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Annapolis (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
His first commission as Second Lieutenant of Company L bore date October 31, 1861; his commission as First Lieutenant, May 3, 1862; and his commission as Captain, October 24, 1862. His regiment passed much of its early career in camp near Annapolis, Maryland, under the command of Brigadier-General Hatch, United States Volunteers, a very energetic and agreeable man, as Barker wrote, who superintends in person, and instructs and suggests when he sees the officers at a loss. Although convinced ois spirits. I never saw him after our release from captivity, but I learned of that brave, generous baby's untimely death with great sorrow. After two months of imprisonment, Captain Barker was, on the 6th of May, exchanged, and ordered to Annapolis, where he rejoined his regiment on the 27th of the same month. He was engaged in many severe fights and constantly in skirmishes, and his regiment particularly distinguished itself at the battle of Gettysburg, under General Kilpatrick. He wen
Berkshire (Mass.) (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
here and there and everywhere, that I gained quite an idea of the country between Harper's Ferry and Woodstock (which was then the advanced Headquarters), a distance of sixty-two miles. My idea of scenery hitherto has been governed entirely by the region of the Catskills and Berkshire County; but never have I seen so beautiful and peaceful a scene, at the same time grand and extensive, as the Valley of the Shenandoah presented. Forever our home on the Hudson, and our haunt in the hills of Berkshire, may be silent when the recollections of Central Virginia occur. Very soon after the Virginia campaign, about the 1st of August, 1862, Lieutenant Barker was taken ill with typhoid fever, but before yielding to the disease, he had, in a severe skirmish near Culpeper Court-House, taken three prisoners single-handed and brought them in. He succeeded in getting to within a mile of Culpeper Court-House, more than a day's ride from where he started. There he was obliged to alight, being un
Folly Island, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
n sent to take part in the attack on Charleston, and encamped on Folly Island, where he accompanied it. He there passed most of his remaining phic account of the Sunday inspection. Soon after arriving at Folly Island he had been placed third in the order for promotion on the list dom of Heaven. Soon after, with his regiment, he returned to Folly Island. In the latter part of May, 1864, he was sick for two weeks or h, and handsome soldier that he was, through the desert heats of Folly Island, the toilsome fatigue of the trenches before Wagner, the malariogive them their just pay, we returned to our former position on Folly Island, taking new ground near the fortifications at Stono Inlet. Here Captain Crane's company, however, had been left in garrison at Folly Island, and, dreading lest he should be ordered back, he volunteered to an expedition, but his company left behind at Fort Delafield on Folly Island. He volunteered to go in any position where his services were n
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
idea of the country between Harper's Ferry and Woodstock (which was then the advanced Headquarters), a distance of sixty-two miles. My idea of scenery hitherto has been governed entirely by the region of the Catskills and Berkshire County; but never have I seen so beautiful and peaceful a scene, at the same time grand and extensive, as the Valley of the Shenandoah presented. Forever our home on the Hudson, and our haunt in the hills of Berkshire, may be silent when the recollections of Central Virginia occur. Very soon after the Virginia campaign, about the 1st of August, 1862, Lieutenant Barker was taken ill with typhoid fever, but before yielding to the disease, he had, in a severe skirmish near Culpeper Court-House, taken three prisoners single-handed and brought them in. He succeeded in getting to within a mile of Culpeper Court-House, more than a day's ride from where he started. There he was obliged to alight, being unable to proceed any farther. Having had a trooper deta
Melbourne (Victoria, Australia) (search for this): chapter 31
o lengthen this episode, and see more of the world, which he would not probably do if he made the return voyage, led him to leave the Peabody; and within a few days he shipped again, in the Commonwealth, an American vessel bound for Callao. He carried out with him from Boston several Latin and Greek text-books, and other books for reading and study, intending to use them in his spare hours, so as to reenter College on his return with as little delay as possible. And during the passage to Melbourne, strange as it may seem in view of all his disadvantages, he really did devote his spare time to this occupation. On the Commonwealth he found the work harder and the fare worse. In sailor phrase, it was an all-hands ship, instead of watch and watch ; that is, all hands were required to be on deck during the day. This left him only a half-hour out of the hour allowed for dinner, and a half-hour in the dogwatch; and of this short time a good part had to be given to the care of his cloth
Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
pedition he wrote under date of February 28th:— Just two weeks ago to-day we left South Carolina, and ceased, forever and a day, I trust, to be foolish islanders. We broke camp at daylight, . . . . and embarked at noon . . . . for the State of Florida. We had a delightful voyage, and I dreamed (by day) of De Soto and Ponce de Leon, and the romantic search for the fountain of youth. . . . . . We landed at Jacksonville, Monday, and bivouacked in town. . . . . Next morning we marched eight of the succeeding winter, and the toilsome Florida marches of February, 1864. Here we were separated for two months, to meet again in May, when he recounted in glowing terms his adventures at Pilatka, among the orange-groves and flowers of Central Florida. With the regiment, sullen, turbulent, and mutinous at the neglect of government to give them their just pay, we returned to our former position on Folly Island, taking new ground near the fortifications at Stono Inlet. Here we erecte
North Hampton, New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
wn and all from different Families. Five lines of this pamphlet are devoted to Henry French Brown, and he is described as a good scholar, more fond of books than play. He was discharged from the Farm School on the 18th of May, 1853, and went to New York with his former teacher, Mr. John A. Lamprey, to be employed in an insurance office. This did not last long, for some reason, and he was then taken by another teacher, Mr. Eben Sperry French, who removed him to his own home at North Hampton, New Hampshire, and made him a member of Exeter Academy. He entered the Academy at the age of fourteen, August 23, 1854, and remained there until his admission to the Sophomore Class at Cambridge, in 1860. Of his standing in the Academy the following statement is given by the principal, Gideon L. Soule, Esq.:— He remained in the Academy till he was well prepared to enter the Sophomore Class at Harvard. He was a chubby, fair-faced boy, looking younger than he was, healthy and always che
Honey Hill (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
th Mass. Vols. (Infantry), July 8, 1863; first Lieutenant, November 21, 1863; Captain, November 23, 1864; killed at Honey Hill, S. C., November 30, 1864. the subject of this sketch was born in Boston, August 29, 1841. His parents were Perkins an Broad River, and marched inland eight miles, encountering the enemy (about two thousand two hundred strong) . . . . at Honey Hill, on the Grahamsville Road. In the fight which ensued, miserable generalship won us as rare a defeat as the whole war hls. (Infantry), August 11, 1862; first Lieutenant 55th Mass. Vols., June 7, 1863; Captain, June 19, 1863; killed at Honey Hill, S. C., November 30, 1864. William Dwight Crane was born in East Boston, Massachusetts, November 29, 1840. He was the The troops landed at Boyd's Neck, and marched out on the morning of November 30, 1865, to the disastrous field of Honey Hill. Captain Crane rode at the head of the column, dressed, as I recollect, with his usual neatness and precision, and app
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
to them, he was hit in the neck, and fell again. The line was repulsed, and his body was never recovered. A writer in the Boston Daily Advertiser for December 4, 1865, under date of Charleston, November 25th, gives the following account of the battle:— Your readers may remember that Major-General Foster despatched General Hatch with some four thousand men, in November last, to cut the Charleston and Savannah Railroad, and offer another objective point to Sherman, then coming from Atlanta shoreward. The expedition landed at Boyd's Neck, on Broad River, and marched inland eight miles, encountering the enemy (about two thousand two hundred strong) . . . . at Honey Hill, on the Grahamsville Road. In the fight which ensued, miserable generalship won us as rare a defeat as the whole war has witnessed, we losing over twelve hundred men to the Rebels' forty. The Massachusetts Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth infantry were engaged. . . . . My object in revisiting the field was to dis
Broad River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 31
er despatched General Hatch with some four thousand men, in November last, to cut the Charleston and Savannah Railroad, and offer another objective point to Sherman, then coming from Atlanta shoreward. The expedition landed at Boyd's Neck, on Broad River, and marched inland eight miles, encountering the enemy (about two thousand two hundred strong) . . . . at Honey Hill, on the Grahamsville Road. In the fight which ensued, miserable generalship won us as rare a defeat as the whole war has witd his regiment at Hilton Head starting upon an expedition, but his company left behind at Fort Delafield on Folly Island. He volunteered to go in any position where his services were needed, and was assigned to my staff as aid. While going up Broad River in a dense fog, with no pilot and with uncertainty whether the vessel was approaching the enemy's land batteries or not, he urgently requested to be allowed to land with a small force sent ashore to reconnoitre, but was refused, as his servic
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