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William Henry Fitzhugh Lee (search for this): chapter 24
for battle; 22,000, under A. P. Hill, near Orange Court House; some 17,000, under Ewell, in the Mountain run valley; 10,000 in Longstreet's two divisions, encamped near Gordonsville; 224 guns in his batteries, manned by 4,800 artillerists; and 8,300 cavalrymen, under the leadership of Jeb Stuart. The cavalry corps was in two divisions, of three brigades each; the First, led by Wade Hampton, of South Carolina; the Second, by Fitz Lee, of Virginia. Fitz Lee's three brigades, commanded by W. H. F. Lee, L. L. Lomax and Williams F. Wickham, were all from Virginia. At the opening of the campaign, Stuart's cavalry held the line of the lower Rapidan and of the lower Rappahannock, guarding Lee's right flank. Stuart informed Lee of the arrival of Grant's army, on the north bank of the Rapidan, opposite the Germanna and Ely fords, on the 3d of May, and of the crossing of those fords by his advance on the next day. Knowing this, Lee, on the morning of the 4th, issued his usual precautionary
rs near Locust Grove, on the old turnpike, with his advance but an hour's march from Grant's passing flank, on the same road, at the Wilderness run. Lee's second column, under Hill, which Lee accompanied, had its headquarters at Verdiersville, some four miles to the southwest from Ewell's, while Longstreet, that night, reached Brock's bridge, on the North Anna, on the old road that Lafayette had cut through the forest, to the northeastward, to Verdiersville, in order to form a junction with Wayne, and which, to this day, is known as the Marquis' road. During the night of the 4th, Lee sent orders to Ewell to march upon the enemy at daylight of the 5th, desiring to bring him to battle now as soon as possible. He ordered Hill forward at the same hour, and himself promptly rode to the front, along the plank road, and was with the pickets when the skirmish opened, at Parker's store, on that road, at the head of the Wilderness run, three miles south of the old Wilderness tavern, where
D. R. Jones (search for this): chapter 24
Lee's right Near the same time, about 11 of the morning, Ewell advanced Johnson's division, with Jones' brigade in skirmish front, pressed back Warren's skirmishers, and came in full view of his coluline of battle; which they promptly did and so forced an engagement before Lee was ready for it. Jones met the attack with a vigorous fire of musketry and artillery, and had good promise that he wouement. Just then Ewell received Lee's warning not to bring on a general engagement, and ordered Jones to fall slowly back, if pressed. Interpreting this as an order to fall back at once, Jones begaJones began to withdraw the field pieces in his skirmish line, which Griffin's division, of Warren's corps, took for a retreat, and so pressed upon Jones vigorously and drove his men back with the loss of theiJones vigorously and drove his men back with the loss of their leader, who fell in trying to stem the tide of retreat. Ewell promptly moved forward the brigades of Gordon and Daniel, crushed Griffin's victory disordered advance, and fell on the flank of the d
to the southward. Heth pushed his advantage in driving Crawford back along the plank road, met Getty at the crossing of the Brock road, and forced him to halt on the direct way to Richmond, which Ghurch, scarcely three miles away, at 11 a.m., just as Ewell and Heth were in hot engagement with Getty, when he was ordered back to Getty's contest, on the Brock road, which he had only reached at 2 Getty's contest, on the Brock road, which he had only reached at 2 of the afternoon, and to aid in the work of throwing up formidable fortifications along that road, to hold back Hill. Had Longstreet come to his assigned position, before this juncture of combat, with his 10,000 men, Lee could not only have crushed the advance of Crawford and Getty, as he did with Hill's men, but could have rolled it back into Ewell's battle, and to the probable discomfiture vance. Shortly after reaching the scene of conflict, at about half past 4, Hancock strengthened Getty's waiting division with portions of Gibbon's and Owens', and four Federal divisions, with other
le. He ordered Hill forward at the same hour, and himself promptly rode to the front, along the plank road, and was with the pickets when the skirmish opened, at Parker's store, on that road, at the head of the Wilderness run, three miles south of the old Wilderness tavern, where Grant and Meade, accompanied by Assistant Secretars run and fronting its wooded western watershed, which covered the deployment of Ewell and Hill. Lee, Stuart and Hill, riding to near the pickets in advance of Parker's store, had halted to look down the open valley of Wilderness run, at the long lines of Federals drawn up in battle array, when Meade's skirmishers suddenly adva march on the morning of the 5th, expected his army to traverse, having already ordered Hancock to Shady Grove church, on the headwaters of the Po, and Warren to Parker's store, in the same general direction, and Sedgwick to close up at the Wilderness tavern. Hancock, obeying his orders, had reached Todd's tavern, on the Brock r
d on both flanks, but especially on the left to keep touch with Ewell, and with Poague's battalion of artillery in the roadway, awaited Hancock's attack, which was inl was forced from the field, stubbornly fighting as he fell back to just behind Poague's artillery, which defiantly held the broad highway, and checked Hancock with cong it, and so were able to drive back the Federal assaults with heavy losses. Poague's guns, on the plank road, were able to give check to Hancock's advance, until ed. A line of battle was promptly formed, and the men, rushing forward, passed Poague's battery, and were advancing on Hancock's men, when they heard behind them, ang the charge, the Texans shouted, Go back, General Lee! Marse Robert, go back! Poague's men, from amid their guns, also called out, Come back! Come back, General Le ranks of Hancock's oncoming host, and the most of them to meet death. Part of Poague's guns moved forward in the charge, and the men with them shouted back to their
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 24
Chapter 24: The Wilderness campaign against Grant. Convinced by his failures that Meade could not lead the army of the Potomac to victory, Lincoln called Lieut.-Gen. U. S. Grant from the West, to the oversight of military operations in Virginia. Meade's army had not only been brought to a high degree of efficiency, by drill and discipline, during its winter encampment in Culpeper, but large numbers of fresh troops were added to it during the closing days of April Early in that month Grant arrived at Culpeper Court House, having in mind a definite plan of campaign toward Richmond, which he proceeded to put into execution by ordering an advance of Meade's army to the Germanna and Ely fords of the Rapidan, instructing him, Lee's army will be your objective point. Wherever Lee goes, there will you go; and adding, that the characteristic of his campaign would be to hammer continuously against the armed force of the enemy and his resources, until, by mere attrition, if noth
Edward Johnson (search for this): chapter 24
paign; Field, commanding Hood's old division, and Kershaw, that of McLaws; Ewell, and his division commanders, Early, Edward Johnson and Rodes; A. P. Hill, with his division commanders, R. H. Anderson, Heth and Wilcox. It is said that after his info, and a general battle appeared to have begun on Lee's right Near the same time, about 11 of the morning, Ewell advanced Johnson's division, with Jones' brigade in skirmish front, pressed back Warren's skirmishers, and came in full view of his columard Flat run, thus covering Ewell's front, which, as reformed, had Rodes' division on the right of the old turnpike with Johnson's on his left, followed by Early, extending the line to and beyond Flat run, where an open field furnished excellent pose for renewing the attack on Grant's flanks. As Lee moved to assault the Federal left on the plank road, Ewell detached Johnson's and Gordon's brigades from his extreme left, under the leadership of Early, to wheel to the right, from their intrench
John B. Gordon (search for this): chapter 24
ch Griffin's division, of Warren's corps, took for a retreat, and so pressed upon Jones vigorously and drove his men back with the loss of their leader, who fell in trying to stem the tide of retreat. Ewell promptly moved forward the brigades of Gordon and Daniel, crushed Griffin's victory disordered advance, and fell on the flank of the divisions of Crawford and Wadsworth. These he routed, and captured four Federal guns and many prisoners. Warren closed up his corps front, with his left retin the Brock road. Hill had already repulsed Burnside's feeble attack on Lee's center, and the time was opportune for renewing the attack on Grant's flanks. As Lee moved to assault the Federal left on the plank road, Ewell detached Johnson's and Gordon's brigades from his extreme left, under the leadership of Early, to wheel to the right, from their intrenchments, fall upon Sedgwick's right flank, and sweep the rear of his breastworks. The sun was low as this masterly movement began, but these
into the main roads leading directly to Richmond. Gregg's cavalry, moving along a parallel road to the southwest, toward Todd's tavern and Spottsylvania Court House, protected his flank from the incursions of Stuart's cavalry. Warren's corps had luart's cavalry were already skirmishing with those of Gregg, on the Brock road, in front of and far to Lee's right, toward Todd's tavern, while Ewell's skirmishers were in lively engagement with those of Warren, advanced to protect his flank on the Gn the same general direction, and Sedgwick to close up at the Wilderness tavern. Hancock, obeying his orders, had reached Todd's tavern, on the Brock road, and was turning to the southwest, by the Catharpin road, toward Shady Grove church, scarcely sition assigned for the first day's march will stand thus: General Warren's corps at Spottsylvania Court House; Hancock at Todd's tavern; Sedgwick on the road from Piney Branch church to Spottsylvania, and General Burnside at Aldrich's. It is not dem
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