hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Ticknor 393 1 Browse Search
Elisha Ticknor 314 20 Browse Search
Department de Ville de Paris (France) 176 0 Browse Search
Madrid (Spain) 158 0 Browse Search
Gottingen (Lower Saxony, Germany) 150 0 Browse Search
Daniel Webster 121 1 Browse Search
France (France) 100 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 84 0 Browse Search
Wolfgang A. Von Goethe 72 0 Browse Search
Friedrich Tieck 72 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). Search the whole document.

Found 636 total hits in 213 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
G. F. Creuzer (search for this): chapter 6
Chapter 6: Mr. Ticknor leaves Gottingen. Frankfort. Fr. Von Schlegel. Voss. Creuzer. arrival in Paris and residence there. A. W. Von Schlegel. Duke and Duchess de Broglie. Humboldt. Helen Maria Williams. Madame de Stael. say. Benjamin Constant. Southey. Madame Recamier. Chateaubriand. adventure with the police. Marshal Davoust. visit to Draveil. Journal. Gottingen, March 26, 1817.—Yesterday I went round and took leave of all my acquaintances and friended more than any human being, except my wife. So fresh and faithful are his feelings in his old age to the memory of that extraordinary and unfortunate woman, who has been dead nearly thirty years Promising to return to supper, I went to see Creuzer, author of the Symbolik, etc. He is now, I should think, about fifty,—a man apparently of a strong, decided character, and perhaps not very amiable. I found him pleasant in conversation, and much disposed to tell something of the much he knows;
F. A. Wolf (search for this): chapter 6
t; and so, he added with touching simplicity, we gave up our Sunday's glass of wine and struck coffee out of our luxuries, and did it too without regret, for we were young then; and God has given my wife, as you will see when you know her, a heart no less happy and light than mine. He showed me his library, not large, but choice and neatly arranged, . . . . his manuscripts all in the same form . . . . . Among them was his translation of Aristophanes,—written, as he himself confessed, because Wolf had undertaken the Clouds,—and six plays of Shakespeare, in which, he said, he intended to avoid Schlegel's stiffness, but will not, I think, succeed. Of his Louise he told me it was written in 1785, but not printed till ten years after; and, on my remarking that there was a vivacity and freshness about many parts of it that made me feel as if it were partly taken from life, he confessed that he had intended the character of the old pastor for a portrait of his wife's father, Boier. When
D. B. Warden (search for this): chapter 6
tified by the arms of the Bourbons, they were easily satisfied. One of the men was impudent to me about my curtains being closed, which he thought were kept drawn, not so much for the milder light, as to prevent my neighbors from seeing what was going on. But except that I had no difficulty with them. One or two circumstances in the transaction are rather striking. In the first place, that four persons should be sent when it is usual to send but two, as I am told; in the second place, Mr. Warden says this is the first instance he has ever known that an American citizen has been subjected to such an insult and outrage as to have a search of any kind made in his quarters; also the form of the order itself was uncommon. It was a printed paper, the blanks of which were filled by some secretary, and the whole signed by the minister. The minister, however, had gone over and corrected it in his own handwriting; had added libels or libellous writings; and, instead of the words perquisit
M. De Humboldt (search for this): chapter 6
was not large,—Sir Humphry and Lady Davy, Baron Humboldt, the Duke de Laval, Augustus Schlegel, Augd force to French lightness and vivacity; and Humboldt was so excited by the presence of Sir Humphrys I have in Paris, thus far, are Schlegel and Humboldt; and the manner of living adopted by both of society, and allows him to act as a king. Baron Humboldt unites them both. His ample and regular f with a friend and townsman, when they met Baron Humboldt. Mr. Ticknor bowed, and was passing on, when Humboldt stopped, and said that there was to be a function at the Institute the next day, and thaer was accepted with proper acknowledgments. Humboldt then added, Perhaps your friend would like tove—at Miss Williams's, and was amused to hear Humboldt, with his decisive talent and minute knowledgd ill-feeling, and I chose to remain silent. Humboldt remarked it, and said he thought at the timey me a trick if he had the opportunity. What Humboldt did not know until I told him, is, that I met
De M. De Chateaubriand (search for this): chapter 6
. Barante, whom I already knew, there were Chateaubriand and Mad. Recamier, two persons whom I was be added, always without extravagance. Chateaubriand is a short man, with a dark complexion, bl the whole table laughed at Barante's wit, Chateaubriand did not even smile;—not, perhaps, because right. June 2.—I called this morning on Chateaubriand. He is now poor, for his occupation is got. The evening I passed delightfully at Chateaubriand's, with a few of his friends; most of whomo in such a situation. Everbody looked to Chateaubriand. If I were without a family, I would trava few evenings before the perquisition, at Chateaubriand's, when the conversation turning on the Frns, naturally vexed me, and I told him and Chateaubriand very circumstantially how things stood. Ted, especially at the decided satisfaction Chateaubriand expressed. If, then, he is a spy, I doubthe Troubadours and Fabliaux to Delille and Chateaubriand; but no nation, I think, has hit like them[1 more...]<
Frederick Schlegel (search for this): chapter 6
l principalities, Oldenburg, Nassau, etc., uniting in himself six votes. There was a large company there,—the French Minister and the Saxon, but above all, Frederick Schlegel, who was very gay, and talked with much spirit and effect upon a variety of subjects, chiefly literary and political. Berg is a man of extensive knowledgorgotten, excepting that of Talleyrand. The conversation, however, was not wholly political, as there were a number of ladies in the party; and, besides, Frederick Schlegel's good-nature, literature, and wit would have anywhere formed a counterpoise for the spirit of diplomacy; so that, on the whole, it was one of the pleasant of Aristophanes,—written, as he himself confessed, because Wolf had undertaken the Clouds,—and six plays of Shakespeare, in which, he said, he intended to avoid Schlegel's stiffness, but will not, I think, succeed. Of his Louise he told me it was written in 1785, but not printed till ten years after; and, on my remarking that th<
G. F. Cooke (search for this): chapter 6
in Euripides, and the praises of Longinus. His study of the ancient statues struck me in the passage,—when, in his second insanity, he cries out in agony,— Vois-tu d'affreux serpens, de son front s'elancer, Et de leur longs replis te ceindre, et te presser?— he started back into the posture of Laocoon with great effect. Like Demosthenes, he has had difficulties to overcome, and even now at times he cannot conceal an unpleasant lisp; but I have never seen acting, in many respects, like his. Cooke had a more vehement and lofty genius, and Kean has sometimes, perhaps, flashes of eccentric talent; but in an equal elevation of mind, and in dignity and force, Talma, I think, left them all far behind. April 14.—I called this morning on A. W. Schlegel. His history, like his brother Frederick's, is singular and unfortunate. Their father was a man of considerable learning, and a poet whose religious odes and hymns are still read. Augustus, who was his youngest son but one, was sent ear
Marechal Davoust (search for this): chapter 6
roglie. Humboldt. Helen Maria Williams. Madame de Stael. say. Benjamin Constant. Southey. Madame Recamier. Chateaubriand. adventure with the police. Marshal Davoust. visit to Draveil. Journal. Gottingen, March 26, 1817.—Yesterday I went round and took leave of all my acquaintances and friends. From many I did ns who interested or amused me were staying there, and the days passed pleasantly in driving about the neighborhood . . . . Once I went with the ladies to see Marshal Davoust, who lives at a fine chateau about three leagues from Draveil. Mad. Davoust received us, the Marshal having gone out hunting. She is a good-looking woman ofDavoust received us, the Marshal having gone out hunting. She is a good-looking woman of some cultivation. When her husband was absent, she shut herself up, and received no company. So once, when she went to court with her husband, after such a seclusion, Bonaparte asked her, Eh bien, ma belle Princesse d'eckmuhl, pour combien avez-vous vendu votre foin, cette annee? We fell accidentally into a discussion almost
one of his being present at a levee of Bonaparte's where our minister, Livingston, was so ignorant of all proprieties as to ask the Emperor whether he had received good news from St. Domingo lately,—at a time when everything had gone by the board there; of his having seen a letter from Napoleon to Jerome, when he was King of Westphalia, beginning, Mon frere, tu ne cesses pas daetre polisson, etc. Smidt told me that when the Crown Prince was in Bremen, he told him, that when Napoleon sent Le Clerc to St. Domingo (who died soon after his arrival), he sent him not only for the purpose of subduing and governing that island, but also with regular instructions and plans for extending his influence and power to the United States, and named, at the same time, four persons in France and one in America who were privy to the design, all of whose names Mr. Smidt had forgotten, excepting that of Talleyrand. The conversation, however, was not wholly political, as there were a number of ladies
P. A. Stapfer (search for this): chapter 6
. . Amidst all his calamities, it is curious that what mortifies and exasperates him the most is the loss of his place in the Academy, which was taken from him because he voted for the perpetual exile of Louis XVI. May 2.—This evening I have passed, as I do most of my Sunday evenings, very pleasantly, at Helen Maria Williams's. The company generally consists of literary Englishmen, with several Frenchmen, well known in the world,—such as Marron the preacher, whom Bonaparte liked so much, Stapfer the Swiss minister, who concluded the treaty of 1802, several professors of the College de France, etc. This evening Mrs. Godwin was there, wife of the notorious William Godwin, and successor to the no less notorious Mary Wollstonecraft. She has come to Paris to sell a romance, of which I have forgotten the title, that her husband has recently written, and thinks as good as Caleb Williams. The booksellers of Paris, I believe, are not of his opinion, and probably they are right, for Mr. Go
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...