hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Stonewall Jackson 1,296 0 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 788 0 Browse Search
Fitz Lee 718 4 Browse Search
James Longstreet 581 1 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 529 1 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 513 5 Browse Search
Richard S. Ewell 426 4 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 410 4 Browse Search
J. E. B. Stuart 362 0 Browse Search
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) 361 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

Found 485 total hits in 87 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
C. M. Wilcox (search for this): chapter 24
Spotswood, had built the first blastfur-nace for making iron, in America—the impending conflict would begin, immediate preparations for which he took in hand on returning to his camp. Lee was accompanied to his point of observation by Longstreet, just returned from his Tennessee campaign; Field, commanding Hood's old division, and Kershaw, that of McLaws; Ewell, and his division commanders, Early, Edward Johnson and Rodes; A. P. Hill, with his division commanders, R. H. Anderson, Heth and Wilcox. It is said that after his information-seeking overlook of the Federal camps, Lee turned to these officers, and pointing toward Chancellorsville, said, that in his opinion, the Federal army would cross at Germanna or at Ely's; and that he then bade them prepare to take up the line of march whenever orders were given from the signal station. When Grant ordered his forward movement, on the 4th of May, there were 147,000 men under his command, in and near Culpeper, disposed in three grand a
Old Joe Hooker (search for this): chapter 24
o wheel to the right, from their intrenchments, fall upon Sedgwick's right flank, and sweep the rear of his breastworks. The sun was low as this masterly movement began, but these men, that Stonewall Jackson had often led to flanking victory, knew what was in the air when the order to march was given, and they at once, with a wild yell, swung into line, fell upon Milroy's old brigade which they had routed in the Valley the preceding spring, just as its men were cooking their suppers, as was Hooker's right when struck at Chancellorsville, and quickly routed a mile of Sedgwick's line, capturing 600 of his men and two of his brigadiers; and they were still sweeping on to victory, even through the gathering darkness, when Ewell called a halt. Not knowing of the existence of Hancock's formidable intrenchments, Lee's right, consisting of the divisions of Field and Anderson, charged against Hancock, on the Brock road, to find themselves confronted by a wall of fire, made by the burning o
army to the Germanna and Ely fords of the Rapidan, instructing him, Lee's army will be your objective point. Wherever Lee goes, there will Lee goes, there will you go; and adding, that the characteristic of his campaign would be to hammer continuously against the armed force of the enemy and his reso nothing left him but submission. His expressed desire was to fight Lee between the Rapidan and Richmond, if he will stand. Sufficiently nd expecting an early advance, now that the spring was fully opened, Lee rode, on the 2d of May, 1864, to the signal station on Clark's mount preparations for which he took in hand on returning to his camp. Lee was accompanied to his point of observation by Longstreet, just retuid that after his information-seeking overlook of the Federal camps, Lee turned to these officers, and pointing toward Chancellorsville, saidnce. To meet this mighty host, which was about to pass his flank, Lee had, at the end of April, less than 62,000 men for battle; 22,000, u
Lunsford Lindsay Lomax (search for this): chapter 24
,000, under A. P. Hill, near Orange Court House; some 17,000, under Ewell, in the Mountain run valley; 10,000 in Longstreet's two divisions, encamped near Gordonsville; 224 guns in his batteries, manned by 4,800 artillerists; and 8,300 cavalrymen, under the leadership of Jeb Stuart. The cavalry corps was in two divisions, of three brigades each; the First, led by Wade Hampton, of South Carolina; the Second, by Fitz Lee, of Virginia. Fitz Lee's three brigades, commanded by W. H. F. Lee, L. L. Lomax and Williams F. Wickham, were all from Virginia. At the opening of the campaign, Stuart's cavalry held the line of the lower Rapidan and of the lower Rappahannock, guarding Lee's right flank. Stuart informed Lee of the arrival of Grant's army, on the north bank of the Rapidan, opposite the Germanna and Ely fords, on the 3d of May, and of the crossing of those fords by his advance on the next day. Knowing this, Lee, on the morning of the 4th, issued his usual precautionary orders again
James Longstreet (search for this): chapter 24
e plank road, in the same direction. At 11, Longstreet was ordering his advance, under Field, follod, sending message after message to hurry up Longstreet, to support the Confederate right when the br miles to the southwest from Ewell's, while Longstreet, that night, reached Brock's bridge, on the s along that road, to hold back Hill. Had Longstreet come to his assigned position, before this js veterans been there to be directed by Lee. Longstreet wandered along the many roads that led throuill's right. Under Lee's orders of urgency, Longstreet marched again at midnight, and the morning o line (that Lee had expected to replace with Longstreet, before daylight), but which he could not foin sent to the front. At 10 of the morning, Longstreet sent Mahone, with his four brigades, to turnon in line of battle, across the plank road, Longstreet, in person, led it against Hancock's retreate, which killed Jenkins and severely wounded Longstreet, thus checking an onset which promised to tu[12 more...]
George Meade (search for this): chapter 24
oversight of military operations in Virginia. Meade's army had not only been brought to a high dego put into execution by ordering an advance of Meade's army to the Germanna and Ely fords of the Ra Sufficiently informed of what was going on in Meade's army, and expecting an early advance, now th of the old Wilderness tavern, where Grant and Meade, accompanied by Assistant Secretary of War Dan skirmish, which held the Federals in check as Meade developed his lines of battle, along the fieldnes of Federals drawn up in battle array, when Meade's skirmishers suddenly advanced from the pine illery, and had good promise that he would cut Meade's line of movement. Just then Ewell received in check, in desultory engagement, and forced Meade to hesitate in pressing an advance beyond Lee'd withdraw two farther to the east. Grant and Meade were apprehensive, during all the 7th, that Lent plan of campaign. He was no longer urging Meade to hunt for Lee, and was looking anxiously for[2 more...]
Lafayette McLaws (search for this): chapter 24
the twice-attacked and twice-defended Fredericksburg. He doubtless asked himself just where—in that historic region where his famous ancestor, Spotswood, had built the first blastfur-nace for making iron, in America—the impending conflict would begin, immediate preparations for which he took in hand on returning to his camp. Lee was accompanied to his point of observation by Longstreet, just returned from his Tennessee campaign; Field, commanding Hood's old division, and Kershaw, that of McLaws; Ewell, and his division commanders, Early, Edward Johnson and Rodes; A. P. Hill, with his division commanders, R. H. Anderson, Heth and Wilcox. It is said that after his information-seeking overlook of the Federal camps, Lee turned to these officers, and pointing toward Chancellorsville, said, that in his opinion, the Federal army would cross at Germanna or at Ely's; and that he then bade them prepare to take up the line of march whenever orders were given from the signal station. When
and the head branches of the Pamunkey. In the evening of the 4th of May, Ewell established his headquarters near Locust Grove, on the old turnpike, with his advance but an hour's march from Grant's passing flank, on the same road, at the Wilderness run. Lee's second column, under Hill, which Lee accompanied, had its headquarters at Verdiersville, some four miles to the southwest from Ewell's, while Longstreet, that night, reached Brock's bridge, on the North Anna, on the old road that Lafayette had cut through the forest, to the northeastward, to Verdiersville, in order to form a junction with Wayne, and which, to this day, is known as the Marquis' road. During the night of the 4th, Lee sent orders to Ewell to march upon the enemy at daylight of the 5th, desiring to bring him to battle now as soon as possible. He ordered Hill forward at the same hour, and himself promptly rode to the front, along the plank road, and was with the pickets when the skirmish opened, at Parker's s
A. P. Hill (search for this): chapter 24
ss than 62,000 men for battle; 22,000, under A. P. Hill, near Orange Court House; some 17,000, under at a critical moment. Anderson's division, of Hill's corps, was left to guard the rear. With thery step of the Federal advance. Lee rode with Hill at the head of the right-hand column, on the Orthe Wilderness run. Lee's second column, under Hill, which Lee accompanied, had its headquarters at to battle now as soon as possible. He ordered Hill forward at the same hour, and himself promptly le fortifications along that road, to hold back Hill. Had Longstreet come to his assigned positioGrant's army took part in this attempt to drive Hill's two divisions from safeguarding Lee's right. ated and desperate but unsuccessful assaults on Hill's line. Stuart, on the extreme right, drove bah Hancock made prompt advance, again assaulting Hill's weak line (that Lee had expected to replace wst. The crisis of the engagement was at hand. Hill's rested men were again sent to the front. At [19 more...]
d also, with the wide interval already made between Warren and Hancock, have struck the latter in flank, with good prospect for defeating him as he turned back from Grant's on to Richmond. The three hours between 11 and 2 were quite enough for this work, had Longstreet's veterans been there to be directed by Lee. Longstreet wandered along the many roads that led through the great forests of Orange and Spottsylvania, making but 12 miles of easting during all the 5th, and halting at night at Richards' shop, miles away from Hill's right. Under Lee's orders of urgency, Longstreet marched again at midnight, and the morning of the 6th was well advanced when he appeared with his veterans to join in the hotly contested battle that had again begun. When, in the afternoon of the 5th, Hancock halted on the Brock road, with his right near the plank road, he was not satisfied with having thrown up along that road one line of formidable breastworks, upon its western side, toward Lee's front, bu
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...