camden, at a point to the right of the road, in order to fl
James Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
he whole of which time there was a severe rain. But so strong was his constitution, that, strange as it may seem, no ill effects resulted from this exposure. On the 3d of July he was engaged with his regiment in the capture of a battery on James Island. In this engagement several officers were wounded, among them Captain Goodwin of Company D; and Boynton was now detached and placed in command of this company, where he remained till his death. In the latter part of September, 1864, he wasess and such vocal music as we could muster. Captain Crane was the best chess-player of the regiment, and his sweet, clear voice made him a cherished member of our little glee-club. In July, 1864, we had our first brush as a regiment, on James Island, where we charged and captured a small field battery. I well remember the Captain's appearance as he came up to me after the charge, glowing with exercise and exultation, and the weary expression of his face later in the day, when he had but
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
unded, and his ammunition began to give out. The enemy perceiving our fire slacken, made a sudden onset that broke our line and forced it back in confusion. The troops were new; this was their first battle to most of them, and for a little while it looked as badly as could be for our side. No reinforcements were at hand; Kearney's division was coming, but not yet near enough to do any good. The Rebels seemed bent on pushing their advantage to the utmost; they came on yelling and shouting Bull Run, and it was the general feeling that for that day and field it was all up with us. To crown all, it now appeared that our artillery—three batteries, I think–was so sunk in the mud as to be almost inextricable, especially as a great many of the horses had been shot, and that it must be lost unless the enemy could be checked and considerable time gained. A few of the most experienced and bravest officers determined to accomplish this if possible, and so set about rallying the men and forming
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 31
day, October 26, and the regiment immediately proceeded by rail to Newbern, North Carolina, ninety miles up the Neuse River, and thence by transports to Washington, North Carolina. Private Crane participated in the campaign against the Wilmington Railroad, in November, the objective point of which was Tarborough. The forced marchvouac, and skirmish. The regiment had been in North Carolina but four days before General Foster began what is called the Tarborough march. We went to Washington, North Carolina, on the steamer George S. Collins. From Washington we marched towards Tarborough. I was in the skirmish at Roll's Mills, November 2d. We entered Willary of the capture of Newbern, the Rebels made an attack on the place, but finding it too strong they retired. General Foster, expecting them to attack Washington, North Carolina, immediately sent the Forty-fourth Massachusetts to reinforce the Twenty-seventh, then stationed at Washington. The Rebels did not make their appearanc
Exeter, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
1863, of wounds received from guerillas, September 17. Augustus Barker was born in Albany, New York, April 24, 1842. He was the son of William Hazard and Jeannette (James) Barker. His grandfather on the paternal side was Jacob Barker of New Orleans, Louisiana. His mother, who died soon after his birth, was the daughter of the late William James of Albany. He attended a variety of schools,—at Albany, Sing-Sing, and Geneva, in New York; at New Haven, Connecticut; and finally at Exeter, New Hampshire, where he was a pupil of the Academy. In July, 1859, he entered the Freshman Class of Harvard University. In College he was genial, frank, and popular. His college life, however, closed with the second term of the Sophomore year, and he soon after entered the volunteer cavalry service of New York as a private in the Harris Light Cavalry, afterwards known as the Fifth New York Cavalry, Colonel De Forrest. His first commission as Second Lieutenant of Company L bore date October 3
Concord (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
In July, 1861, he had been unanimously elected the first editor of the Harvard Magazine for his Junior year; and his last vacation was spent in preparation for his duties, and in a pleasant service with other students in making surveys upon Concord River. This stay near Concord made him many friends, prolonged his vacation and furnished him with a bright reminiscence, as its graphic record in the Harvard Magazine of October, 1861, will show. But after his return to Cambridge his interest, iConcord made him many friends, prolonged his vacation and furnished him with a bright reminiscence, as its graphic record in the Harvard Magazine of October, 1861, will show. But after his return to Cambridge his interest, in the war grew more intense, and when a commission was offered in the New York Excelsior Brigade, in which his brother was Major, his decision was taken at once to engage in the military service. On the day of his departure he received a sword from his Class. He writes at this time:— I consider it not only a duty, but a privilege, to throw my aptness for arms and my determination to be useful into the more pressing duties of the day. Besides, I shall not regret, if at the end of the yea
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
enlisting I had felt it a duty to be doing something to save my country in this terrible civil war. The captain of my company was Spencer W. Richardson of Boston. I went into camp at Readville, Massachusetts, August 29, 1862; was mustered into the service of the United States, September 12th. The regiment left camp October 22d, for Newbern, North Carolina, arriving on Sunday, A. M., October 26th. I was with the regiment in every march, bivouac, and skirmish. The regiment had been in North Carolina but four days before General Foster began what is called the Tarborough march. We went to Washington, North Carolina, on the steamer George S. Collins. From Washington we marched towards Tarborough. I was in the skirmish at Roll's Mills, November 2d. We entered Williamston, November 3d; Hamilton, November 4th. We pushed on towards Tarborough by rapid marches, hoping to surprise the enemy; but on the morning of November 6th, General Foster, hearing that the enemy were in force at Ta
Utica (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
thin the limits of the city, on the 3d of March, 1863. William Dwight Crane. Private 44th Mass. Vols. (Infantry), August 11, 1862; first Lieutenant 55th Mass. Vols., June 7, 1863; Captain, June 19, 1863; killed at Honey Hill, S. C., November 30, 1864. William Dwight Crane was born in East Boston, Massachusetts, November 29, 1840. He was the son of Phineas Miller Crane, M. D., a native of Canton, Massachusetts, and Susan Hooker Dwight, daughter of Seth Dwight, a merchant of Utica, New York, and one of the earliest settlers of the place. His grandfather on his father's side was Elijah Crane of Canton, for several years Major-General of the militia forces of Massachusetts, and also Grand-Master of the Grand Masonic Lodge of the State. General Crane was a man of strict integrity and uncommon firmness of will. His grandson William, though he had never seen him, had conceived a great admiration for his character, and frequently expressed the wish that he might prove himse
New Haven (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
d near Kelly's Ford, Va., September 18, 1863, of wounds received from guerillas, September 17. Augustus Barker was born in Albany, New York, April 24, 1842. He was the son of William Hazard and Jeannette (James) Barker. His grandfather on the paternal side was Jacob Barker of New Orleans, Louisiana. His mother, who died soon after his birth, was the daughter of the late William James of Albany. He attended a variety of schools,—at Albany, Sing-Sing, and Geneva, in New York; at New Haven, Connecticut; and finally at Exeter, New Hampshire, where he was a pupil of the Academy. In July, 1859, he entered the Freshman Class of Harvard University. In College he was genial, frank, and popular. His college life, however, closed with the second term of the Sophomore year, and he soon after entered the volunteer cavalry service of New York as a private in the Harris Light Cavalry, afterwards known as the Fifth New York Cavalry, Colonel De Forrest. His first commission as Second Lieut
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